Why a three die set?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by amstutz, Apr 14, 2014.

  1. amstutz

    amstutz New Member

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    I am wondering why a hand loader would buy a three die set for loading 9mm (or any pistol cartridge). I thought that a final run thru a crimp die was necessary to insure proper chambering of a cartridge. MY UNDERSTANDING is that a three die set (without a crimp die) will not produce a usable cartridge. SO, why so many three die set being sold????
     
  2. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I use a Redding 3 die set for .44-40. The brass is very thin at the neck and with the 3 die, although it is an extra step, it produces ammo that is simply perfect. For Mass producing 9x19, it would not be necessary, but for competition grade ammo, they are a must.
     

  3. BtDoctur

    BtDoctur New Member

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    the 3rd die is the bullet seater/crimper. Comp shooters use the crimping die in most cases for that perfect cartridge.
     
  4. therukh

    therukh New Member

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    3-Die Set

    I now use Dillon exclusively so I can't really address 3-die sets without a crimp die. I like the idea of my Dillon using the third-die taper crimping the 9mm or any semi-auto pistol round. I have used other brands and die sets in the past and found that seating and crimping the bullet in one die didn't work well for me. Of course, for revolver rounds, a roll crimp is nice to keep the bullets from backing out of the brass, especially for heavy recoiling rounds like magnums, but I like seating the bullet first and then crimping the round last. I used my Square Deal press till I wore it out from use and Dillon replaced everything on it for free and I'm still using it. I have absolutely no problems with the rounds it produces. They work every time. I don't understand why one would buy a 3-die set that didn't have a crimp die.
     
  5. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    What I don't understand is why die makers make a combination seat/crimp die when they all acknowledge that a separate crimp die is the best way to go.
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The 3 die set DOES contain a crimp die. The crimp feature is incorporated into the seating die. I prefer to do taper crimping in a separate step. This can be accomplished by screwing the seating stem in far enough that it does not crimp and then screwing the stem out and the body in to crimp. As I use a progressive press, I just get a separate taper crimp die.

    Ideally a 4 die set is best.
     
  7. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

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    I use a Hornady 3 die set for 9mm. I've never had a problem with any of my ammo loading. I'm just taking the belling out from the powder drop die and putting on a taper crimp.
     
  8. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I'm never in a rush when reloading. I'll also probably

    never progress past a single stage press. But I crimp

    as a separate step.

    I guess if you reload at a faster rate, the seat/crimp

    die is better.


    I guess a lot depends on whether you reload for enjoyment,

    or to create massive loads of ammo.
     
  9. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    I enjoy creating massive loads of ammo. :D
     
  10. amstutz

    amstutz New Member

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    Thanks very much all good information
     
  11. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I use a three die set for most of my reloading. I use a progressive for 45 ACP. I use a single stage for everything else. I can go through 200 rounds in a single competition. Plus I try to shoot once a week on my own. There is another 50-100 rounds. So I probably shoot 400 to 600 rounds in a month. That is just in my competition guns.

    When I shoot at an IDPA or USPSA match it is not uncommon for me to have two rounds within an inch of each other on 10-15 yard shots. And that is shooting pretty fast. That is plenty accurate for me.
     
  12. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Setting a crimp/seat on one die can be tricky if you don't understand that your not crimping... crimp is a bad word to use since it implies your pinching the case into the round. The case should never be "crimped" smaller than the original sized diameter.

    Some dies offer rolling capability and even that is often waaaaay over done.

    A roll "crimp" should only be rolled .010 or less into a canelure bullet only.

    Bullets are held in by friction only never by the crimp. Roll crimping on cannelures prevents bullet setback or the bullet pulling out on recoil.

    Taper crimping returns a belled case mouth to the original sized diameter.

    Reducing the diameter of the case mouth by "crimping" below original diameter actually loosens the bullet and then bad things occur
     
  13. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Cuz some folks are just to cheap to buy a three die set!:D

    You can set the combo die to seat, but not crimp. then when all rounds are seated, you can back the seating stem out and use the crimping shoulder in a separate operation.

    PITA, but if you're going for cheap it works.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2014
  14. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    But not all 3 die sets are created equal.
     
  15. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Very true..