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Now that I got your attention....

I got into a discussion on FB, friend of a friend, made the claim that revolvers are not for women. I had to ask why. From her retired LEO, conceal carry instructor

Revolver grips are too big for women
Revolver barrels are too short
Revolvers are difficult to manipulate

I called her instructor an F'ing idiot, and got blocked!

Why is it the national organizations don't police thier ranks like other professions?
 

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My first gun WAS a revolver. It was recommended to me because they are easier to use for a novice, less likely to jam, less moving parts. As for barrels too short, I have a GP100, stainless steel, 6” barrel. 😂
 

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Double action revolvers have as many or more moving parts than a semi auto pistol. It varies with the design. Revolvers can jam. I have had it happen more than once and it is usually very hard to get back into operation. Usually with hot loads. The 1911 came about because of reliability issues with revolvers on the battle field. Revolvers do not like dirt.
My wife learned on a S&W 19. She hated loading mags. Now she can no longer pull a double action trigger with one finger and she has learned to load mags. Home protection for her is a 22lr rifle and she is good with it. A lot better than she is with a pistol. If a woman has a problem with a slide she may well have a problem with a heavy trigger. Always check ability to function before recommending a revolver or a semi auto. There are easy rack pistols available now.
 
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Revolver grips are too big for women
Revolver barrels are too short
Revolvers are difficult to manipulate
Hm.

I'd disagree with those things as well.

I've got smaller hands. Any number of lady friends I've of mine over the years have had hands larger than mine. Yet I've been able to operate and use revolvers relatively easily. Granted, there are some big, behemoth grips out there. Pachmayr's largest for big revolvers comes to mind. But an appropriately-sized grip on any gun's going to help it be as slim and easily operated as can be. Revolvers included.

Barrels can be short, "right" or long. I've used them all. A properly balanced sidearm, revolvers included, for me tend to have mid-sized to longer barrels on them. A poorly-balanced gun can be tougher to aim well, under fire. At least, for me they are. I'm sure most of that is due to time in the saddle, which serious training could likely mitigate. I've always found it easier to be accurate with a gun with some heft, and great balance. Which, in a revolver, has been something in the ~30-45oz range and a 4-5" bbl. But, everyone's different.

A difficult to operate gun is rough, with any gun one can think of. Much is correctable through familiarity and practice, of course. But in general I'd say that revolvers are about as simple as it gets. Easy to unload, load, fire. Perhaps not the speediest for the reloading step, but certainly easy to operate. One control (aside from the trigger), and just about impossible to get it wrong.

As for the gender thing ... So long as a given gun properly fits the person, and so long as the training is sufficient to yield familiarity and competency, generally speaking I tend to get out-shot by my lady friends once they've found the "right" gun for them. Whatever it is that explains it, exactness of training, or a more open mind during training, or more-focused practice sessions, or more dry-fire time, or what, it's quite common that a woman who's gone after excellence in shooting ends up being pretty darned good at it. Whichever gun's involved.

That all being said, I suck (accuracy-wise) with shorty revolvers, particularly lightweight ones. And I've shot several for many thousands of rounds. They just don't easily become part of my muscle memory, or whatever. But, double the weight of the gun and slap a 4-5" barrel on it, and I'm a modern-day Wyatt Earp with the dang thing, by comparison. Go figure. Many report much the same thing, that "snubbies" can be a devil of a thing to be accurate with. To say nothing about ill-fitting, behemoth guns. Never could properly handle a ParaOrdnance P14; never could reach the darned controls and never could control it under fire due to the monster grip circumference. Give me a Browning Hi-Power with slimmer grips, though, and I'm in heaven.
 

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Last year when the manure storm started I took my grandma to the gun shop and had her handle what ever appealed to her. She struggled with the slides so we went to the revolver counter. Decided on a 3” Taurus 38spc. Handed her my credit card and she filled out her first 4473 :) She’d always hunted squirrel with my great grandpa though so she’s no stranger to guns. Put her first cylinder all on a 2x2’ target about 10 yards out, I was impressed!
 

