Where is it legal to shoot that is not a range?

Discussion in 'Legal and Activism' started by GREGULON, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. GREGULON

    GREGULON New Member

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    I am trying too be as lawful as I can but have no true idea of where I am able to go and discharge my weapon for practice other than a range that is frankly not cheap. Plus I would like to train more than just sitting at one end and firing at another. What kind of area is it really going to take for me to practice some of the drills I am studying? I live in Oregon FYI.
     
  2. jon1992d

    jon1992d New Member

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    Im gonna jump in on this. I am interested to know the answer aswell.
     

  3. oscar615

    oscar615 New Member

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    National forests
     
  4. seanch

    seanch New Member

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    Do you or anyone you know have a lot of land?
     
  5. gmaster456

    gmaster456 New Member

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    If you know of anyone who lives outside of city limits (the country) ask them if it would be ok to shoot on their property. Maybe do a few favors for them (yard work etc.) in return.
     
  6. GREGULON

    GREGULON New Member

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    National forest area seem good but how do I find out where the boarders are?
     
  7. oscar615

    oscar615 New Member

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    Pick up a map. The borders will be marked and the area will be shaded, usually green.

    Or just go by the nearest forest service office. They will have maps, more than likely for free. While there you can ask them about any specific rules to your area. Like being a 100 feet from a road etc. Or try calling them if you don't know where an office is located.
     
  8. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Around here, old oil well sites (NOT PUMPING WELLS), are a great place to go once you know who owns it. They often have large dirt piles that make a decent backstop. In your area, you could probably look for little owls and shutdown lumber yards outside of town. I have found it wise to ask FIRST when you will be generating sounds of gunfire. Probably want to pick up those cases too.

    edit* are you related to Calculon? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculon#Calculon
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012
  9. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    Your local sheriff's dept has an information phone number, and they should know where they tolerate shooting in their county. Sometimes old abandoned quarries are allowed.

    Federal lands such as BLM and National Forest permit hunting, according to state seasons. The Federal rangers might not necessarily like you using one of those spots as a shooting site just for shooting though. In that case it is best to check at a Federal ranger station.

    So you need to call someone and check in advance.

    Make sure you pick up your brass and don't leave a mess behind. Since you are not paying anyone like you would at a range to clean up after you, you need to remember to do it yourself.
     
  10. downsouth

    downsouth New Member

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    If you live in the Portland area there was a spot just up the gorge in the national forest. That was closer than going past Estacada to the N.F.
     
  11. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    To all- please note that the preceding posts listed National FORESTS.

    NOT National PARKS. There is a difference. Pay attention, there will be a quiz later, and Mr. Ranger does not take well to jokes about Yogi Bear.
     
  12. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

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    Check with the DNR too they have a range by me thats free and they would be able to tell you if any state land was good to use too.
     
  13. Balota

    Balota ... but I used to play keyboards.

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    Several comments about picking up the empty casings but nothing about bullets. Just curious, what happens to the lead bullets that get buried in the dirt. Do they leach lead salts into the ground? Any problems with rainwater runoff? I'm not some anti-gun tree hugger, I'd just like to know.
     
  14. downsouth

    downsouth New Member

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    Back in the 70s the government banned lead in gasoline. It only took a couple of years before there was a huge lead void in the enviroment. Everyone knows that nature hates a vacuum, those bullets are filling the void.

    What happens when you eat, you crap. What happens to that?

    My point being, be as easy on your surroundings as possible but everything we do will effect something.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012
  15. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    There is a range in NorCal that is on BLM land, free to all. It is trashed with all sorts of junk that people bring up there to shoot. Television sets, computer monitors, propane tanks. All sorts of garbage. In addition to that is the brass.

    What I'm leading to is that not only is it polite to clean up your own mess, but why not bring some of that other garbage out of there that other people have left behind? I would make a point of picking up as much brass as I can find as well and bringing it to the recycler where you get paid for it.
     
  16. blkdragon1212

    blkdragon1212 New Member

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    This is a widespread problem, and highlights the need for more private ranges. I agree, using commercial ranges often times can be nearly as much an impediment, as an asset. Limited to slow fire, not being able to move and shoot. In most cases, you can't draw from the holster, and lets not mention drawing from concealment or two gun practice. While this is understandable, especially if you look at the liability issue. If tactical training is your prime focus, you don't need hundreds of yards of range to give you what you want.

    I have recently relocated from Texas, to South Dakota. I am blessed to have nearly six acres, but my tactical pistol and rifle range is twenty five to thirty yards long and just as wide. This covers my tactical pistol and rifle needs.

    My late father, when I was but a lad of ten often called the local Police Chief to let him know that we would be down at the creek doing target practice. I would suggest that you make that contact, or better yet, get with one of the line officers who also shares your desire for readiness. Not only can those guys and gals provide you with good information, but might even allow you to share their range with them.

    I would be willing to bet that you could find a farmer, rancher, with a location that might have a natural or manufactured berm. A few dollars, or like mentioned earlier in this tread, but maybe a little sweat can go a long way. Don't overlook gravel companies as they can give you information where they have abandoned quarries.

    Should that fail, check with some local guys who share your interest some who are on this site, pool your money and rent/buy some land for your shooting club. Safety, as always is the watch word. However some regular dues, and reasonable liability insurance is obtainable. I would suggest some insurance even if you are going to do this on your own. It goes a long way toward getting a Yes! When you can produce that proof of insurance.
     
  17. Durangokid

    Durangokid New Member

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    You have Public Lands in your state like most western states. Go to a BLM office pick up a map and go shooting. :D
     
  18. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Look at getting into one of the shooting sports like IPSC, IDPA, SASS, etc. The local competitions are great places to get much needed practice.
     
  19. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    Unlike out west, pretty much all the land here in the midwest is owned by someone. Here, if you have the landowner's permission, you can shoot in most rural areas.
     
  20. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Dont forget you are responsible for every thing each bullet you fire hits. Public places often have the public just out of eye and ear range but well within bullet range.

    Just something to consider when discharging a firearm.