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Wanting to get into reloading, what is the best set up. Like to be efficient and accurate. I don't know-- is it possible to do pistol, rifle and shotgun with one outfit? Thanks for your experience and suggestions. My comment is considering the possibility of an Obam presidency and the inflation of raw materials and fuel, reloading is a really good investment. I think they will try and make ammunition as hard as possible to get. Thanks for your suggestions.
 

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I would never ever suggest a progressive press for a beginner turret yes but not a full blown progressive .

Shotgun is a separate deal while rifle and pistol can be done on one press with different Die sets .

Go to the Lee website by searching for Lee reloading they have instructions there for many of their products "Including short videos" which will help to give you a rough idea what's what .

All presses can turn out the same quality of ammo it's actually more of matching the correct components with what each particular gun likes than a function of a certain press and Die set .

Lee equipment will work just fine and save you on startup costs and will last for many years especially if you buy one of their new Classic Cast presses that are very strong .

The Lee reloading manual is the most inexpensive yet has all of the information as the more expensive ones "At least where the reloading process itself is concerned" and yes I have a couple of Speer's , the ABC's of reloading and a few other publications to compare it to .

Always stay within a manuals minimum and max load and don't be stupid people blow up guns going both under and over these recommended loadings , under by creating a load that gets a bullet stuck in a barrel and then firing another round and over well thats pretty simple to figure out now isn't it ?

If you want specifics try PMing me or G21 the old boy sounds like he's been in the game quite awhile and knows his stuff pretty well and makes solid recommendations .
 

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:) You start by reading any one of the big four reloading manuals: 'The ABC's of Reloading, Seventh Edition'; 'The Speer Reloading Manual'; 'The Sierra Reloading Manual'; or, The Hornady Reloading Manual'. Don't feel overwhelmed; it's all good, very interesting, reading!

My first press was an RCBS, 'Rockchucker' - One of the big old super heavy ones. I still have it; the factory rebuilt it for me a few years ago; and it, actually, looks new! You can start with a progressive press; but, stay away from anything that's fully automated like my other press, a Dillon XL-650. (Which can be an automated nuisance to run.)

Beware, though! The press you begin with is - in all probability - going to be the same brand that you stay with for the rest of your life! My recommendation for a first press would be a Dillon 550-B. It's progressive; but, happily, it can be manually indexed.

Here's a video tutorial on how to use a 550-B:

XD Talk Video (I always knew the XD Forum would come in handy for something, someday!) :D

By the way, you aren't going to be saving any money; but, you'll learn a very great deal about what makes a gun go, 'bang'; and, reloading is a wonderfully relaxing hobby! ;)
 

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:)
By the way, you aren't going to be saving any money; but, you'll learn a very great deal about what makes a gun go, 'bang'; and, reloading is a wonderfully relaxing hobby! ;)

I have to strongly disagree with you here G21. I save a ton of money over factory ammo, especially match grade .223 ammo. I can reload match quality ammo for about 40% of the cost of factory ammo. The savings is even more significant now than it was just a year ago.
 

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:) I hear ya, RL! The remark is largely facetious. Sure, we all save money on the ammunition - That is when we have the time to reload it. Sometimes, I just have to farm my reloads out to trusted suppliers; otherwise I'd be reloading when I could be sleeping, or shooting, or something. :D

When I walk into our spare bedroom and see the entire room full of reloading equipment, (The custom bench, alone, cost more than $800.00!) I have to wonder what I've really saved over the years?

