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Now that I got your attention....

I got into a discussion on FB, friend of a friend, made the claim that revolvers are not for women. I had to ask why. From her retired LEO, conceal carry instructor

Revolver grips are too big for women
Revolver barrels are too short
Revolvers are difficult to manipulate

I called her instructor an F'ing idiot, and got blocked!

Why is it the national organizations don't police their ranks like other professions?
My wife has been shooting handguns most of her adult life and is very good at it. She is a former Peace Officer and owns both revolvers and semi-auto pistols. Her preference in 'carrying' is a Bersa Thunder .380 because it is light and so easily concealed (yes she has a license!) and she is well aware the Bersa is not a firearm to be carried into a fire fight.

Her S&W Model 66 is no problem for her even with magnum loads. She is a small woman but handles it very well....I would not tell her that revolvers are not for her!
 

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And yet women regularly defend themselves with semi autos , legally, no charges. Even though they divertef from the ONLY way to go.
Not getting into a peeing contest with you over this . But women are just as capable of using a semi auto as men.
Ill train a woman and have several to use a semi auto, defensivy , from arms length to 20 yards,out. Clear jams , shoot on the move. And shoot or no shoot.

JMO opinion after 50 yrs of carrying and showing folks how to shoot , but if the adrenaline is that out of control it doesnt matter a iota what trigger pull the person has.
The trick is to teach the person mental control as well.

JMO based on my own experience.
Thank you for proving my point. You said they could be 'trained', which I agree with completely. But the problem is VERY few people take the time or $ to train past the initial training which is basically ' familiarization' with the weapon. So IF the person is willing to get the proper training and do the practice, which is 4 to 5 times more with an auto than a revolver, you are correct. but you are totally wrong about the trigger pull. That has been shown MANY times by LE shooting alone, and they are more trained then MOST civilians.
 

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It doesn’t have a slide or a magazine.
The number of moving parts is not the problem. It is how much more complicated the 'operation' of the semi-auto machine is compared to a revolver.
 
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Why ? i would think they should have and use whatever they want.
Do you mean 'what they are SAFE and confident with'?????? Or just what they 'want'????? 😕
 

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Thank you for proving my point. You said they could be 'trained', which I agree with completely. But the problem is VERY few people take the time or $ to train past the initial training which is basically ' familiarization' with the weapon. So IF the person is willing to get the proper training and do the practice, which is 4 to 5 times more with an auto than a revolver, you are correct. but you are totally wrong about the trigger pull. That has been shown MANY times by LE shooting alone, and they are more trained then MOST civilians.
Your point was taken to start with.

I was speaking to those women I have trained, with what they chose which was semi auto.
I dont charge , so money is no hinderence and I dont just " familiarize " the lady with her pistol. I take her from basic to knowing how and being able to proficently load , rack, unload, and shoot , at speed, with movement .
In fact i just finished the third session with the pastors daughter and son i mentioned before in another thread. Can i teach her everything in one 3 hr session , no. But when we ARE finished she will be proficent with all aspects of her semi auto and very much capable of defending herself .
I trained my late wife the same way and she regularly out performed LE friends of ours when shooting togerher.

Im not sure id hold LE out as better trained than " most citizens" . Better trained than some sure. But id question most. Not with their hit to miss ratio and frequency of shooting them selfs or others negligently.

Revolvers are simpler to operate possibly but harder to be accurate with unless you only go back 3 to 7 yards . And if one locks up, it does happen more frequently that many realize 99 times out of 100 it takes a teardown to get it functional again
Plus if grandma is faced with say 4 determined home invaders she is probably better off with a loaded chambered 17 shot 9mm pistol than a 5 rd 38 snub. Even if she cant rack it herself.

Again I love revolvers . But if a female chooses a semi auto thats her choice .


Again JMO based on my experiences. Just like your point is your opinion based on yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Im not sure id hold LE out as better trained than " most citizens" . Better trained than some sure. But id question most. Not with their hit to miss ratio and frequency of shooting them selfs or others negligently.
I RSO at the largest PPC in the country. We get a mix of population. Some LEO are in the top shooter category. Most are good. But some, SMH why they are ever provided a firearm, is a really good question. Worst one, shot (IRC) 125 out of 600. What drives me crazy, is this new firearm handling they are being trained. They load an empty firearm with a magazine, while it's still in the holster. I've seen more than one pop out after the first round is fired. I asked even chairman, why they are doing that. He said it's their training for qualification, where they line up and are fed through the qual line.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Her preference in 'carrying' is a Bersa Thunder .380 because it is light and so easily concealed (yes she has a license!) and she is well aware the Bersa is not a firearm to be carried into a fire fight.
I'd take a Bersa 380 into a firefight over a sharp stick. Biggest problem I have with my wifes, that silly safety!
 

