Firearms Talk banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently traded a sporterized 30-40 krag for an old Belgium made shotgun. the guy only wanted 250 for but didn’t have the cash on me so offered a trade. I was wondering if I could get any info on it and determine it’s value.
243118
3F17B973-C310-4B2C-9F59-D767A0D13610.jpeg
243119
243120
243121
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I felt like it was a decent deal. I was trying to do everything to get rid of that 30-40 ammo for it isn’t easy to find or cheap when you do. Thanks for the info though!
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
12,467 Posts
97,
Missouri is correct.
In 2005 one sold on line for $200.00 Today the estimated value is from $250-$350 Depending on the condition and $350 with a good Bore. However they are beautiful wall hangers. If you choose to shoot it do not use modern shells with modern powder. They have Damascus Barrels and Black Powder Shells should Only be used in them.
Here is one that in 2005 it sold for $200.00 on the Gun Seller Sight!
I would say yours is on a slightly higher scale due to the Designs on the Hammer, Barrel and Lock Plates. So I would just speculate around $400 - $450 on yours.
Wilmot 1.jpg
Wilmot 2.jpg

Wilmot 3 - Copy.jpg

Wilmot 4 - Copy.jpg


03
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
243130
I found one that looks exactly like mine with the hexagon breech that sold for 650 not long ago.although it had 85% of its finish still.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,283 Posts
I know that the Springfield Missouri Bass Pro (the headquarters store) does firearm appraisals.
I would think that all the Bass Pro's would do the same. And maybe Cabelas as well since BP now owns them.
Might be worth a call to see if they would do that for you. Their "eyes" may be able to give you a better idea of the value.
Who knows, it may be something you would trade in on that gun you always wanted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i never knew that about bass pro. We have one pretty close here. I’ll have to give em a call and see. This is my first old Belgium sxs so I was pretty curious about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was reading a lot of the reasons people blew em up was. They didn’t what they were reloading with and would use pistol powder and reload shot shells with insane volumes of powder that would blow up even modern shotguns. It did fine yesterday I put 6 cheap low brass federal rounds through it just to make sure it fired and didn’t hold any of the wad. But I’m going next week to have inspected by a gunsmith.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
12,467 Posts
97
Your Shotgun looks very nice! And that one in the picture that was sold looks good as well. But I think overall yours is in better shape other than the wood on the other one. But has it been refinished on the other gun? So IMO your shotgun would be worth the same if not more if a specific buyer was looking for that specific gun. Yours seems to have a better metal finish and the wood is great from what I see.
I simply love the old guns! They are a work of Art IMO! If only they could talk and share their History!

03
 
  • Like
Reactions: Seedy Character

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,488 Posts
You do know that the 12ga. was shorter in the day than our 2 3/4" shell. You are shooting shells even with low brass that was heavier than anything in that day. Have at it. It's your shotgun.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,475 Posts
^^^^^^^^^
What he said! I still have one super nice old SXS with Damascus Barrels. The shells you just shot are too high in pressure. ALL modern commercial shot shells are. We used to have 2 in the family. Both made by Janssen in Belgium.
Looks just like yours, especially the stock. Appears to be same stock. But now, only one is left.

My Grand Pa had two of them he brought back from Canada many decades ago. He ran thrashing Machines for them up in the Prairie Grain Provinces for many years. Never shot either until one day in about 1955. I was 10. We went to shoot a bunch of pigeons that had taken over his barn. He bought the lightest 12ga loads he could buy. Short brass rounds.
On about the 10th to 12th round it blew up big time. Shrapnel in the face and his right arm and shoulder.

I have the second one and it will not be fired for ANY reason. These are not shooters today..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I definitely won’t be putting anymore rounds through it unless I have it looked at by a gunsmith. I’ve posted on a few different sites and had varying opinions on the matter. I’ll most likely just purchase ammo through RST. I’d love to see some other guns like it. I really like the carvings done to the few I’ve found. I think mine has been refinished I’m not entirely sure. But it definitely doesn’t show its age if estimates are correct from what I’ve been told.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,488 Posts
The problem is not the quality or condition of your gun. Both appear to be good. Damascus is made from platted iron and steel rods forge welded together. Sure enough some people insist on shooing these guns. Some of the people contemplate what was formerly their left hand. if the gun lets go at the very minimum it's ruined.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
391 Posts
Just curious, do your barrels have the word Damascus stamped on them ?
The barrels on the gun in the 2nd set of photos does have the Damascus marking, and does not show a pattern.
I would think the barrels on that 2nd gun have been reblued at some point covering the pattern.
If your gun has damascus stamped on them , and no pattern is visible yours might have been reblued also.
Not a bad thing if the barrels are slow rust blued, but very bad if hot blued.
I do believe your shotgun was more than likely sold through the Sears catalog many years ago.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,488 Posts
Just curious, do your barrels have the word Damascus stamped on them ?
Steel barrels brought more money in a growing collectors market. Back in the day it was not unknown for Damascus barrels to be blued after a little handy work polishing. The prevailing notions was this was done to deceive. We see "Damascus" stamped on guns from Sears and the others. On higher quality guns not necessarily so. The various patterns in the Damascus were named.

If the gun finish is worn the pattern may be more visible under the forend. One test was to take a small place under the wood. Clean with alcohol or similar to get rid of the grease. In ancient times we would use iodine to bring out the pattern. The Damascus was a selling point in the 19th. Century. One noted American company destroyed their Damascus blanks in the era after WW1. Gun barrels as we know them had became a selling point. I don't think any reputable gunsmith would tell you to shoot modern smokeless in Damascus barrels.

Added: There are websites describing what the Belgian proof marks mean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
it does say Damascus on the barrel and I believe it’s just slow rusted but I’m not sure how to tell the difference. I did find someone who explained proof marks to me and we think it’s from 1885 to 1900.
243189
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top