Who here actually trains regularly?

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by Mule659, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. Mule659

    Mule659 New Member

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    When I say this, I mean gets training from a professional instructor, or group of professionals. I personally don't consider just blasting through a bunch of ammo in my back yard training. I realize training is expensive, but so are medical bills and/or funeral expenses. I try my best to attend courses fairly regularly ( 3-4 a year, plus whatever I can get my agency to pay for) with instructors far beyond my skill set. My next course is a building clearing/fighting course with a former SEAL and Green Beret.
    When training on my own, I like to set out with a specific goal in mind. Drawing from concealment, multiple targets, accuracy, using cover, building clearing, fighting from a vehicle, low light/no light, weapons transitions, malfunctions, etc. I always like to train with others who serve as a safety officer and can call out various scenarios on the move. I also try to video and definitely log each training so I can mark profess. I'm fortunate enough to have a great range and people willing to train at almost any time. Anyway, what does everyone's training consist of? Any good drills you'd like to share with everyone else?


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  2. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Training for self defense is not a martial art. If you are a veteran or a competitive shooter you have had enough training to set up your own drills. You can buy Jeff Cooper's books so you understand how training works. While Cooper's original drills may not be the best training methods, all other training methods evolved from Cooper's work.

    Training with a green beret might improve your tactics or speed a little bit. The primary job of a special forces soldier doesn't involve shooting a weapon. Combat is nothing like you have seen on TV or call or duty.
     

  3. Mule659

    Mule659 New Member

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    I served four years in the Marines as a grunt. Pushed from Kuwait through Baghdad my first tour as part of a Scout Platoon. Next two tours were in Fallujah during the brutal fighting for that city. Granted that has been a while back, but I'm fairly versed in real-life combat, Having engaged enemy from point blank with my handgun out to a few hundred yards with my rifle and crew-served weapons...so I don't pull my experience from TV or Call of Duty. My point was training with guys who devote their entire lives to training to fight can be incredibly valuable. Granted an average person will never have reason or justification to enter and clear a large building, but as a police officer it may very well be something I end up having to do. And those same tactics can apply to clearing your own home. Why not learn the tactics from guys who have been there and done that more times than most people have logged into a Call to Duty account? A book is fine, but nothing teaches you better than a seasoned pro watching and critiquing whatever problems you may be having. And a primary mission of an 18B (Special Forces Weapon Sgt) is knowing and teaching a huge variety of weapons and tactics. I highly encourage anyone who gets a chance to take part in a force on force scenario using simunitions. It is very humbling and will definitely increase your desire to learn.


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    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014
  4. seancslaughter

    seancslaughter New Member

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    I too am a Vet and was also in OIF 1 on the push to Baghdad and Tikrit and I too have had more than my share of combat from house raids/CQB to engaging targets out to about 800 meters with my squad marksmen weapon, and I too feel that training is important to keep your edge sharp. Now that being said do I think it is worthwhile to pay someone to conduct that training with me? Absolutely not I have years of military training to pull from and so do you. Use that training to set your own scenarios up. I understand its hard to set up a cqb course and get simunition guns, but you really could do the same thing with milsim paintball guns much cheaper and that would open more training options up for you as well on the cqb front.
     
  5. seancslaughter

    seancslaughter New Member

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  6. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I know someone very involved in IDPA matches. I think that is some good training.

    I just like shooting holes in paper and making some steel targets spin or ping.
     
  7. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I am a vet myself. We sure didn't shoot it out with anyone when a radio will bring hell raining down on them. Maybe the military has changed over the years but I really doubt it. We had a few cowboys who put us all in danger. They were in Tokyo PDQ getting their foot amputated after they stepped on a toe popper.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014
  8. seancslaughter

    seancslaughter New Member

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    It's a lil different in urban combat and with such a focus on lowering noncombatant casualties although we did rain down plenty of ordinance when there was little to no chance of collateral damage


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  9. Mule659

    Mule659 New Member

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    I would much rather let the air and arty take them out. Buy unfortunately the brass in Washington won't let you just level a city block instead of clearing each building one at a time. At least according to the ROE we were stuck with.

    Anyway, my point of this thread was not to start any form of pissing contest or anything of the sort. I personally feel it is worth the cost to train with the best instructors possible at the best facilities possible. It's fun and may save my life someday. To some people it may not be worth it.



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  10. seancslaughter

    seancslaughter New Member

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    It's just cost prohibitive those courses are not cheap and you can do damn near all of the same stuff on your own for less


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  11. CardiacColt68

    CardiacColt68 New Member

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    I self train to avoid combat. Awareness and avoiding bad places and situations is my method. If I end up in a combat situation I am in big trouble. I am a middle aged sales guy. If the **** really hits the fan, I am hunkering down and calling for help. I can defend myself to a point, but I have not had the time in the military as some.

    And I do not own, play or practice with any video games. ☺️


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  12. seancslaughter

    seancslaughter New Member

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    LOL CC I am sure if such a situation arose you would be the winner. I was not trying a pissing match just putting out my opinion
     
  13. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Last time i cleared a building was a burglery of an unoccupied building. We opened a window hoisted the k9 in and his handler gave it the sic'em command. Burgler popped out the door like magic...

    If someone is in my house im not clearing it im calling 911 and let my tax money do it while i wait in ambush with an ak47
     
  14. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

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    every time I go to the range, it is with particular goals in mind. I would consider this to be training. The more time you spend picking up your weapon and firing, magazine changes, etc, the more this goes to muscle memory. That's the best training anyone can get. it needs to be automatic, if you need to use your weapon for self defense there is ingrained muscle memory.

    as far as spending a lot of money on courses, no thanks
     
  15. Fathead00

    Fathead00 New Member

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    I would love to take some classes, but money is a little tight!!:(
     
  16. seancslaughter

    seancslaughter New Member

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    only class I would like to take is extreme long range classes using high powered rifles like the 338 lapua or .50 cal Barrett but thats about it. I already have done actual urban/CQB, already done large scale firefighting, and already done accurate long distance shooting out to about 800 meters using a hopped up M-14, but I always wanted to hit a target from over a mile away lol
     
  17. Franklin1995

    Franklin1995 New Member

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    That's how I feel too. I figure that the Corps is going to teach me enough about close range and tactics. But I probably will take a extreme long range course. There's just something awesome about the idea of being able to hit that target from a mile.
     
  18. rn-cindy

    rn-cindy Active Member

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    You might be surprised...My LGS/Range offers most handgun classes for $65 + cost of ammo. They run approx 3 hrs...

    * First shots-basic safety
    * Basic handgun
    * Defensive handgun basics
    * Marksmanship fundamentals
    * Tactical handgun 1, 2, and 3
    * Low light handgun
    * Barricade / relative position shooting

    Those are just the ones i have taken, and can remember off the top of my head, but they have others, plus some shotgun and rifle programs. My CCW class was $325, but the rest of them are inexpensive..Call around, might not cost as much as you think...And lots of fun.....:)
     
  19. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No I would not put time and money into training for something that is very unlikely to happen. I go to the range that gets me familiar with whatever firearm I am using that's enough for me.
     
  20. davva360

    davva360 New Member

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    I have taken a couple of classes at the local range. I do like how they move the targets and do low light drills too. Teach you how to use cover properly and things like that.

    I have not been for a while because of the ammo supply issues. Trying to build my stock up a bit so I still shoot regularly to keep things fresh, just not a lot of rounds at once.