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Your point was taken to start with.

I was speaking to those women I have trained, with what they chose which was semi auto.
I dont charge , so money is no hinderence and I dont just " familiarize " the lady with her pistol. I take her from basic to knowing how and being able to proficently load , rack, unload, and shoot , at speed, with movement .
In fact i just finished the third session with the pastors daughter and son i mentioned before in another thread. Can i teach her everything in one 3 hr session , no. But when we ARE finished she will be proficent with all aspects of her semi auto and very much capable of defending herself .
I trained my late wife the same way and she regularly out performed LE friends of ours when shooting togerher.

Im not sure id hold LE out as better trained than " most citizens" . Better trained than some sure. But id question most. Not with their hit to miss ratio and frequency of shooting them selfs or others negligently.

Revolvers are simpler to operate possibly but harder to be accurate with unless you only go back 3 to 7 yards . And if one locks up, it does happen more frequently that many realize 99 times out of 100 it takes a teardown to get it functional again
Plus if grandma is faced with say 4 determined home invaders she is probably better off with a loaded chambered 17 shot 9mm pistol than a 5 rd 38 snub. Even if she cant rack it herself.

Again I love revolvers . But if a female chooses a semi auto thats her choice .


Again JMO based on my experiences. Just like your point is your opinion based on yours.
Wolf, I usually remind myself,m interacting with Jim, that he holds onto the old ways, more often than not. (No Jim, I ain't bashing of badmouthing you, so relax.) something that shows up all the time when asked what weapon for a new shooter, is best, for SD.

Almost always a S&W 36 or 636, which was the standard answer for most in LE fir decades. Which I'm not saying is wrong, but it depends oi the shooter, the law, and how the law affects options. That and what they are comfortable with.

Sane answer comes out, if I bring up my 24 YO daughter, or her 19 YO cousin, daughter in Ohio, cousin in NY, still going to be a J frame (Which yes, she has one of my old ones.) However, if both were the same age, that J frame is off the table. Have to be 21 in both states, and have a license in one of them.

Daughter has a few of my grandfather's handguns, semi and revolver, her grandfather's, mostly revolver, and a few of mine and her mom's (Currently eyeing up, and dropping hints about my Delta Elite in fact. One I'm still adjusting to owning,m given it's history, and I know there's blood on it.) She likes revovlers more, but is confortable with either one, because that's what dad and I trained her with. Both.

Cousin, is using a Henry in .357 Mag, because, for the next two years, minimum, she can not get a handgun legally, where she lives. Yes, she has come down here, and we did talk her mom into letting her learn how to shoot, when she was 13, but she in not comfortable with a handgun yet. Not a lack of skill, just working up to the confodence SHE needs in herself, before considering one.

In the ine case, yes, I'd have no issues handing her the DE357, the SRH in .454, and the .500 the wife traded the Honda Rebel I fixed up, for, with light loads (Still working my own way up with that one.)

Her cousin, I kind of agree with Jim, but here's the rub.

She doesn't like how it feels in her hands. Light weight, and stiff recoil. Which is why many women do go for further training, as they listened to their instructor, and bought the wrong gun, because he told her to get an Airweight Smith, and use +Ps in it. (Again Jim, not a bash. Fact in my experience.)

But, if I hand her the SP101 in .327, the GP100, even with magnums, she's perfectly fine with them. Even the P95 and the 92FS, work well for her. Goldilocks fr her in the G19, when it comes to autos.

And yes, she intends to stay in NY for at least another 8 years. Working on a law degree, so she will be taking the class, instructor is a close friend of ours, and applying for the permit, then deciding where to go, after she has her degree, and takes the Bar. Makes sense to keep it all in one state, and a law degree from UB is worth sticking around for. Only reason she's staying in the state and area.

Given the choice, which she'll have in another couple years, she's more likely to go auto.

That's why I don't give a one size fits all answer, like many instructors do. The only reason my wife even has 4 revolvers, is mainly hunting related, with the SP101, being the odd one out (Can't use an auto for big game here.) In NY, hell, she used to go after deer with the 10 inch barrel on the DE Mark VII, more often than not, but now has a DW 15 VH, running an 8 inch barrel, and an LER optic on it, for that purpose.

Again, nothing against Jim, I respect him, but the weapons suggestions do kinf of need to advance some, even though I get why he would brubg up the J frame as a good option. Enough power to get the job done, small and light enough to conceal, and overall, a bit less likely to bite the owner, if they don't look to continue training, and make a mistake, as that trigger pull takes commitment for it to go bang. Compared to a Glock, it's a safer option, with fewer external, moving parts, and simpler work past for the FTF cases, and less complex to clear.

