Which Press is right for me? The Answer.

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by cpttango30, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I guess if you are pursuing accuracy, and don't want to send a mint to

    Hornady, Barnes, etc,(et al) you will probably get into reloading, if you're

    handy, and enjoy this kind of thing.
     
  2. ktmboyz

    ktmboyz New Member

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    GREAT post Tango,,

    I have been looking into reloading and not sure what press to go with and how much to dump into the initial investment. All of your threads in this section have been very helpful. Props to you,, and a big thank you
     

  3. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Thanks KTM. That is what I am here for to help all I can help.
     
  4. Sonnypie

    Sonnypie New Member

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    I suppose most think they will save money. And likely so.
    But Dad and I reloaded for the ability to make sure every step was as accurate as we could possibly make it.
    If the powder charge is exact, if the bullet weights are the same, if the primers are all the same batch, the primer holes are correct, and the planets are all in align....
    If you do it yourself... you need look no further than the mirror to see who went wrong. :eek:
    If everything you do reloading is consistent and correct, there will be less to open up those shots in the groups.

    Accuracy begins at the reloading bench.
    If things are not accurate there, they won't be down range either.

    I use a one stage press. Because I am focused on one step at a time. And I want that step to be as accurate as I can humanly make it.
    48 grains of powder, or 47 grains of powder, is NOT the same as 47.5 grains of powder.
    Science and loading data mean little if you do not do the work to find that "perfect" load for your firearm.
    I use 3 different presses. One Step old Herter's. A RCBS progressive. And I have a Lee hand press I used for 9mm.
    I don't use all 3 regularly, but I could in a pinch. ;)
    I'd encourage a single stage to begin with. Get good with it. Get accurate with it. Testing your reloads will naturally bring you back to the bench with renewed experiance.
    Once you have your "perfect" round, your search will be over in the experimental mode. And by then, you ought to be a damn good shot from the practice. :rolleyes:
    I like RCBS equipment. I recommend it. But nothing is worth nothing until you are satisfied with your results.
    If money is tight, or the household accountant is a problem, start out with a Lee nutcracker. You can move the dies to whatever next press you decide to buy. And you will never lose the experiences.
    But not taking that step into reloading is like saying, I hit the gong and being satisfied with that.
    To me, cutting that tiny x out of the bulls eye with 3 well placed shots at 200 yards is accurate.
    Doing it time after time takes accuracy at the reloading bench.
    Whether is is X, Y, or Z reloading press.
    Where you step into the waters is completely up to your budget and family constraints.
    There is no "MAGIC" press.
    Reloading isn't chopping wood. It is accuracy and consistency. It is patience and perseverance. Being that much more dedicated than "Mr. Box Loads" shooter.
    There is your bragging rights. Out shoot them. And because YOU know exactly what the loads you make will do, consistently.
    The temperature, wind, and weather will weigh on all the same. But the accuracy at the reloading bench is what will win the match.
    Arguing tools is like arguing body parts. It's what you can do with the tools that makes it out there where the bullet meets the mark.
    Be the best that you can be. ;)
     
  5. Lukeysh

    Lukeysh New Member

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    For beginners I agree with a single stage. I use the rcbs rockchucker.
     
  6. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I got an old Hornady(Pacific) and a small RCBS, both single stage.

    Couldn't be happier. Can't really speak to the turret or progressive

    presses.
     
  7. Cory2

    Cory2 New Member

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    I'm looking at getting into reloading here soon for the purpose of shooting for cheaper, I realise it will not actually save you money because you are still spending money, just less then you were before (kinda like how this debt ceiling thing worked out). But I posted in here for a reason.


    Would you suggest getting the equipment to cast your own bullets or just stick with buying bullets already made?

    I'm wanting to be able to shoot for as cheap as possible, which is my inspiration for wanting to reload, so I can shoot more. Plus I think it will be fun.


    So, cast my own bullets or just order them? What would you recomend?

    p.s. Great post tango! and I usually have a lot of free time on my hands so that is not a factor in casting my own bullets.
     
  8. Rockyrules

    Rockyrules New Member

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    Reloading to save money...ok maybe!

