Wheres My S&W Guru????

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by HOSSFLY, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    OK, thought i was pretty fair on the S&W revolvers but i'm confused on this'un:eek:
    Think mabe it a MDL 22 but far from sure--------Mabe sum kinda pre Mdl 10??
    Markins- In crane MABE 85 --under that 64 4 05
    Serial # 702549 (no i aint skart to put the hole number :p)
    Now on the rite side of barrel is very hard to make out- I can see ????76 7" 3.5 TGNS?
    This was my father in laws service revolver way back when he was a LEO up in Missouri-
    Anyone :confused:

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    Last edited: Oct 11, 2012
  2. guncollector

    guncollector New Member

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    sounds like a victory model which was pre model 10
     

  3. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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    That's what I thought but I didn't know victory models came in stainless.
     
  4. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    That another thing, by the way the wrighting is so hard to read i kinda thing it has been buffed hard & then nickled :confused:
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2012
  5. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Didn't think about the Victory - The pre 10 kept comin to mind-
    It & the mdl 22 is all i can recall havin that crazy front site-
     
  6. guncollector

    guncollector New Member

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    pics do not show on my pc sight is semi-blocked but if it's shiney it 's nickled not stainless or chromed out this is my guess based on the limited discription . i'kll work on trying to get the pictures to show and end the guessing the model 22 or pre-model 22 was a large frame that supported the 45 acp and later the 45 colt the weight and cal will determine the model . i still think it's a victory model or a returned lend lease 38 S&w from the war
     
  7. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    As i said its nickled & i'm pretty sure it was either a re-do of just nickle plated at some time- Cal is 38 Special

    Forgot to say- Welcome to our little fire!
     
  8. guncollector

    guncollector New Member

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    wood or plastic grips ? some of the victory models came with plastic like grips . these were issued to war plant security workers, bank guards and the like . some were sent overseas but i believe in 38s&w which the brits foolishly called a 380 which was their cal of chice during the war . they couldnt make enough webleys to keep up with demand
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    The marking is not TGNS but TONS. It is a British proof mark for foreign made firearms, showing the pressure it was test fired to.

    I THINK most Victory models began with the letter V. From the end of the ejector rod, I would say this is likely a Model 1905, which is BEFORE the Model 10 M&P Special, and before the Victory. This MAY have gone to Britain as a Lend Lease gun.

    As noted, that is nicklelplate, and not stainless.
     
  10. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Dang C3 ---Mark as "Nail Hit On Head!"
    Took another look & the V is on the other side of the lanyard from the serial number- Totally overlook it on bottom of barrel too :eek:
    Thanks guys- Was just info to store in my head- This has A LOT of sentimental value to my wife. She learned to shoot with it as a kid (out of 4 girls she was always Daddys Tomboy! ):D I'm making a glass topped display case for it & his badge -
    Thanks to guncollector too! It has wood grips-:cool:
     
  11. BlackWidow

    BlackWidow New Member

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    It is a Model 64-4, stainless steel K-frame .38 Special with fixed sights. Hammer and trigger are hard chromed steel. The lanyard ring was not standard, but the 3" barrel was available from 1974 on. It may have been special ordered for police, corrections, or security personnel. This was a very popular service weapon for police departments before the transition to semi autos.
     
  12. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    This is a S&W Mdl. 1905 H.E. This was exported to Great Britian 1940-1945. This was called the British 38/200 by the Brit Military. Yes, these K Frame Hand Ejectors became Mdl. 10s after 1948. They were returned to the U.S. and sold for $18 bucks in the early 60s. I am presently dealing on a S&W .45 H.E. that went to Merry ole England. These were chambered in the British .45 Enfield Caliber. This is one of my favorite S&W H.E. Mdls.;)
     
  13. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Thanks guys- It is a Victory Mdl - Lanyard is factory, finish ain't, still not sure about wood grips?
     
  14. That 'strange' front sight was the standard front sight for S&W up until the late '40s - early '50s. C3 has correctly identified the revolver.

    One also notes the neat stamp "S&W.38 Special" on the left side of the frame. The original revolver was chambered in .38 S&W - or as our British cousins styled it, .380-200 (200 being the original bullet weight). This stamping indicates the revolver was 'rechambered' (meaning the chambers were lengthened) to .38 Special. Firing standard pressure .38 Special cartridges is reasonably safe, but the base section of the cases expand.

    I have a similar revolver, except when they cut the barrel on my example, they whacked off the ejector rod lug as well. Mine is also nickeled and has genuine imitation stag grips.

    As part of a family heritage that revolver is near priceless. The display case idea is marvelous.
     
  15. guncollector

    guncollector New Member

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    how does one "lenghten a chamber " ? do you mean replace the 38 s&w cylinder with a 38 special cylinder?
     
  16. zombieresponder

    zombieresponder New Member

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    What is stamped into the top or sides of the barrel? What/where are any other markings? My best guess from what's been posted is that it's a .38 Military and Police "Victory" Model. If that's the case, the 2" barrel is rare. Those stocks are not original and came from a much later gun. The nickel finish is not likely to be original, but it is possible.

    The serial number, found on the butt, should also be stamped on the bottom of the barrel(flat part above the ejector rod), on the rear face of the cylinder, and on the yoke. To see the stamping on the yoke, you'll need to use a flashlight and shine it through the chambers. There may also be an "S" stamped next to the "V" in the serial number. It may also be stamped somewhere on the sideplate. If it is, the gun has the "new" style hammer block safety. If it's not there, I'd leave an empty chamber under the hammer for carry or storage.
     
  17. zombieresponder

    zombieresponder New Member

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    The cylinders are the same length. A .38 special chambering reamer would be run into the .38 S&W chamber to make it longer. If you google "SAAMI chamber drawings", you should find a link to the standard chamber drawings that manufacturers use. If you look at the drawings, it will be obvious what has to be done. :)
     
  18. zombieresponder

    zombieresponder New Member

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    I just saw this.

    I have a 1905 M&P in .38 Spl with a higher serial number and no "V" prefix. Mine was made right around the end of 1941, and a gun with a serial number close to mine went to DSC(per factory letter). Mine doesn't have any military or gov't proofs.

    I can't find any reference to 2" barreled .38 S&W chambered revolvers having gone to Allied nations. Strange stuff happened with S&W revolvers though, so.....
     
  19. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Its a 3 1/2" barrel - been cut down - No S