which reloading press is for me.

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by moneymaker17, Feb 20, 2011.

  1. moneymaker17

    moneymaker17 New Member

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    what will be the best reloader to reload 30-06 , 444 marlin and a remington 700 7mm mag/ and 12 guage shotgun. can someone help me out. thanks

    btw im still doing my research im not going to just throw some black powder in a casing with a primer and see how she does. im going to research and read books. but i need some advice!
    Thanks again
    -Brett
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    rcbs makes really nice starter kits for single stage loading. cheap easy to start. mec makes cheap shotgun loaders.

    my pref is for the dillon stuff but its a bit pricer but more user friendly.

    others will have different opinions.
     

  3. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

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    Any good single stage press like the RCBS kit mentioned will handle all your metallic cartridge needs. A progressive press will be faster, but they are more expensive, a little harder to set up/maintain, and aren't as quick to change calibers. You shouldn't need a progressive however unless you are going through hundreds of rounds a week.

    Shotgun is going to require a different press setup.
     
  4. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I started with the RCBS kit and expended form there. Worked out good for me.
     
  5. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

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    Dillon 550 for metallic reloading and Mec 650 for shot shells will be adequate unless you going into high-production mode.
     
  6. noylj

    noylj Member

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    Shotgun shells need a different press from metallic cartridges.
    Read a couple of manuals and determine for yourself what you need.
    Metallic:
    How many rounds?
    I consider the Lee Classic Turret to be about as good as one needs for loading rifle cartridges.
    A single-stage press is OK. I would recommend the Lee Challenger, the Hornady L-N-L classic, or the Forster Co-Ax (in order of cost and "niceness").
    I don't consider bottleneck cartridges as being very applicable to a progressive press. A progressive lives up to the manufacturer's claims only if loading straightwall cases.
    I consider the Hornady L-N-L AP to be the equal of any progressive currently on the market, except the Dillon 1050 and other "commercial" level presses. It is the best progressive I have ever used without a case feeder. With a case feeder, I would go with the Dillon 650. If I was going to load several cartridges on the press, though, I would quickly go back to the Hornady.
    Shotgun:
    In general they are either relatively inexpensive and barely adequate or they are expensive and complicated. MEC has always been the brand to compare other presses against.
     
  7. moneymaker17

    moneymaker17 New Member

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    i only go out and shoot about 20-50 at a time. in one month. i dont need anything to reload 500 rounds, iid just like to save money. (3 boxes of ammo=120.00)
    so my second question is. what exactly will i need? brushes? tumbler?
    how would i measure the black powder you put in the brass? just curious on a couple of things
     
  8. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Moneymaker,

    As the guys have stated there is a Press for Shotgun and a Press for cartridge weapons. I would suggest you start by buying the RCBS Rock Chucker Kit as they mentioned if you are serious about reloading. It is a basic press and will last you a lifetime if you take care of it. Mine is at least close to 30 years old and still works. And you can get parts for them if you need them. Plus die availability is almost unlimited. I load everything with it from 38 ca. Pistol to 7 MM Remington Mag. Rifle. Can't beat it!
    Good luck but buy quality equipment! I recently splurged and after all these years I bought a Lyman 1200 Auto Powder Measure! It is the best money I have spent and sure saves time and my eyes since I was still using a standard (Balance Weight) powder scale and those lines start to fade together if loading a lot of rounds.

    03
     
  9. Eric0424

    Eric0424 New Member

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    I would suggest you start with buying the Lee and Hornady reloading manuals then reading them, most of your questions will be answered in them as well as a lot of other things you'll need to know. Then start looking into a single stage press or kit, with the amount you shoot you won't need a progressive or turret press. That will help with metallic reloading, I don't know much about the shot-shell reloading.
     
  10. OldManMontgomery

    OldManMontgomery Member

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    Yes. Reloading Manuals

    I suggest the Lyman (latest edition, 49 I think.)

    Read the introduction part, not the loading data. This will give you an idea of what you are getting into and an idea of what you'll need. And if it scares you off, you're only out the price of the manual - which is valuable information even if you don't reload.
     
  11. Thebiker

    Thebiker New Member

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    I'll kick in a vote for the RCBS Rock Chucker. That's what I started with and if you want to get in cheap, you can sometimes find them used for a song.

