You can only have one rifle

Discussion in 'Auto & Semi-Auto Discussion' started by Striker9Mil, Aug 27, 2018.

  1. Double20

    Double20 Active Member

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    Looking at the ballistics of the 277 WLV vs the 6.8 SPC II, I still don't see an advantage to the 277 WLV. The ballistics are nearly identical. As I stated, I will not be shooting a lot of rounds per year with this particular caliber and don't wish to reload for whatever AR-15 hunting round I decide on so I will rely on factory ammo. Despite there being some factory ammo for the 277 WLV, there seems to be a much better selection and availability for the 6.8 and the 6.8 is slightly cheaper. The only advantages I see would be if you reload you can use .223 brass and that you could use the same bolt and magazines as a .223. But if I buy a complete upper for the 6.8 with charging handle and bolt carrier group and purchase a single 5 round 6.8 magazine to use for hunting purposes then I would be set for hunting with factory ammo. I'm not saying that the 277 WLV is inferior or somehow a bad selection but for my circumstances I don't see the 277 WLV having an advantage over the 6.8 mainly due to availability and selection of factory ammo. If the 277 WLV was ballistically superior to the 6.8 I might have a different opinion. If I was interested in reloading for this caliber I might also have a different opinion. But as it is, the 6.8 makes more sense to me for my usage than the 277 WLV.
     
  2. Wambli

    Wambli Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, yo no hablo this "one rifle" thing you speak of... :confused:
     
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  3. SK2344

    SK2344 Active Member

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    Mine would be a Winchester Lever Action with 10 rounds of .45 Long Colt Ammo!
     
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  4. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Probably a good choice if your range is short.
    I have considered my Marlin 1894cs 357 mag but the 7.62x39 has more power and range. Ammo weight is about the same so no real gain.
     
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  5. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    browning BAR in 7.62 nato.
     
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  6. Mcsorleyprobert

    Mcsorleyprobert Active Member

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    Hungarian ak-47 with FEG receiver!
    I think it’s the Hungarian paratrooper rifle.
    Was a Amd-65,now it’s a converted AK
    nice rifle, accurate, reliable, no issues from 8K rds.

    She is my go to!

    Sad to see her go, forced to sell a year ago.
    Not left with much these days.
     
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  7. Shopfox

    Shopfox Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have an 18" 6.8spc, a 16" .308 AR-10, mostly used for deer (crop damage permits). Every single time, I grab the 6.8spc. The AR-10 isn't fun to carry, or pull up a tree from a climber.

    The biggies for me is, it's lighter, low recoil (my 10 y.o. can shoot it), accurate, decent factory ammo is available, and it drops deer at practical shooting distances (farthest shots have been 3 different deer at 150 yards w.the 6.8).

    I think the 6.5 and 6.8 are a tossup for hunting, but now that the market is stabilized, would give the 6.5 the nod. Availability of steel cased ammo makes a stockpile less expensive, long-range ballistics look better (at least on paper).

    I looked at the 277 WLV. @Txhillbilly already did that iirc. Short of it is, you'll spend a ton of money (custom dies, custom barrel), and it's essentially a reloading only proposition with no published loads. If going down that rabbit hole, at least pick a cartridge with some performance advantage over the 6.5G.
     
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  8. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You know, to develop the original question in a more rational way, you first need to define the situation that limits you to one rifle. I can foresee scenarios that the best single rifle to own would be a semi-auto in .22 L.R. In which case I would pick one of my old tube fed rifles. There is something to be said for being able to carry 500 rounds in your pockets. You could pre-store a lifetime supply of ammo in a foot locker.

    In a time where people are having to live off the land, large game would disappear very rapidly. Small game such as squirrels, coons, possums or rats may be the most readily available source of protein. A .22 is perfect for harvesting such game. A .22 is easy to muffle, therefore stealthy, easy to get rapid follow-up shots and is deadly. In a time with no access to first class medical care and antibiotics, a .22 wound, could prove fatal even if it did not hit a vital organ, it just takes about three or four days.
     
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  9. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    one rifle,huh? well, I'll have to go with what is is the most reliable, easy to maintain, doesn't require cleaning it to operating room standard and what what over 106 country's army around the planet use, and there are estimated over 100 million of them...……

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    True in a select fire, but in semi auto I prefer the SKS. Besides that, how could a rile made out of steel and wood be worth a damn. Give me plastic or give me death.
     
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  11. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    The title of this thread brings chills up my spine each time I read it!

    Good thread, but un-nerving.

    All depends on your needs, wants, and personal desires: killing little critters, killing feral hogs and such, defense of you and your property/loved ones, etc.

    "Only one" is the chilling part. The 2A had arms as plural.
     
  12. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yup, I'd ignore that rule completely!
     
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  13. Les Moore

    Les Moore Well-Known Member

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    STILL my Elmer Fudd 30.06 . . .
     
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  14. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think that it is interesting that most people want a weapon rather than a harvesting tool. Or course, it may be easier to take necessities by using a weapon than a tool. There are two tools on my gun rack that have harvested more small game and some larger game than anything else. A .22 L.R. single shot bolt action and a single barrel .12 ga., long barrel full choke shotgun. Both belonged to my FIL who put protein on the table with them out of need, not sport.
     
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  15. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    I understand that mentality Chain. I've known a bunch of the generation older than me who were "poachers by necessity" to feed their families. Most of them favored the 12 gauge shotgun or 22lr in single shot format. Bolt or break actions. Not because it was a superior weapon, but because it was the least expensive tool to put meat on the table.

    Easy to get ammo for, or reload an equivalent work around in some situations. Think hand pressed shot shells and 22 nail driver blanks. When the real ammo runs out. Or milling coarse black powder in some of our brass tumblers, using farm chemicals.

    These guns were practical and cheap enough to toss in a ditch if the game wardens were after them. They could toss it in a few inches of water in a field side ditch and come back and get it later. Yes, thats a story that I've heard from more than one poacher. So I take it as pretty realistic situation.

    I've got a few of these old guns in my collection now. Battle scarred, worn and faded. They have minimal monetary value. But handling them reminds me of the men who used them and later passed them on to me. Usually with more than a few good stories, or memories of hunting camps past...

    I can see a lot of our more delicate mechanism style guns laying down and dieing as the replacement parts get scarce. In a true SHTF situation simple is definitely better for longevity measured in generations. The humble break action would likely be one of the longest lived firearms. Less to go wrong with it. Think about it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2019
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  16. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Well-Known Member

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    Nope,I never wanted a 277 Wolverine.Stuffing a larger bullet into a 223 case is a waste of time to me - case size is too small for me.
    I did build an AR Performance Six5 - a 6.5mm bullet in a 6.8mm case. It shoots pretty good,and I use it with my Night Vision for hogs/predators. I still prefer my 6.8 SPC II or my DPMS 260 Remington over it.
     
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  17. Danwin22

    Danwin22 Member

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    I’m 81 so a .22 is a winner for me. There are always twelve or more squirrels in our back yard and they call their friends when we throw corn on the ground. Around dusk a huge flock of doves show up.

    Haven’t had even one deer show up yet so I’m good with my CZ 452 and Nikon 3-9 x 40 scope
    and 30,000 rounds of ammo. My Winchester 30-30 Trapper is getting arthritis from sitting in the safe.
     
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  18. Mcsorleyprobert

    Mcsorleyprobert Active Member

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    Would love one of those VEPR rifles.
    Prices out of my league these days!

    Someday.....