Yelling at your attacker

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by JohnSilver, Jul 19, 2007.

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  1. JohnSilver

    JohnSilver New Member

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    Does anyone think that if you were to yell at the top of your lungs in the correct way at an attacker it can give you a psychological edge over them or would it make you lose your nerve and concentration in the situation?
     
  2. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    ...bullets will work on more people than yelling in the "correct" way. By the time you think to take a deep breath and yell, the attacker can be on you from 15 feet. You'll have more time to take a deep breath after you shoot 'em than before.
     

  3. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    The army seems to like using noise when attacking, I don't see why it wouldn't work on a one on one confrontation.
     
  4. Varro

    Varro New Member

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    A strong command in your voice instead of the yelling...However, make sure you really mean business about "pulling the trigger" if need be....
    Unfortunately, a few of my acquaitences have admitted that their carry is "strictly a bluff". They wouldn't pull the trigger even to protect their family...How sad....:eek:
     
  5. Spartan

    Spartan New Member

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    battle cry

    ditto, it catches them by surprise, gives you an extra half second to close range so you can make sure you dont miss...also good for closing to ka-bar range if you like it a bit more personal.
     
  6. Spartan

    Spartan New Member

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    for those a little less experienced

    for those a little less experienced in confrontation, urinating on yourself is also a great deterent, people tend not to want to get too close to people who have peed themselves, defecating all over yourself takes that whole philosophy to the next level, the smell is usually a dead giveaway. plus, if it was an intended rape, you can be sure it will never happen at that point.
     
  7. cnorman18

    cnorman18 New Member

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    Yell, schmell. Focus on two things: (1) front sight and (2) squeezing the trigger. If you have time and energy for anything else, you're not doing it right.
    The Army uses telling in the context of an offensive action, when it maximizes shock and surprise. In a defensive situation, it's much less useful. It's much more likely that you'll be dealing with the effect of your attacker yelling at YOU.
    Hit your target. Nothing else matters.
    ...I might very well urinate on myself during a confrontation, but I doubt it will be a conscious tactical decision...
     
  8. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Yelling

    From a LE stand point I have found that your brain can only do one thing at a time (very well). Giving commands while shooting usually results in unintelligable commands and innaccurate shooting. Do one thing at a time, yell then shoot, shoot then yell, shoot then shoot some more.
     
  9. ranger_sxt

    ranger_sxt New Member

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    I have to agree with robocop10mm, up to a point. Yelling while shooting, is going to be very difficult. Most police officers aren't up to the standard to do that.

    Yelling before bringing the gun into play is a different manner.

    Many training organizations have begun to suggest yelling at the attacker, prior to bringing the gun into play. It is not so much to gain a psychological edge, but to cover you in a legal liability. By yelling things like "Stop!" "Don't touch me/him/her!" "I have a gun!" you give any surrounding witnesses the idea that you were in fear of your life, and gave this goblin the ability to escape. Obviously, the guy must be crazy if he attacked you, after you told him you had a gun.

    Likewise, yelling is preferred to merely talking in a normal voice. The physiological reactions to a life-threatening encounter often include auditory exclusion or magnification. If one doesn't yell, the voice may not be audible, although it sounds like you are screaming in your ears.

    In short, yelling before is good. Yelling during is difficult, and you should instead concentrate on your fundamentals.
     
  10. Gearguy10

    Gearguy10 New Member

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    Just never yell, "Stop, or I'll shoot you!" You can can be darn sure if you do the little old lady that witnesses the confrontation will only hear you say, "I'll shoot you." And will swear to it in court.
     
  11. Spartan

    Spartan New Member

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    yelling at attacker

    there was a mall shooting in tacoma washington, where one of the retailers was on his way to do his money drop when a kid came into the mall and opened fire with an assault rifle, as brave as this retailer was, while carrying his concealed weapon, instead of shooting the SOB with the assault rifle who was shooting helpless innocent people, he made the mistake of yelling at the suspect to drop his gun. this being said, the poor retailer ended up being shot with a 7.62 nato round which ripped through him like a can opener. it was a shame that the bravery of this fellow was not sufficient to end the situation, had decisiveness taken precidence, he would have pointed and shot and downed the suspect, who i think is not trying to plead insanity if i remember correctly. point and shoot, if its a scenario where life is actually threatened. the repercusions and consequences wont come into play after, thinking about them beforehand will only get you or someone else killed. they say killing is a hard thing to do well there is a reason for that and too much thinking before has a serious affect on reaction and effectiveness
     
  12. ranger_sxt

    ranger_sxt New Member

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    1.) It wasn't 7.62 NATO, it was 7.62x39.

    2.) If anyone is saying that yell at someone as opposed to using lethal force, I must have missed it. You yell as part of your drawing process, in addition to moving. This both interrupts their OODA loop, and also gives witnesses an idea that you were in fear of your life and warned the guy prior.
     
  13. Max-K-9

    Max-K-9 New Member

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    In reference to Spartan's posting if the subject is already firing there is no need to yell or command the subject to stop according to most law enforcement use of force models. Just draw and take em out!! You will be a hero. But as always be careful of your backdrop.
     
  14. mortpes

    mortpes New Member

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    I would yell like STOP or some such. Its a good thing to do in the last seconds of life, yours or his. I think it helps you to focus on the task at hand. And maybe the BG will back off and you can hold your fire.
     
  15. Righteous

    Righteous New Member

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    I always yell..... Make My Day !! lol
     
  16. Defender

    Defender New Member

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    Maybe if you're being attacked by a wimp. If you're being attacked by a street smart "bad dude", you'll probably just get his adrenalin flowing a little more.

    Instead of wasting a few seconds yelling, use that time to draw down on him. In a dangerous situation, you need to make good use of every second.
     
  17. GlenJohnson

    GlenJohnson New Member

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    It's been a hell of a long time since I was in the military, but the only yelling I remember was in hand to hand combat. On the range, we just aimed and pulled the trigger.
     
  18. Flint Rock

    Flint Rock New Member

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    Too Fast

    Situations develope to fast for all this yelling nonsense:mad:. Reaction, instinct, and muscle memory - that's the big three as I see it. Yelling can come before or after, not during the situation.
     
  19. ranger_sxt

    ranger_sxt New Member

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    Since I'm not mentally retarded, I can do two things at once, like draw a gun and yell...
     
  20. Defender

    Defender New Member

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    Since I'm not mentally retarded, I wouldn't attempt to yell at him to begin with. The OP asked our opinion on whether yelling at the top of your lungs was useful, and said nothing about drawing a weapon. I told him to forget the yelling and draw his weapon.

    Yelling at the top of your lungs while simultaneously drawing your weapon would most likely hurt your own concentration, and get your assailant's adrenalin flowing. Two things you DON't want to do.

    Having formerly been in law enforcement--I've never heard of any military entity, police department, SWAT trainer, FBI or individual firearms expert who recommends such foolishness as yelling forcefully while you draw.

    If you can point us to one that does, please do.
     
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