Wood Gasification?

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by user4, Aug 5, 2009.

  1. user4

    user4 New Member

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    I discovered this series called "The Colony" last week, that sets up a cross section of people of various backgrounds and skill sets trying to "survive" in an urban apocalypse setting.

    Since I caught the series late, I missed how they were able to make a wood gasifier that basically uses wood to power their electric power generator.

    As I understand it, this technology is quite old, but tried and true. People in Europe used wood gas to power their cars (no, not like a steam engine) back in WWII.

    Has anyone here tried this? Is there a good blueprint in laymen terms that we could publish here for the good of the community? I'm sure I could look it up and become an expert in a month, but I'd like to see if anyone here has tried this and to what success.
     
  2. user4

    user4 New Member

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    I should add this video which shows an end product and how it works, but they're also trying to sell you the kit, so it's not too revealing. However the video might get some of you as excited about this as I am.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCtLZWnTuog]YouTube - Wood Gasification: Alternative Energy Source[/ame]
     

  3. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    Here's a Vid of a car running on wood chips.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8JyazgRBtq8]YouTube - Trash Powered Honda - DIY - www.gekgasifier.com[/ame]
     
  4. Troy Michalik

    Troy Michalik Is it Friday yet? Supporter

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    I've never heard of it myself, but a quick search turned up woodgas.net. Looks like pretty interesting home project.

    There is a pretty detailed write up in the download section.
     
  5. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    Last edited: Aug 5, 2009
  6. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    Very interesting stuff. I might have to play with this. If I singe my eye brows off I promise to post pics.
     
  7. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

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    Well when they can BBQ chicken or a steak on there at the same time and power the car too, I will pay more attention to it. It just goes to prove 'Necessity is the mother of invention.'
     
  8. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    I can remember buses in the Philippines running on gasification units that burned coconut shells. For me, a great way to dispose of burnable trash and garden waste to produce electricity for my home.
     
  9. user4

    user4 New Member

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    The guys on The Colony are using two cans and a hose.... wood is in the the first can and isn't ignited. That can is then placed in a larger can (steel drum) and there is wood in there that IS ignited to hest the other can and created a form of coal out of the wood which creates the gas vapors...this this is powering a generator!
     
  10. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    How are they trapping the gas and forcing it into a generator? Is it similar to a propane burning engine? if so that would require a way to pressurize it. Can you post a link to what you're talking about?
     
  11. user4

    user4 New Member

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    The one on the show is here: The Colony : Builds To Survive : Discovery Channel

    There are several of their projects, select gasifier.
     
  12. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I see some intersting challenges with simply using a pipe and feeding it into the air intake. Without seeing details priming could be an issue. I'm curious as to how they got the engine started. They could use a fan of some sort to blow the gas into the engine, it was done on some desiels in years past or perhaps the turning over of the engine is enough.

    Air/fuel mixture is also a concern.

    I would be intersted to know the qualities of the gas and possible long term effects on the combustion chamber, piston rings, valves, valve guides and seals.

    Still a very interesting idea and something that will be of discussion on Saturday as my dad and I continue a 347 build for a customer.
     
  13. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    Here is a series of vids on youtube explaining gasification [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PZr9uXegZw]YouTube - Wood Gasification: Gasification 101 module 1[/ame]
     
  14. user4

    user4 New Member

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    It's a sealed container, so the air/fuel has only one direction to go... out the tube into the fuel tank. I too am curious about the long term affects on seals. rings, and other relevant components.

    That first video I posted shows it at work and it seems to run like a dream. No hesitation. Other videos on youtube show people driving cars with it.
     
  15. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I undestand the movement of the gas naturally from the heated source into a tank. I was more concerned with how they directed it into the engine without some type of pressure tank unless they are using the heat source as pressure to move it into the engine which would work but then you're burning hot fuel and hot air, not very efficient.
    As well as hooking an ignition source up to a large tank of explosive gas which doesn't excite me. One backfire and we'd all loose our eye brows.

    Could you cool the gas first so you can mix more fuel/air for more power?

    How are they metering the fuel and air? A carb could be jetted but you'd need to isolate both the fuel and the air to do so which I'm not sure would work anyway. I really think you'd have to use a propane like system which brings me right back around to the pressure issue.

    This will be good conversation on Saturday.
     
  16. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    Me too, I'm still researching the process. I do like these

    [​IMG]

    Woodgas Camp Stoves
     
  17. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    Last edited: Aug 5, 2009
  18. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I can see how that would get the basics taken care of but still, how to you correctly meter the fuel/air mixture?

    Here they are using a blower to draw the gas into the motor which will introduce air to the gas prior to the carb. How do you maintain consistancy?

    I was also curious about how consistant the gas itself is. Does differnt wood give you different properties? or heat? ambient temp?

    Great guys! way to give me another thing I feel the need to research, understand and possibly build. Maybe I'll be the first guy mowing his lawn with a wood powered John Deere.
     
  19. matt g

    matt g New Member Supporter

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    I've seen wood out gas many times, but I've never done anything to harness it. If you look closely when you have a nice hot campfire burning with coniferous wood, the smoke will be blue, but the wood will be giving off whitish gray fumes. That's the wood out gassing what is essentially a turpentine that is given off when the sap and pitch in the wood evaporates under the heat of the fire.