    The RCBS kit, however is a decent bargain and you get everything you need to get started in a painless manner. If you start reloading, you will probably find that you shoot more because it costs less to shoot more rounds....:rolleyes: and so it begins.

    If you find you enjoy reloading, (many do but some don't), then expand to shotgun or to a progressive press (or both) as needed. If you go progressive, I will endorse Dillon. Great presses and even better support. They just went through my 19 yr old Square Deal, replaced all worn parts and upgraded other parts that had been re-designed over the years for the cost of a clean & lube of the press ($25.00) with no charge for parts and did in it 6 working days. That's service to write home about!

    The reading material recommended is spot on and there are also DVD's available from different companies (Cabela's has some) and manufacturers that might help as well as on-line tutorials (Hornady is quite extensive) plus what can be found just by going to Bing.com and typing in "How to reload ammunition".

    Good luck and happy reloading.
     
  12. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Rock Chucker or Reloader special for rifle loading and a MEC press 600 Jr. Is a good solid starter press. I know a guy that had 6 MES 600's One for him each of the kids and his wife. They would hold a huge part every 4th of july and the month before they family would sit out in the reloading room and load like hell. We would burn up every last shell they could load too shooting skeet.

    I am currently working on a big article about this very subject. Should be done in a couple of weeks I hope.
     
  13. moneymaker17

    moneymaker17 New Member

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    so now what if i wanted to get a speed loader. because i have looked into it. and i mine as well spend some extra money and get the good stuff. im looking to buy tge tyrret press deluxe reloading kit.

    good bad? tell me about it.
     
  14. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Turrets are faster than a single stage as you can put all your dies on one turret For rifle you can put your sizer and deprimer then a powder measure then a seater die for 2 different calibers on each turret.

    The produce good ammo and allow ease of use plus single stage precision.
     
  15. Eric0424

    Eric0424 New Member

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    If you're talking about the Lee turret press kit, I would suggest the Classic over the standard turret press. The press in the Classic Turret Press Kit is a much stronger press and will have the capacity to reload the longer rifle rounds. The press in the Deluxe kit won't reload rounds like the 30-06 and 7mm Rem-Mag with the auto-index feature enabled, you'll have to use it like manual turret or single stage press. The standard turret press also has an aluminum base, handle and some of the linkage is aluminum too. The Classic Turret Press has a cast iron base, steel linkage and handle, just a much stronger press overall and you will be able to use the auto-index with your longer rifle rounds.

    The kit linked above is a [​IMG], I bought mine about 5 years ago and it's been a great press for everything from 9mm Makarov to 270 Winchester. It's about twice the price of the Deluxe kit, but you get twice the press. You also get the Pro Auto-Disk powder measure, it's a little more user friendly than the regular auto-disk measure.
     
  16. moneymaker17

    moneymaker17 New Member

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    Cabela's: Lee Classic Turret Press Reloading Kit


    thats what i bought. now what else do i need to start reloading, besides from the primers and bullets?
    im going to buy the master book that tells you what the specs are and everything. but for now i just bought the press, (its on back order) :( oh well.. lol
    Thanks guys!
     
  17. Eric0424

    Eric0424 New Member

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    You'll need a set of dies for each cartridge of course, and to keep costs down I would wait for the manual and see if you can get one powder to load all three cartridges. Sometimes it's hard to find a load with certain powders, I had this problem with my 9 Luger, 9 Makarov and 45ACP. I would have a bottle of powder that would work with two of three, but couldn't find a load with the weight bullet I wanted to use on the third cartridge. If you plan to order your primers and powders online, I would try to get them at the same place, that way you'll just have the one HAZMAT charge.

    You may need the case trimmers as well, the Lee case trimmers are cheap at about $5 each, but a little slow in trimming. A few other items like a deburring tool, primer pocket cleaners if you're using once-fired brass. A set of calipers will be needed to measure cartridge length, case length etc. etc, Cabela's has a set for $25, Lyman has some for about the same price.

    I'm sure there's a few other items you'll need to get started, but I can't remember what exactly. I'll have to compare the kit you ordered with the essential tools needed to get some ammunition loaded.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2011