Winchester 94

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Thelt, Dec 20, 2009.

  1. Thelt

    Thelt New Member

    128
    0
    0
    How much should I pay for one of these? I want one chambered for .30-.30.
     
  2. VitSports6

    VitSports6 New Member

    736
    0
    0
    I was told that my post 64 Winchester Model 94 30-30 (1981 build) could be worth about $600.00 due to the condition, But that was just some guy who had been looking for one, So take that for what it is.
    The older and more sought after pre-64's can go for a bit more, Also depending on the condition.
     

  3. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

    2,361
    1
    0
    I got my first Win. 94, 44 years ago and they were selling for around $100.00 new. Used post-1964 are selling for $135.00 (60%) to $275.00 (100%). MSRP is around $350.00.

    Even though the Model 94 has probably killed more whitetails than any other firearm produced, it also has the distinction of being one of the most dangerous firearms ever produced. So do yourself a favor and try to find one with a cross-block safety. The cross-block safety makes the 94 a even better firearm.
     
  4. Thelt

    Thelt New Member

    128
    0
    0
    What makes it dangerous? I assume the safety has issues?

    I am not looking for a collectors item so a more recent model might be better.
     
  5. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

    10,270
    1
    0
    I bought my 1952 model 94 for $300. That's about the going price for one of that vintage in "average" condition like mine. Bluing is just about gone, dings in the stock...a lot of character, just the way I like it.
     
  6. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

    459
    1
    0
    HUNTERJOE may I ask what you base your statement on about a 94 being such a dangerous firearm?
     
  7. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

    2,361
    1
    0
    The Model 94 has to be unloaded by jacking each round through the chamber and every time you do this the action cocks the hammer. Adults normally do not have a problem with this but in every hunter safety class that I have conducted in the past 13 years, at least half of the students under the age of 14 years drops the hammer on the dummy round when trying to make the firearms safe after loading.

    There are a series of steps a person has to do to make the firearm safe after loading a shell in the chamber, squeeze the lever so that it engages the safety on the stock, pull the hammer back, squeeze the trigger, carefully let the hammer down on a live round, and put the firearm on half-cock. Here is where it gets tricky for small hands especially small cold hand wearing gloves.

    I guess I base my assessment of the model 94 on many years of experience and observation. I believe that the Win. 94 is a great firearm only made better with the cross-block safety.
     
  8. Dr. Marneaus

    Dr. Marneaus New Member

    376
    0
    0
    Am I correct in that Winchester has stopped producing the Model 94, currently? I know throughout the history of the rifle it has been in on-and-off production, but my research shows they are not currently in production?
     
  9. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

    1,733
    0
    0
    I looked up my dad's 1942 serial numbers,and in it's condition(very good)I could find them for no less than $1200.
     
  10. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

    5,549
    2
    0
    Safe gun handling, with a focus on keeping the trigger finger off the trigger, is far more valuable than a cross bolt safety. Those who rely on mechanical safeties tend to be more casual in my experience. I grew up with lever action rifles and never had a single problem.

    No flame intended.
     
  11. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

    459
    1
    0
    HUNTER JOE I too have had vast experence with 94 Winchesters, having owned more than I count in the last 45 years. While I agree with you on some points I must point out that you do not have to completely close the bolt to empty the magazine. I regularly use 94's and my way is to only half way pull the lever and the shell pops up and I simply turn the gun upside down and it drops the cartridge into my open hand. To condem a firearm style simply because you have to lower the hammer, then you must also condem all single and double action revolvers, 1911 style pistols, and just about every firearm that has a hammer. Yes improperly handled, a small weak handed person could result in a dangerous situation when lowering the hammer on a live round, but to say the 94 is more dangerous than any other hammer gun I believe is unjust. As to all above posters reguarding cost of 94's I have to disagree with most. Many people want theirs particular item to be more valuable than the actual market value. I cant count the number of pre 64 model 1894's and model 94's I have owned so I have a pretty fair knowledge of pricing. With the exception of the rare models, most 70% rifle sell for @$1100 while pre 1932 carbines realise @$700, 1932 to 1950 model carbines in 80% bring @$450 and 1950 to 1963 carbine in 80% condition realise @$375.
     
  12. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

    2,361
    1
    0
    The prices I gave for the 94 was post 64 and if you read closely I said that the 94 "one of the most dangerous firearms ever produced". Believe me, I'm not a 94 hater in any respect, matter of fact, I took my first whitetail with a 94.

    IMO the 94 is a very dangerous hunting firearm in unskilled hands. It never fails that in every class I teach (3 to 4 classes year, and up to 150 students a year) some student's grandfather or father has a story to tell about an accidental discharge involving a 94.

    I know that a firearm's safety in not a substitute for safe firearm handling, although, IMO the half cock feature on the 94 is very safe, it's just getting to that position that is dangerous.

    The Marlin Firearm Co. produces a very nice lever gun with a cross block safety.
     
  13. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

    459
    1
    0
    HUNTERJOE interesting however I have never heard of an accidental discharge from a 94. Of course there has to be many from any type of firearm, but any gun with an exposed hammer is a potential hazard. Have you ever witnessed an accidental discharge from a 94 while in the process of unloading? I had an accidental discharge using a Winchester model 97 while in the process of unloading it. This particular firearm must have the trigger pulled while slowly lowering the hammer, this must be done to release the bolt to remove a round from the chamber. After a very cold hunt my thumb slipped off the hammer as I was unloading. However no body was in danger as the gun was point away from any other hunters and pointed at the ground, nothing more than if I had been shooting at a rabbit. Hammer guns are best left for the experenced.
     
  14. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

    564
    0
    0

    Any firearm in the hands of an unskilled person can be dangerous; even in relatively skilled hands they can be. I don't know how many times I've watched one of my hunting buddies discharge their shotgun trying to figure out their safety.

    I've had my Winchester 94 for almost 30 years and have never had a problem.
     
  15. Don Davis

    Don Davis New Member

    421
    0
    0
    +1 hunter Joe

    When I was deer hunting in high school I did that by accident :eek:

    Cold fingers / lack of attention / Lot's of reasons - it happens. :eek:

    Luckily no one around but me. :cool:

    I gave that one to my son and use this one now.

    [​IMG]

    By the way I love that gun and had shot a lot of deer with it.

    It's still active today - but I sure screwed up with it once 50 years ago
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2010
  16. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    4
    0
    Quoted for the muthereffing truth.
     
  17. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

    2,361
    1
    0
    I teach my students that the definition of a safety is, a mechanical device that can and will fail. I also add, a safety is not a substitute for safe firearm handling. I like to refer to safeties as "not a safety". I've been teaching this concept to students for nearly 14 years now and thank God, none of them have been involved in a firearm related incident.

    The point I was trying to make about the cross-block safety on lever guns is, that in addition to safe firearm handling, a cross block safety can stop the hammer from engaging the firing pin. The cross block safety IMHO is a definite improvement to the lever gun.

    Whereas, any firearm with a sear when dropped hard enough hitting the butt of the stock against a solid object ,such as the ground, can cause the firearm to discharge, safety on or not. This is how hunters shoot themselves when dropping firearms out of tree stands.

    See rule number two, always point your muzzle in a safe direction.

    By the way, keeping your finger off the trigger until your ready to shoot is rule number four.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2010