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Flame me if you like, but I agree, somewhat, with the officer mentioned by the OP, but I wouldn't limit it to only women. MHO? a DA revolver is a gun for an experienced shooter. Even then, it takes time and practice to get proficient, and you've gotta be good. With 5-6 shots on board and a difficult stress reload, you can't afford to miss, and you darn sure can't spray & pray. If someone new to shooting and especially concealed carry were to ask me, I'd strongly suggest they do their best to master an auto loader.
 
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I've never seen a limp wrist related malfunction with a revolver. The smart move up front is to allow a woman to handle the gun. Pulling the slide back usually eliminates most autos. Would a revolver be simpler than teaching how to clear malfunctions in an automatic?

My sister borrowed my 6" Model 19 to take her carry class. The gun worked great with 38 Special handloads. She made 100% on the shooting portion. She was pleased but Ray Charles could have passed that test. We are looking for a Model 10 with 4"barrel. We'll pass on the auto's.
 

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Now that I got your attention....

I got into a discussion on FB, friend of a friend, made the claim that revolvers are not for women. I had to ask why. From her retired LEO, conceal carry instructor

Revolver grips are too big for women
Revolver barrels are too short
Revolvers are difficult to manipulate

I called her instructor an F'ing idiot, and got blocked!

Why is it the national organizations don't police thier ranks like other professions?
It would appear to me that the instructor was not the brightest star in the sky...

Every time I hear folks predetermining what gun or guns women should or should not use I have to laugh! The same guys won’t typically try to tell their buddy what gun is best for them, but they think they should tell a woman what is best for her...even pick out the gun for her.

Several years ago a friend of mine shared the story of him setting his wife up with the right pistol for her when she had come to the conclusion she should learn more and attain her concealed carry permit. He was sure she would be better off with .380 or 9mm and had her try a lot of different guns to see what she liked best. She didn’t really like any of them that much nor did she like .38 revolvers much either. But after a fashion she was pretty content with a couple 9mm pistols, one was a CZ 75 compact model and I do not remember what he said the other was. So they took those and some other stuff and went out to shoot for the afternoon. As the afternoon wore on she asked him why he never let her try the gun he was shooting (officers 1911). He replied that he did not think she would appreciate shooting that little .45. His wife is a petite lady. So they talked about 1911’s a bit and he suggested they could get one in 9mm if she wanted to try one. She was looking at his and checking out the feel of it and asked if she could try it. He loaded up a mag for her and briefly explained the 1911 again and she gave it a try. Then she shot another mag full...and another, and basically shot up about a box full of ammo and was destroying the center of the target from 7 yards. Upon finishing she said, “I want this one.” To this day, that is still her carry gun...and she is really good with it! The petite lady prefers the compact 1911 in .45 ACP...:unsure:
 

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My wife went though the law enforcement academy about 30 years ago, and at the time they were training with revolvers, full size revolvers, she has small hands, and she ended up near the top of the class in shooting evaluations. (revolver and shotgun) She beat out a heck of a lot of good-old-boy, lifetime shooters. Her go-to piece today is a S&W 10-6, and you wouldn't want to be on the wrong end of it. .38 spl. defensive rounds are man-stoppers! In my opinion, there is nothing obsolete about a revolver for self-protection for the average citizen, male or female. The estimate of the average number of shots fired in a self-defense situation is one to three, that leaves a reasonable margin of safety in a five six shot revolver. Of course, if you thought you may one day face a shoot-out against multiple assailants, you would want more magazine capacity, but that is not the danger you are ever likely to face.

To try to say that "women" in the collective, should not use revolvers is just BS.
 

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Back in the days when we could have cartridge-firing handguns on mainland UK, my wife would regularly clean the collective clocks of our base police on Wednesday afternoon range sessions, sometimes with my Walther PP in 9mmK, or S&W 686 Trophy in .357Mag, but best of all with her all-time favourite, a 4" bbl Model 29 with Hogue grips. Sure it was only a squickpeep load by .44 Mag standards - 8.5gr of something behind a 240gr SWC - but it was still mighty cheering to watch her putting apertures through the black as fast as she could pull the trigger.

