working a load

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by grandpabear, Sep 1, 2012.

  1. grandpabear

    grandpabear New Member

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    In your opinion, what shows better results in tightening up a group when working up a load? Increases in charge as you get to max or lengthening oal and getting the bullet closer to the lans and grooves?
     
  2. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Each gun is different. I usually start out loading .020 off the lands,and I'll load from the low end to maximum powder charges,always looking for pressure signs on the brass and primers.
    I always step up in 1 grain increments to begin with.When I find where the rifle shoots good,then I'll load from 1 grain lower to 1 grain higher in 2/10ths of a grain increments to find the sweet spot.
    Then I'll try different primers,and when I find what works best,then I'll play with the OAL some more.
    Most of my guns shoot best with the bullets from .015-.035" off the lands.
     

  3. Centurian22

    Centurian22 New Member

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    +1 to all TX said. I don't yet reload but have done alot of research and most seem to follow similar logic powder first, then Distance from lands.
     
  4. ryguy00

    ryguy00 New Member

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    Whatever you do, only change one thing at a time. If you change powder charge and bullet length together, you wont know which change made the difference on target.

    I like to start with my bullets just touching the lands and work up powder charge. My past experience is that bullets do not like to have to jump from the case mouth to the lands. They dont like to be started out smashed into the lands either.When i find the velocity that the barrel likes, then i will play with oal to see where the bullets like to be launched from. If you have a chronograph and change bullets in the future, you can use that ballpark velocity as a starting point for working up a new load. It is a nice little shortcut that will usually save some time.

    Keep in mind that the more you shoot, the more the throat erodes. So as time goes on, that sweet spot you find for your oal will have to be crept out longer to match throat erosion. Higher velocity calibers like 22BR, 22-250 and 220 swift will accelerate barrel and throat wear when pushed closer to max loadings.
     
  5. musketshooter

    musketshooter New Member

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    In many guns, the brand and type of primers make a difference.
     
  6. Centurian22

    Centurian22 New Member

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    Could you possibly elaborate with some examples? I'm curious because I've heard many people state they see little to no difference between primers. Is it more often semi's or bolt guns? I'd imagine semi's.
     
  7. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Trying different primers can show some great differences in Grouping,POI of the same loadings of ammo.
    Each gun powder has a different burn rate,and some primers work better with them,and also the fill % of the case with whatever type of powder that your trying to use.
    Faster burning powders don't seem to be affected as much with primer changes,but I've noticed some decent changes using slower burning powders in some of my rifles,up to .500" differences in grouping sizes with a simple primer change.

    Each brand of primer uses their own priming compound,so it's like everything else,they have different characteristics with each brand.
    Under certain conditions Brand A works better than Brand C & D,but Brand B & E make things worse shooting the same exact powder charge and OAL of the cartridge.
     
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    txhillbilly, have you ever tried wolf primers?? ive been getting outstanding results with them in my 223 loads. they turn in the same results as cci primers. 308 i havent done much load building but they seem excellent
     
  9. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Yes I have Jon,The Wolf primers have been very good for me. I've always had good luck with Winchester primers,as well as Remington,and CCI.
    I have a few boxes of Magtech,but they haven't impressed me with anything yet.
    Personally,I think most of the Benchrest primers are a joke,just an extra expense in reloading,and I've never seen any advantage of using them over a standard primer.
    I have seen some improvements in using Magnum primers with the slower burn rate powders over using a Standard primer with several loads.
     
  10. 1hole

    1hole New Member

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    Increases in charge as you get to max or lengthening oal and getting the bullet closer to the lans and grooves?

    Basically, yes.
     
  11. Centurian22

    Centurian22 New Member

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    TX: thanks for the reply and info. Sorry for hijacking the thread, just one more question. Any input on primers / powders that are least affected by / perform best at low temperatures (20-40 degrees F)? I plan to reload .308 for hunting whitetail in Maine (thinking of 165 sierra gamekings boattail soft point) and the last thing I need to hear when I finally get that great buck in the sights and pull the trigger is "Click".
     
  12. steve4102

    steve4102 New Member

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    I have not had any problems with my loads at those temp. I did have issues with H380 several years ago, but that was more like 10 below.

    If you are concerned about it stick with the Hodgdon Extreme line.
    http://www.hodgdon.com/extreme.html
     
  13. steve4102

    steve4102 New Member

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    Maybe, maybe not, I can't say for sure, but I like the Fed 210M and 215M for all of my large rifle loads. I like Rem 7 1/2 for my small rifle loads as well. Not so much that it is a BR primer, but it's the only primer Rem makes that will work in the 223/5.56 and the 6.5 Grendel.