    PHP:
    Well I always love to read the input every one has ... have to admitt are not many subjects that the guys are just trying to help a guy out. Reloading is one of them....I suppose you can save money in reloading but you will just be producing inferior ammunition like we buy on sale. Reloading is a passion in producing a round of ammunition that is to a higher standard of operation that meets the criteria in which you designed it for. Accuracy, compatability to you weapon. terminal performance and a sence of confidence you will get from development of working up your own round. Each of my weapons has a load worked up for just that weapon to take in the account for its perticular characteristics. The one gentleman is right, that you will sink your money into better and better equipment removing the economics of the reloaded shell. I love it and I seporate it into two operations. Component preporation and the actual reloading of the perticular caliber. I wish all of you the best of luck in this endevor but PAY ATTENTION...Loading proper powder measurements is critical....lets no one get hurt!....God Bless You And God Bless the USA!
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2011
  9. Rockyrules

    Rockyrules New Member

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    Reloading to save money...ok maybe!

    [email protected]
    Well I always love to read the input every one has ... have to admitt are not many subjects that the guys are just trying to help a guy out. Reloading is one of them....I suppose you can save money in reloading but you will just be producing inferior ammunition like we buy on sale. Reloading is a passion in producing a round of ammunition that is to a higher standard of operation that meets the criteria in which you designed it for. Accuracy, compatability to you weapon. terminal performance and a sence of confidence you will get from development of working up your own round. Each of my weapons has a load worked up for just that weapon to take in the account for its perticular characteristics. The one gentleman is right, that you will sink your money into better and better equipment removing the economics of the reloaded shell. I love it and I seporate it into two operations. Component preporation and the actual reloading of the perticular caliber. I wish all of you the best of luck in this endevor but PAY ATTENTION...Loading proper powder measurements is critical....lets no one get hurt!....God Bless You And God Bless the USA!
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    is that a typo??

    in general even the noobest of handloaders produces ammo more consistant than premium shelf ammo.
     
  11. ennbee15

    ennbee15 New Member

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    Gotta be a typo. New reloader here. I found my handloads more accurate than the store bought. My groups were very tight. Normally I'm a shotgun group pistol shooter. Lol
     
  12. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I would recommend reloading to anybody who can stand to do it.

    The information in a good reloading manual alone is almost

    priceless.
     
  13. Rockyrules

    Rockyrules New Member

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    Outstanding Tango i really appreciate the info!!!
     
  14. 1982flh80

    1982flh80 New Member

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    Lee Precission

    Just my 2 bits worth. Great writeup on first choice in picking a reloading setup. I agree its all about how much one shoots. For a newbie, in my opinion, a Lee 50th anniversary Breechlock kit is a nice setup. I just purchased a Classic turret press and finished off 200 rds of .45acp in little over an hour and a half. I like it. Oh bty thanks for the input on downloading pics.
     
  15. pagj17

    pagj17 Active Member

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    Tango, thanks for the input, along with everyone else. It looks like I may bite the smaller bullet and start off with the cheapo lee c press, and dies for my 8mm, see how well the 8mm shoots with properly loaded factory ammo. I'll get a better press in a few months, maybe longer, but the lee c press makes a great graduation gift for myself.
    Thanks again. Tango so very helpful.
     
  16. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    There ya go, you're getting the hang of it already.

    Enjoy, and don't forget to enjoy, and did I mention

    enjoy your time reloading?
     
  17. Fumbles

    Fumbles New Member

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    Might as well regenerate this thread a little.Great thread Tango, thanks for the advice.

    About 12-13 years ago I bought a Ruger Super Blackhawk from an Uncle in law :) He "threw in" a complete RCBS Rockchucker single stage kit that he had used for quite a few years. I have never even set it up let alone reload with it. It has almost everything I need, including dies for 9mm, .38/357 and .44.

    I know it has extra's he bought along the way, small hand tools, powder scale, powder measure and stand, a hand primer and even a Lee Loader single caliber complete kit....for .44Magnum. No case tumbler so I'll pick that up when I go buy powder, bullets and primers....as well as a die set for .223/5.56 and a case trimmer setup.