I still have both revolvers de-activated, of course. The Walther, a 1939 Vienna Special Branch police issue with matching holster, got me $3900, even de-activated.

And my wife thankfully un-deactivated. :) ;)
 

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My first gun WAS a revolver. It was recommended to me because they are easier to use for a novice, less likely to jam, less moving parts. As for barrels too short, I have a GP100, stainless steel, 6” barrel. 😂
You nailed it!! I have been in the 'business' for over 50 years instructing military, LE, and civilians in the use of firearms and have adopted a the KISS method. Keep It Simple & Safe! The learning curve to be safe and proficient with an auto is at least 4 to 5 times than that of a revolver so to keep it Simple and Safe start with a revolver. So if gun owners/carriers are not going to spend A LOT of time training and practicing, which 95+% of guns owners do not, the revolver is the BEST choice for them. If they proceed in their proficiency/training the auto then can be considered. This is just common sence to those of us 'elders'! ;)
 

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When my wife was able to handle recoil she shot my aluminum frame officers model 1911 in 45 ACP and she could handle it. She shot a Glock 19 for a short while but then chose a Ruger SR9c which is a really nice little pistol. After shooting hers I bought one so we could share mags. When things went south for her and she could no longer handle the recoil I sold them to a friend that wanted a matched pair for him and his wife. She does have a Ruger SR22 which she likes but the 1st round DA is rough for her. She likes the Ruger 22-45 better but the safety is a pita. I don't like the safety either but I love the gun and put up with it. I am looking for a 22lr pistol for her like the Glock 44, Taurus TX22 or Keltec P17 but they are scarce and she has to try it on 1st. She was shooting a Glock 19 for a while so the 44 is probably the best option. Ruger needs to come out with a 22lr based on the SR9c. Get rid of the DA and de-cocker. Have not been able to find a Ruger LCP2 in 22lr for her to try.
 

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This topic is hogwash. Ladies, in my experience, are much easier to bring from zero experience to qualifying than gentlemen if they truly want to learn.
First - most actually listen to the instructor
Second- Ladies have better small muscle control in their hands
Thrid - they generally have no preconceived "notions" that conflict with course material

As with anyone wishing to become proficient, the firearm must "fit" them - small hands are a problem with large handguns firing double-action but many are available that will work just fine. Recoil can be a problem, but one that can be overcome with proper instruction. There are handguns that present challenges to most every shooter. it's not about gender.

One of the consistently-high scoring bullseye shooter I ever shot with was a female cop in Warrensburg, Missouri. She preacticed often, mastered the basics, and either chose what was best suited to her or had modifications done that optimized her skills. Qualification with revolvers on B-27 targets went the same way. Desire to learn is the thing.
 

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This topic is hogwash. Ladies, in my experience, are much easier to bring from zero experience to qualifying than gentlemen if they truly want to learn.
First - most actually listen to the instructor
Second- Ladies have better small muscle control in their hands
Thrid - they generally have no preconceived "notions" that conflict with course material

As with anyone wishing to become proficient, the firearm must "fit" them - small hands are a problem with large handguns firing double-action but many are available that will work just fine. Recoil can be a problem, but one that can be overcome with proper instruction. There are handguns that present challenges to most every shooter. it's not about gender.

One of the consistently-high scoring bullseye shooter I ever shot with was a female cop in Warrensburg, Missouri. She preacticed often, mastered the basics, and either chose what was best suited to her or had modifications done that optimized her skills. Qualification with revolvers on B-27 targets went the same way. Desire to learn is the thing.
I am absolutely in total agreement with you on this . When I was teaching CCW classes my best students were women who never fired a gun in their life. My second best were a gay (guy) couple who had never handled guns. My hardest classes were good-ole-boys who grew up with guns, who thought they were bad ***. I had to watch them like a hawk, and one I had to send home because he did not get the part about "sweeping" other people with his handgun. I warned him three times, and when the third time he told me it wasn't loaded, that was enough, he got his money back.