In many cases, it is the right answer, when it comes to the mechanics, but Winds also points out something worth taking into account.

How much we she have been out shooting, to get comfortable, and safer, as well as better, had she passed in the GP100, and gone or a 6 or 66? The GP100 was easier to shoot, because it's a heavy chunk of steel.

To anyone that wants to argue that, I ask this.

Whrn was the last time you ran a full box of 50, through an LC9, in a single trip? Or a S&W airweight?

Most run a mag, maybe 2, to make sure it works, but decide to spare their wrists, and shoot something full sized, me included, for a reason. I run a box through the PF9 or LC9, my wrists are hurting for a few days after doing so, and I enjoy stiff recoil. Snappy recoil, not so much.And I know it's not just me, as I remember Winds bringing up pain from shooting the small .380 she has.

Pick what you will carry, and pick another one up, that works the same, that you will train with. That's why we own 3 Glocks, a 19, 26, and 43. 2 get carried due to size and weight, the other gets used for practice, for the same reason.
 

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Now that I got your attention....

I got into a discussion on FB, friend of a friend, made the claim that revolvers are not for women. I had to ask why. From her retired LEO, conceal carry instructor

Revolver grips are too big for women
Revolver barrels are too short
Revolvers are difficult to manipulate

I called her instructor an F'ing idiot, and got blocked!

Why is it the national organizations don't police thier ranks like other professions?
Makes me curious as to what this "professional" thought would be the ideal firearm for a woman.

I've shot & owned a few semi auto mouse guns & the one thing they all have in common is they are awful to try & target shoot with. Hard to grip, nasty recoil, small sight radius, etc. If he's suggesting one of those over a small frame revolver he clearly is an idiot.

Firearms aren't a one size fits all, i encourage anyone, male or female, to try a bunch of different guns to find what works for them....but then again i'm not a "professional."
 

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Now that I got your attention....

I got into a discussion on FB, friend of a friend, made the claim that revolvers are not for women. I had to ask why. From her retired LEO, conceal carry instructor

Revolver grips are too big for women
Revolver barrels are too short
Revolvers are difficult to manipulate

I called her instructor an F'ing idiot, and got blocked!

Why is it the national organizations don't police thier ranks like other professions?
that guy is a sexist, has he never heard of kgb?
 

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The number of moving parts is not the problem. It is how much more complicated the 'operation' of the semi-auto machine is compared to a revolver.
The semi-auto pistol has less moving parts and far less complicated. But, I see what you mean with that auto pistol, there is more room for operator error. Not knowing if its loaded chamber, or for get its on safety, or not on safety, is the mag loaded, is it in place properly, and ect... But Glock fixed all that, for the most part. Just have to remember its loaded
 

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This thread is more about women than guns it seems. They can shoot anything a male can shoot. BTW, there are only men and women. Either sex can shoot whatever they want. Maybe a poll would help......not.....
 

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Story time, get out the popcorn and adult beverages.

When I took my now ex-wife home from our first date her roommate was watching a movie starring Kurt Russell as the guy in Texas who climbed a tower and started shooting at one of the colleges. I can't remember the details, it was a true story, but one I hadn't heard at the time. At one point in the movie a cop is berating a gun store owner for selling the guy "that much ammo" (paraphrase).I I blurted out that I had 4 or 5 times that much on hand horrorfying her roommate.

2 or 3 dates later she wants me to take her shooting, because she now knows I am a gun guy. We go to the local indoor range and I load a magazine for my Browning Buckmark and give her some basic instruction, I stand close behind her while she shoots watching closely. While I am watching I am loading a mag for my 1911 long slide. She puts 10 shots in the 7 circle with the Browning first time out. She then turns around sets the Browning down grabs the 1911, I had inserted the mag but not closed the slide, she thumbs down the slide release, and puts 7 inside the 8 circle this time. Turns out her dad and brother are not gun guys persay, but they are serious hunters, and she had been taught the basics. One of the reasons she was a keeper, somewhere along the line she decided I wasn't a keeper though.

This brings me to my current dilemma, my brother and his wife have asked me to teach them to shoot. Neither one will become a "gun person". Sister in law is a former insurance salesman/adjuster, she is scared of everything that walks, talks, or digs holes. She will be the problem. Brother is a doctor, he wants to protect the family in an emergency. At this time they want get their concealed carry permits. I have a range here on the place. My basic plan is to conduct a basic familarization (revolver vs semi auto) and safety class, then urge them to take the NRA beginner course. followed by the carry course. I invite comments and Ideas. I do not want to pass on my bad habits, but want my brother to show up for the class prepared.

I am going to stress revolvers, because they will not practice as much as they should, also I am a revolver guy in general, but my edc is a S&W M&P Shield..
 
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