Which "survival" .22 rifle

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by NitroxAZ, Jun 25, 2009.

  1. NitroxAZ

    NitroxAZ New Member

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    I have been looking around at "survival" .22 rifles. So far I have come across 3 different models and want your opinion on them.

    1. Henry Arms U.S. Survival AR-7
    2. Springfield Armory M6 (out of production)
    3. Marlin Model 70PSS "Papoose"

    Any info would be appreciated.
     
  2. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Can you give us a definition of what you consider 'survival' ??

    Like just hunting the smallest of game from a campsite? Or foraging the wasteland post WW III Mad Max Stylez? :D

    The Henry is a good weapon. Easy to break down, work on and pretty accurate.

    The Marlin is also a good choice. I think it's a little more expensive than the Henry.

    Either of those would be a good campfire type gun.

    JD
     

  3. indy_kid

    indy_kid New Member

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    Other options...

    Look into the variations of the Savage Model 24. These are dual-purpose firearms, with both shotgun and rifle barrels, i.e., .22LR/.410. One firearm for 2 different types of hunting.
     
  4. Water-Man

    Water-Man New Member

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    I'd go with the Marlin. It's based on the Model 60 which is one of the best.
     
  5. NitroxAZ

    NitroxAZ New Member

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    I should have clarified the "survival" part a little more bit thought it was clear with the mention of the .22 rifle. I do mean more of a bugout bag type rifle for foraging for small game.

    I have not seen the Savage rifle. It sounds like the Springfield.
     
  6. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    +10 - Of the three listed the Papoose is the highest quality and most accurate. I've had one for 23 years and it groups as well as any fullsized .22. Of course in 1986 the price was only $100...
    I've heard bad things about the AR-7 (Henry)in terms of accuracy, and for the price that's just not acceptable. When it was made by Charter Arms it sold for $70, now it's almost $200.

    Another option is the Rossi Matched Pair - for under $200 it can be had in .410/.22 or like the one I have in .243/20 ga. The "Youth" model is even better for backpacking with it's shorter stock. Like the Papoose, the Rossi breaks down and packs in a nylon case with both barrels (it doesn't float however).
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2009
  7. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    I had a Savage 24 that was .22mag over 20 gauge and it was the most deadly small game gun I had back then. The .22 short/long/long rifle over 20 gauge would be excellent. It breaks down too.

    Barring that a Browning semi-auto would be ideal-if a bit expensive. Most of the lever actions break down too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2009
  8. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    I have to agree with "stalking bear". My bugout 22 is a browning 22 auto. I have had very bad experence with 3 different AR7 rifles. Two jammed continually only firing 1 shot at a time between jams. The Henry brand has a plastic barrel shroud with plastic sights that continually fall off.The recievers are just a casting of potmetal. Now that instills confidence. The Marlins are somewhat more robustly built however they arent nicknamed "jamomatics"for no reason. As stalking bear states a Savage 24 is a good choice however it could be improved by being built from milled steel and most importantly have the top barrel a 22 long rifle and then get rid of the shotgun barrel and replace it with a 308 win. Now that would be a great all situation survival game getting firearm.
     
  9. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    I've never had any Marlin Mod. 60 action jam. I think this happens to people who are "mechanically & mentally challenged" and just expect their semi-auto to give them a lifetime's worth of jam-free shooting without ever disassembling the bolt and cleaning it! Sure it's a pain in the a$$, but it's a mechanism that gets dirty after thousands of rounds of accumulated carbon and cordite- it doesn't clean itself, and spraying the piss out of it with gun scrubber doesn't do squat except consolidate the crap in places where it can't be reached. After 10+ years I completely stripped my old Mossberg and couldn't believe it was still working after the crap I found. Now it doesn't jam, it cycles much faster, and the lag time between when the trigger is pulled and when it fires has been cut in half because the firing pin is not riding in a slurry of carbon and lube.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2009
  10. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    I know what you mean about dirty self loading rifles. I regularly clean and repair many firearms every year. I actually removed tree branches from a the magazine well of a Winchester model 54. However have had problems with the Marlin 60 series firearms if not kept spotlessly clean. Quite a few gunsmiths got rich trying to keep them operating. Though they can be reliable when cleaned, in a survival situation cleaning is not always an option and it is too complicated for most to work on in the field. This is what my opinion was based on.
     
  11. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    I have the Henry AR-7 and if I were you I'd get the Marlin.
     