I never taught over two people at the time in my classes, usually couples or friends. I did the classes for fun, the money was not the point. When the formal part of the (NRA ) class was over, we would shoot until people started to tire. If they wanted to try a handgun that I owned, I would drag it out. (it was usually the "45." The extra time usually about an extra hour. We did the classes at my place so range time was not an issue. I only quit teaching the classes because of the potential liability, but it was fun while it lasted.

I will never forget one of those women, who had never previously handled a firearm, who, by the end of the day was embarrassing me with her shooting with my 1911! . She paid attention, she followed instruction and she didn't have any bad habits to unlearn, and she was just a natural shooter. She took to it like a frog to water and had herself a ball. I really felt sorry for her poor husband who took the class with her, he was an "experienced shooter" but she cleaned his clock.
 

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This topic is hogwash. Ladies, in my experience, are much easier to bring from zero experience to qualifying than gentlemen if they truly want to learn.
First - most actually listen to the instructor
Second- Ladies have better small muscle control in their hands
Thrid - they generally have no preconceived "notions" that conflict with course material
This^^^^. Females are not eaten up with male egos.

A female college classmate was in dire danger of serious harm from her ex hubby. Despite a restraining order, the perp had broken in and assaulted the lady: The police and prosecutor would do nothing. Lady wished to learn how to handle a handgun. A male classmate and myself gave her an eight hour crash course that included a shooting session.

Yep, the ex broke in again and got double tapped with a borrowed Smith & Wesson model 19.
 

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Double action revolvers have as many or more moving parts than a semi auto pistol. It varies with the design. Revolvers can jam. I have had it happen more than once and it is usually very hard to get back into operation. Usually with hot loads. The 1911 came about because of reliability issues with revolvers on the battle field. Revolvers do not like dirt.
My wife learned on a S&W 19. She hated loading mags. Now she can no longer pull a double action trigger with one finger and she has learned to load mags. Home protection for her is a 22lr rifle and she is good with it. A lot better than she is with a pistol. If a woman has a problem with a slide she may well have a problem with a heavy trigger. Always check ability to function before recommending a revolver or a semi auto. There are easy rack pistols available now.
Say What?

Sure, any man made tool breaks. I suspect that you could break and anvil if you worked at it. Revolvers are surely more likely to fail when fed a diet of nuclear loads. You can beat anything to death.

The 1911 was adopted by the military, not because of reliability issues of revolvers, but for the additional stopping power of an 8 round .45 ACP.
 

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Ive never taught a female to shoot that preferred a revolver over a pistol after trying several of both.
Its not that I care what they pick , they just always go to the semi auto. Usually in 9mm.

Reasons given are revolvers are harder to aim, harder to get off a smooth shot due to the long heavy double action trigger pull.

Barring something unusual health wise ive never taught a female that couldnt rack the slide once taught how to do so.

My late wife also shot both 38, 357 mag, 44 mag , 44 long colt revolvers when starting.
Her first choice was a Star 9mm. She could drive tacks with it at 20 yrds.
Over the years she stuck with semi autos in 9mm, finally carrying a Ruger SR9c with a derringer BUG until she became to weak a few months before she passed.

I love revolvers but ive never met a female that didnt wind up choosing a 9mm or 40 SW semi auto for her edc.
 

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The long double action pull will certainly avoid those hair trugger “oops, I barely touched it” of a semi auto when someone is very new and just learning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My wife has significant health issues and one of the places it shows up is "feeling" and strength in her hands. At 2020 PPC competition, she was repeatedly jamming her semi auto due to limp wristing. She had to finish with my comp gun, longer barrel, lighter springs.

She's now carrying LCR 327. While the DAO pull is a bit harder, we had it smoothed out, and she's reasonably accurate with the LCR.

Competition, I may go back and load some 147 grain for her. I still have a handful of SWC 9mm I could load up for her and probably use my comp gun too. But, she may struggle during semi phase. She does have a tricked out 686, IF she can hold it. HAven't been to the range in over a year.
 
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