WW2-Korea era equipment. What is it?

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by texaswoodworker, Jun 27, 2012.

  1. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

    10,198
    0
    0
    A few years ago, we picked up this wavemeter from an antique shop for about $25. It looked cool, and I though it would look good on a shelf. The problem is, I don't really know anything about it. I've tried looking it up, but I never found out ANYTHING about it other then that it may have been used during either WW2, or Korea. We think it may have also came off a aircraft, but we're not sure.

    Sorry about the crappy pics, I took them with my phone.

    The big dial also has some writing, but I couldn't get a readable picture with my phone. Here's what it says.

    Left lower corner--- TYPE DO-41
    ---------------------- F.S.A.=.00002

    Right lower corner--- MODEL
    ------------------------ AAA257

    Middle--- GENERAL ELECTRIC
    ---------- MADE IN U.S.A. :)

    The scale on the dial also goes up to 100.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    There is also some extremely small writing on the black dial next to the big white one.

    It says NP110918

    ----------------------------------------------------------

    Finally, there is a small logo next to the ID plate shown in the picture.

    I can't completely read it, but it looks like it's an AN in a circle with some writing under it.


    Any ideas what this thing is, what it came off of, or what it was used for?

    Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

    3,495
    0
    0
    Looks like a calibration or measuring device for phone lines or radios. Does the meter say cycles or Hz or something?
     

  3. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

    10,198
    0
    0
    I couldn't find any units of measurement marked on it. :confused:
     
  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

    20,110
    15
    38
    its a test device for radio equipment. your missing a knob. it looks kinda like an antenna tester or maybe a line tester. wavemeter ts-192/cpm-4 is the name of the device. if you search hard enough you will likely find the military manuals for its usage
     
  5. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

    12,360
    31
    48
    I have to agree. A SWR meter is used to match the radio to the antenna for the best trans/receive signals.

    I believe the knob was used to bypass the requirement of attenna adjustment.
     
  6. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

    10,198
    0
    0
    I did a little Googleing, and I found a manual that mentions it. I didn't read enough of it to know exactly what they used it for, but it was possibly used to test electrical equipment (most likely radio equipment, or radio waves).

    Thanks guys. I'm going to keep looking into it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2012
  7. utf59

    utf59 New Member

    676
    0
    0
    Since it's from the Signal Corps, I'd agree with Dan that it's probably an SWR meter.

    If you have a CB (and maybe the right adapter) you can use it on that.

    IF YOU DON'T CARE ABOUT RADIO STUFF, STOP READING NOW!

    An SWR (Standing Wave Ratio) meter measures standing waves coming from an antenna. Standing waves are waves that are off-frequency from the intended sending frequency. They sort of "fill in" within waves sent at the intended frequency and distort the signal. Think of ripples in a pond. If one thing makes ripples (waves), they are clear. If something smaller also makes waves, they bump into each other, and there are smaller waves within the original wave pattern. When the radio and antenna are in tune, the signal is clearer.

    Operating frequencies change daily (or even more often) and field stations move frequently, so you can't set up an antenna one time and leave it. Antennas were often adjustable (two spools of antenna wire), and they could be set at the correct length for the frequency being used. Once that was done, you tuned the antenna. Part of that procedure included checking the SWR meter. If it was too high, you had to readjust the length of the antenna.

    utf59
    Former 31C (single-channel radio operator)
     
  8. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

    3,495
    0
    0
    My other thought was that it was part of Mr. Peabody's 'Way Back Machine', but I guess not.