Whistle pigs

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by pike, Apr 9, 2014.

  1. pike

    pike New Member

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    We're in the SW Idaho area and so far checking several area's the whistle pig population seems to be way down form last year, and any recent years.
    Anyone else experience this, and how is WP numbers in your part of the world this spring?
     
  2. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Great, now I have to google another thing. Geeze! Lol!
     

  3. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    A woodchuck. What is wrong with saying woodchuck? :rolleyes::p
     
  4. boatme98

    boatme98 New Member

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    Because then, you might have thought this thread was about cider and gotten all excited, only to be sorely dissapointed.
    Nobody would ever mistake whistlepig for a tasty draughty refreshment. :D



    Or would they? Whistlepig Ale?
    Does kind of have a ring.
     
  5. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Wtf............

    What people don't realize, the animals you wipe off the face of the earth could have been your food for tomorrow. Mother nature is coming to pay you a visit, and it ain't gonna be purty......................The OZ has spoken.............I've said this over the last year, Mother nature is coming to reclaim what is rightfully hers..........................Man doesn't belong here................My grand kids are worried about Zombies, lol. Then They ask What If....................I say tighten your belt.......................
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Groundhog population here moderately steady. I have a few farmers that I aid in controlling damage to soybean crops. Used to shoot some of the commercial apple orchards in the Shenandoah Valley of Va.

    My main pig gun has been an older .220 Swift, but this year will be trying the Savage .17 HMR.

    Wills- I am a country boy, and have eaten groundhog- but it would not be my first choice. And the .220 does not leave a lot to cook. :p
     
  7. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    With wolf populations and coyote populations up, I'm not surprised BG dips in woodchuck and prairie dog populations in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.
     
  8. pike

    pike New Member

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    Whistle Pigs in this area are a small verity of ground squirrel that are only out and about 4 to 5 months each year.
    The same name appears to apply to other critters in other parts of the county.
    No, we don't eat them, but they can make for a fun day shooting.

    [​IMG]]
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014
  9. pike

    pike New Member

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    Are you really this daft, or are you attempting to make a joke?
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014
  10. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Leave Wills alone. He is king of cryptic posts. He's just being Wills. If you don't like his posts, put him on ignore.
     
  11. yazul42

    yazul42 Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I've seen plenty of chucks here in n.w. Ohio so far,,, the young ones are tasty,, the adults not so much. I try to slip up on them with a .22 or a bow, a centerfire varmint round as c3 said, leaves little to grill.
     
  12. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I usually shoot groundhogs with a 30/06 or 270. Groundhogs I am interested in killing live in open fields. While the shots are make-able with a 22 wmr I cannot consistently make shots with over a foot of wind drift.
     
  13. yazul42

    yazul42 Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I have to slip up a fence row or slide through some woods to get close enough, most of the time,, unless a buddy has them burrowed in by a barn or an outbuilding,, .223's and .22-.250's are the most predominant cartridges in this area,, using very frangible rounds,, houses all around up here.
     
  14. nchunt101

    nchunt101 New Member

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    I have to disagree. I have eaten a couple we killed out of apple orchards and found them to be better than rabbit.
     
  15. emo

    emo Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Whistle Pig is a very tasty beverage.
    http://www.whistlepigwhiskey.com


    Real Dogs Drool!
     
  16. Holmes375

    Holmes375 New Member

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    Here in Wyoming the whistle pigs are more commonly called rock chucks. I believe they are probably what the OP is talking about. Properly referred to as yellow-bellied marmots.

    Our prairie dogs are often called pasture poodles, prairie rats, and other endearing epithets. PDs can be a source of very challenging shooting if one adheres to self imposed shoot parameters. Great long range targets.

    I've not chased the chucks in several years now and cannot comment intelligently upon their current population status in Wyoming. They're all over the backcountry of Yellowstone but those folks up there get cranky if I start whackin' 'em while kayaking the Lewis river channel... ;)
     
  17. pike

    pike New Member

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    Holmes375 go back and reread post #8.
    To me at least, a rock chuck is marmot and whistle pig is a ground squirrel.
    We we're using 22's for the WP and a 243 for the rock chucks a couple of weeks ago. 80 grains at over 3000FPS seems to work well ;)
     
  18. Holmes375

    Holmes375 New Member

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    Ah, we are indeed calling them different. And I'll bet those 3000 fps 80 grain pills do indeed do the job :D
     
  19. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Whistle pigs, or as known out here Rockchucks, are properly known as "hoary marmots."
     
  20. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We call them groundhogs in my area of Ohio, although I've heard whistlepig used too. I've used .22rifle and pistol, .22mag, .22hornet, .223, along with .410 and 12 guage. Ideal caliber is the mag or hornet, imo.

    I currently have at least two burrowing under buildings, where they can do the most damage. I've weeded out most of the slow ones, creating my own unnatural/natural selection.

    They used to be out of control when I bought my house, which is why I became interested in rifles with more useful range than what a .22lr could provide. My boxer/lab mix and I killed around 170 of them in two years time. I would walk with a rifle, shooting any at distance, and the dog would chase down the sleepy or small ones, breaking their neck by shaking them. He was good for 10-20 a year. Now its around five a year for me, current yellow lab hasn't got any yet.

    So as to the OPs original question, yes the population is down around my area. My influences aside, the red tail hawks population grows every year, and I've had several eagle spottings this year too. I imagine a young groundhog is an ideal meal for both species of birds.

    Edit: I've never ate them, but those who have told me a young one is absolutely delicious when roasted with potatoes, carrots, and onions. The adults tend to get tougher and gamier.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2014