Who voted No to limp wristing, will you please stand up!

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Mercator, Jun 14, 2014.

  1. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    Who voted NO on limp wristing, will you please stand up!

    This thread is secondary to the Limp Wristing poll earlier in the section. I am just curious to know who voted NO with me (three folks).
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2014
  2. jimmyp7162

    jimmyp7162 New Member

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    I didn't vote but I actually tried limp wristing on purpose with my beretta px4 compact. No issues whatsoever after 30 rounds.


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  3. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    When people try to demo it and prove it, they often succeed because of shooter's bias. Give the gun a small impulse, and you alter the cycle.
     
  4. Point6liter

    Point6liter New Member

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    My wife has been shooting for the last few years now, fairly regularly. I recently watched her limp wrist my glock 19 so bad that the spent casing hit her in the forehead, and the next round FTF'd. (I have no idea wtf was going through her head at the time) I have never ever had any kind of failure through that gun in at least 2k rounds. So I definitely believe in it causing failures.

    Edit: it was @ 10yds and the round hit dead nuts right in the center of the X. As usual.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2014
  5. jimmyp7162

    jimmyp7162 New Member

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    I believe it certainly can cause failures, I just couldn't get any is all.


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  6. Mouser

    Mouser Active Member

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    I suspect I am one of the three...I do not believe limp wristing is a root cause of failure. I am surprised that so many would believe operator error over mechanical failure on a precision mechanical device such as a gun.
     
  7. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    This is not often caught unrehearsed on camera, but you will see it at a public range occasionally. Often the shooter is a small woman, new to guns. After experiencing recoil a few times, notice how she plunges the pistol forward as she pulls the trigger. That's recoil anticipation. The move is a conditional reflex to protect yourself from an imminent hit.

    Two things are needed to break it: 1- mental: stop worrying about recoil, and 2- physical: lock your wrist. Because it works, people assume the wrist was "limp". In reality the wrist was jerking the gun.