  12. opaww

    opaww New Member

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    I have a Marlin mod.-25 bolt action .22lr that will go with me come hell or high water. It does not break down for easy portability but it's one hell of a shooter. Had it for about 30 years now and cleaned it for the first time last month when the bolt started sticking. Sense I cleaned it last month I should be good for another 30 years
     
  13. AsmelEduardo

    AsmelEduardo New Member

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    Rossi Matched Pair or Trifecta.

    +10 on that.. but I do prefer the .22lr/20ga. Matched pair. Rossi is offering now what they call Trifecta, wich is 3 barrels combo.... .22lr/20ga/.243, that would be nice.
     
  14. Water-Man

    Water-Man New Member

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    ++1. Throw in lazy too!
     
  15. indy_kid

    indy_kid New Member

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    Even more choices...

    I own a Papoose, which is just a Marlin/Glenfield Model 60 that you can break down. Never had a problem with it or the regular Model 60 that I owned. Keep them clean and you're okay. Also, make sure the feed ramp is well-polished. [NOTE: Charter Arms made a version of the AR-7 and one called the Explorer II. They appear to have identical parts, but the barrels are NOT interchangeable.]

    IMHO, the primary cause for FTFs is cheap ammo. Those irregular cast bullets are notorious for snagging on the feed ramp. If you can find FMJ .22LR or copper-washed .22LR, that's a step up.

    You didn't indicate how much you had to spend, or how long you expected to be in the field after TSHTF. Both the AR-7 and the M6 were designed for short-term use; just long enough for the Rescue teams to find you and haul you out of the jungle.

    The reason I'm not fond of the Rossi pairs is the need to swap out. With the Savage 24 (in your calibers of choice), it's a flick of a switch to change barrels. I don't agree with ditching the shotgun for a .308; it would be hard to hunt bird with either a .22LR or .308! Again, you might be stalking squirrel and have the hammer selector set for the .22LR when you suddenly kick up some quail! A flick of the selector and you have the shotgun ready to go!

    You could cut down the 24 to 16" or 18" barrels and replace the stock with a folder to make it more portable. However, you'll lose accuracy by doing so.

    There are other multi-barrel guns beside the Savage 24. There are European "Cape guns", commonly chambered in 9.3x74R and 16-gauge (other combinations are available). There are even three-barrel "Drillings":

    * Two matching shotgun barrels and a rifle barrel
    * Two matching rifle barrels and one shotgun barrel
    * Two rifle barrels of different calibers (typically one rimfire and one centerfire) and one shotgun barrel
    * Three matching shotgun barrels
    * Three matching rifle barrels

    Those will run into the thousands, but I wanted to point out their existence in case you expect something like a months-long or years-long collapse of society.
     
  16. Bigcat_hunter

    Bigcat_hunter New Member

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    How about a feather USA Rav22? I have sold lots of there 9mm versions and people are very happy with them. The gun brakes down into a small carrying case. They are kind of like grease guns. I personally have never fired the 22 version but can vouge(sp?) for the big brother 9mm. I have one and love it. The 22's receivers are made of aluminum and the gun weighs next to nothing. I have one on my site but you can get a better view in feathers site which is;

    Home

    Some that they show on their site are pretty mall ninja'd out but the basic version should be on there somewhere.
     
  17. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    I'd love to have one - but I'll never spend that much on a .22.
     
  18. AR762

    AR762 New Member

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    In my opinion, I would only have a bolt action .22lr rifle, with a sling and a composite stock, as a survival rifle for small game use.

    My past experience with .22lr. is, Semi's can be ammo sensetive and have failure to eject or feed.

    I own a semi-auto and a bolt action, in .22lr. My bolt action will eat whatever, I feed it, and has less moving parts.

    I also keep a M16 cleaning kit with it. I bought an extra cleaning rod section, a commercial adapter, with a brass patch holder so, the muzzle will not become prematurely worn, due to cleaning.
     
  19. DSAPT9

    DSAPT9 New Member

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    I like the Papoose and own 2 model 60s myself but my favorite is my youth model 10/22 16.5 bbl with a butler creek folding stock. Small light and 25 round mags that work. In my bug out bag I carry a 4in Ruger MK II not a rifle but a good survival tool.
     
  20. jeffware

    jeffware New Member

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    survival .22 rifle

    mr nitroxaz, i have given much thought to the ultimate .22 surv rifle. i like a ruger 10-22 stainless with synthetic stock. the factory magazine is 10 rounds and fits into the stock flush. higher capacity mags are easy to get in capacities of 25 rounds (and more). these mags stick out below the weapon like military style weapons. i feel that ruger makes superb quality stuff, and the aftermarket parts supply is good. it is my surv gun. jeff.