Somehow, when I finally, 'kick off' I don't see another shooter coming in here and offering my wife anywhere near the $4,500.00 worth of reloading equipment and crated ammunition that's sitting all over the room. My dual drum wet/dry brass tumbler, alone, is worth over $450.00. So, like I said; 'Where's the savings?' ;)
 

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G21

Man you spent alot of money I been reloading long time and casting my own and make my own lube and all i have is 6 die sets hornady LNL progressive press a single stage rock chucker, tumbler , 6 bullet molds a furnace no where near 4500 bucks what the heck you have
 

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Ahhh, ...... More than you! ;)

If what you've stated is all that you've got, then, you ain't got much - Including some rather basic, but very necessary, items. Only 6 die sets? My spare parts boxes for the XL-650 are probably worth the price of one of your presses, alone. (As a matter of fact, I'm sure they are!) :D
 

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:) I hear ya, RL! The remark is largely facetious. Sure, we all save money on the ammunition - That is when we have the time to reload it. Sometimes, I just have to farm my reloads out to trusted suppliers; otherwise I'd be reloading when I could be sleeping, or shooting, or something. :D

When I walk into our spare bedroom and see the entire room full of reloading equipment, (The custom bench, alone, cost more than $800.00!) I have to wonder what I've really saved over the years?

Somehow, when I finally, 'kick off' I don't see another shooter coming in here and offering my wife anywhere near the $4,500.00 worth of reloading equipment and crated ammunition that's sitting all over the room. My dual drum wet/dry brass tumbler, alone, is worth over $450.00. So, like I said; 'Where's the savings?' ;)
Geez David I guess you'd have to reload for quite some time to make up for that investment...I mounted my press to a homemade plywood table top/storage container so i can move it to my hunting cabin when I spend some time there. I only reload for 5 rifle calibers and 4 handgun calibers. My total investment minus ammunition components is less than $1000, and that's long since paid for itself. I only have 2 single stage presses and 1 turret press. I have a $100 Dillon tumbler and a $100 Redding Bench Rest powder measure. It's getting to the point that I don't have the time to reload, so I am considering a progressive like the 650. I always wondered if I would be sacrificing some accuracy by doing so?
 

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RL357

On pistol you wont loose any accuracy if you have a good progressive press like the dillon yur talking about most of them put out a charge + or - a tenth or so I also have a redding competion pistol powder measure that is the best but I have a Hornady LNL progressive and I love it and I added the micrometer for pistol on my powder measure that tunes it in nicely
 

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RL357

On pistol you wont loose any accuracy if you have a good progressive press like the dillon yur talking about most of them put out a charge + or - a tenth or so I also have a redding competion pistol powder measure that is the best but I have a Hornady LNL progressive and I love it and I added the micrometer for pistol on my powder measure that tunes it in nicely
Thanks Frank. Problem is I don't have any real target pistols anyway - except for a Ruger .22, acceptable accuracy for me is at combat distances of 7 yards. My main interest is in rifle shooting, and I strive for sub-moa grouping.
 

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I remember asking those same questions:


:D

Each one gets used-- that RCBS JR is older than me-- still produces great rounds! That little LEE works well too (I use it for crimping).

Once you get going you'll need to buy stock in ammo can companies:
 

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I have to agree with RL357Mag. As much as I shoot, I save a ton of money. That's why I love Lee equipment. It's the most inexpensive and still gets the job done. I load for 8 different calibers (pistol and rifle) and save anywhere from 35% to 75%. The latter is by reloading 357 magnum rounds. I refuse to pay $28-$35 for a box of 50 rounds when it costs me less than $7 to load my own 50.... and if you're not saving at least 45-50% reloading 9mm, then you're doing something wrong. Trust me, I shoot plenty and have paid for my press and equipment many times over. Perhaps, G21, you don't shoot enough. $4500 worth of equipment?.... Wow!
 

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Prices have changed a lot. Have you noticed this thread is 4 years old?:eek:
Yeah, just now... LOL... scrolled to the bottom and just noticed many links. I just assumed they were recent. I guess you just live and learn. I know now to check the date befor posting... thanks.
 

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You will also be amazed at the amount of brass you end up with after a couple of trips to the range too. Save all of the calibers you think you might load later on after you get up and running.

Good luck and be safe!!
 

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i started on a dillon 550b and never looked back wide range of calibers easy to use and change over. accurate powder drop it just works cant ask for more
 
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