    You said that one will not save money overall. I have wondered about that also as one must consider your own labor I suppose plus supplies, the reloader equipment etc...against the cost of commercial.

    So as far as the reasons to reload. I have read here and elsewhere .......

    Reloading to save a few bucks. Then there is.....

    Reloading for the sheer fun, enjoyment relaxing aspect and personal battery recharging therapy.

    Reloading for super accuracy and consistency between rounds and related stuff....the best deer round, best round for marksmanship, home defense, stopping power, competition reloading like light .38 Super rounds for IPSC etc. Going by memory here. :)

    Am I right so far? Being as I have no practical experience whatsoever.

    All of the above seem aimed at the more than casual shooter who wants to avoid factory/commercial ammo if he/she can help it and shoot a lot of rounds to boot. Also mostly aimed at shooting during periods of a "normal" socio political climate. Non-troubled times.

    But what about a SHTF scenario though? Is it valid to want to learn how to reload consistently well and safely, just in case actually going to a store to buy ammo proves to be impossible, illegal or just plain risky? Maybe the government has procured it all under some emergency statute, outlawed reloading, banned the sale of all ammo...... or there is civil unrest and the gun stores have either locked up and closed or been looted. Maybe leaving one's home at all becomes risky?

    This is what worries me. So my thought is to learn to reload so I can do it well in multiple calibers......... and then stock up with supplies in case I ever have to load my own. In the meantime shoot whatever is on sale or my own reloads...whatever...buy, reload...it don't matter......... based on the reality that I am only going to shoot 2-4 times a month. Mostly 2.

    Does this sound reasonable?

    Well, at least help me out with a justification here! :D You see...........these are the reasons I am giving Mrs Fumbles as to why I have now commandeered a further chunk of real estate in the garage as my own....to make my reloading station. First I built a home recording studio in just less than 1/2 the space...... then I moved in my toolboxes from when I was a pro motorcycle mechanic.......now I am building my own reloading table.

    I'm gettin' the stinkeye let me tell ya!
     
  18. Oldawg

    Oldawg New Member

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    Fumbles....I'm not seeing any replies to your post, so I'll throw in my 2 cents worth. I've been reloading off and on for many years, but had been getting kind of lazy with it, since it was easier to make some good buys at gun shows for my ammo needs. However, after Obama got elected, all shooters went into a panic mode because no one was sure what he was going to do with gun laws and such, and the handgun ammo supply dried up almost overnight. I was thankful I had a fair supply of components, but when I went to stock up with more, I found primers very hard to come by. Also, since I like to be self-sufficient, I went out to pick up some more lead for bullet casting and found everybody else seemed to have the same idea. My usual tire shops that used to give away old wheel weights by the bucketful, were all tapped out.
    Things have eased up now, everything is available again, altho the price has jumped considerably on most components.
    Bottom line...I am now worried this may happen again, maybe much worse than before, so I want to be prepared. Primers and powder will keep for many years if stored properly, so I'm trying to build a good supply of components, just in case.
    I think you have a valid concern. If we don't need the stuff for emergencies, we can have fun shooting it in our old age!
     
  19. budman46

    budman46 New Member

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    cpttango lays it out well. i particularly like his comments on saving money...we could, but always manage to rationalize purchasing more than the savings realized by reloading.

    i've been reloading and casting for 40+ years, starting with lyman/rcbs single-stage equipment because that's what was available. i added dillon presses, a 550 and two square deals in the 80's, when shooting a lot of a few calibers. these days i'm into ww2 milsurps thanks to a c&rffl. i normally load 40-80 rds at a sitting and find lee's classic cast turret press fits my needs better than the single stage 'chucker or dillons.

    the classic cast turret equals/beats my rockchucker, costs about half the price and, with the turret system, is faster without giving up the strength of the 'chucker. it can be used as a single-stage, but i don't know why one would do so.
     
  20. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I reload for accuracy, to make more sedate loads than the

    store shelf, which, IME, is not as well made, and punchy, as

    an "average" load.

    As to SHTF, are you really going to be able to find reloading

    components easier than finished bullets? Wouldn't reloading

    vendors dry up, just like all other supply sources? Sure, you

    could reload, until your first reloading component ran out...