Your Mosin IS Accurate!

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by Joshua M. Smith, Jun 3, 2011.

  1. Joshua M. Smith

    Joshua M. Smith New Member

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    Hello,

    I wrote this for my website, and because I post on many gun sites, I'm trying out posting by picture. Lets me manage from a central hub, and keeps me from having to reformat from HTML to BB code.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Good stuff. Thanks Josh.
     

  3. Ltriker

    Ltriker New Member

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    I have a good friend who enjoys shooting his MN 91/30 and is actually pretty good with it. Not long ago he decided to shoot the gong I have hanging at 800 yds...three rds to get sighted in and he was ringing it repeatedly. Original iron sights. What a great rifle.
     
  4. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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  5. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Who said the Mosin was inaccurate? The reason I bought a Mosin was cause I read the Russian snipers in WWII were taking out enemy troops at 800 meters... I dont think I can even see 800 meters outta that 2.5x scope... ;)
     
  6. remi514

    remi514 New Member

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    Today i finally finished cleaning my new mosin and decided to shoot it from 50 yards with iron sites. My buddy brought his remington 700 with a leupold scope on it out too. We just shot from lawn chairs with shooting sticks and i ended up with better groupings then him.:p I dont know how many people will believe this but its true your mosin can be very accurate.:D
     
  7. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Good post Josh, thanks. I recently acquired a M91/30 and have read a bunch of things about accuracy, factory sighting, etc so maybe this is a good place to get some input on what is fact and what is urban legend. For example:

    I have read that the armory sighting of a 91/30 is about 6"-8" high at 200 meters. Reason given is that Russian troops received very little training, if any at all, during WWII and were told simply to aim at the enemy's belt buckle...Fact or Fiction?

    Here's another, Russian military doctrine required the bayonet be affixed at all times, therefore the Mosin was designed so that the barrel harmonics were optimized for the extra 18" of steel forward of the muzzle. Shooting without the bayonet results in reduced accuracy...Fact or Fiction?

    Anybody else have any to add, anyone able to set the record straight and separate fact from fiction?

    Thanks...
     
  8. opaww

    opaww New Member

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    My 91/30 shoots about 2.5 MOA with iron sights at 100 yards and that is quite impressive for that rifle. The Russian requirement for accuracy of their weapons is if it hits the person then it is accurate
     
  9. Joshua M. Smith

    Joshua M. Smith New Member

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    Hello,

    The belt buckle thing is true, though not for the reasons you were told. They were simply sighted to get torso hits out to about 350 meters without having to touch the sight adjustment.

    Yes, they were sighted in with the bayonet mounted. Whether this provides more or less precision depends upon the individual rifle as the bayonet would act sort of like a BOSS system. However, in almost all cases it will change point of impact with the bayonet removed. Therefore, you should resight the rifle if you plan to do most shooting without the bayonet.

    Josh
     
  10. Boyerracing343

    Boyerracing343 New Member Supporter

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    good post, thanks for sharing.
     
  11. MrMosin

    MrMosin New Member

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    Haha, i never heard a single thing about Mosins being innacurate, (some people just must not be as good of a shot as an illiterate russian;)) one of the reasons i bought mine in the first place. I woulda guessed that the milsurp ammo was not very consistent, as they were just trying to get as much of it out the door as they could. Could the shooting high problem be resolved by using heavier grain rounds? Right now i am using 174 grain MFS FMJ and the surp rounds were i believe something like 147 grain.
     
  12. Joshua M. Smith

    Joshua M. Smith New Member

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    Hello,

    Folks do seem to think these are inaccurate minute-of-torso pieces.

    Google "Mosin-Nagant accuracy precision". Lots of Mosin bashing going on, especially by the AR crowd before they figured out that MNs can be good... :D

    I'm on LOTS of boards, and that's where this lil' article came from -- folks would ask me why I was trying to turn a pig's ear into a silk purse and all that.

    Josh
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2011
  13. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    I'm repeating what I read elsewhere on this forum, but here goes.

    Affixing bayonet does NOT make it more accurate, it just changes the point of impact. Thus, at 100 yards, it is not uncommon for 2-3 MOA with or without the bayonet. It is just that without the bayo, the POI is about 8" high and to the right. Thus 3 shots with bayo followed by 3 shots without bayo (same point of aim) will result in 2 relatively tight groups at two different points on the paper.

    Anyway, who doesn't want a 7-foot long pointy stick that goes BOOM?
     
  14. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    from what i understand 7.62x54r in ww2 used a 180-210 grain bullet. after ww2 the russians reuced the weight to 147 grain range in order to reduce wear on their light machine guns so weapons like the svd were design to fire that lighter bullet.

    ive gotten some astounding groups out of 1960s-1990s surplus but ive also gotten bad groups. i think a lot of it is because ammo quality of surplus is spotty at best.

    most of the ammo used in mosins is very light weight and accuracy can be very spotty using the light bullets. it can be very accurate as well. i got some 7n1 ammo used in svd rifles it was terrible in my mosin sniper. my 7.62x54r dies should be here this coming week. i plan n rolling some loads more in line for what a mosin rifling is designed for.
     
  15. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    The SVD was designed to shoot any bullet. 180gr are best. The Soviets never made a jacketed bullet heavier then 182gr in 7.62x54r. 147gr light ball was adopted to copy German 8x57 of the day, 147gr. The U.S. also changed to 150gr just to accomodate the M1 Garand. The Brits were the hold out staying w/ 174gr BT. The Japanese combined the .30-06 and .303 in their 7.7mm. .30-06 case, brit bullet as parents. 180gr 7.62x54r is smooth as silk. Recoil is actually mild and man does it hit. The Soviets did copy the .303 in bullet design, an aluminum nose under the jacket to make it tumble upon impact.
     
  16. erikthebald

    erikthebald New Member

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    640 Yards

    Shortly after I picked up my Mosin I found a YouTube video of a dude ringing a plate at 640 yards off a bench with a M/N.

    I've not had the opportunity to shoot mine past 100 yards but at 100 I can get three touching when shooting off a bench rest.
     
  17. SoupNazi

    SoupNazi New Member

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    I love mine - $120 - it is a man's rifle. Russians know how to make weapons!

    Accuracy: It is more accurate than I am... I can hit the 8.5x11" paper at 100 yards so I am happy.
     
  18. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    How about thoughts between a 91/30 vs. M44...

    And price is a consideration. At $100-150 how does the 91/30 stack up against the $200-250 of the M44?

    I am really drawn to the shorter length of the M44. Plus, as long as the bayo should be affixed for point of aim to be closer to correct, the fact that the M44 has the bayo already sitting there ready to go is a big plus.

    But is the M44 really twice as good?
     
  19. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Ive been keeping my open for one in good shape ive seen em at the range and they shoot a very very impressive fireball.