When to clean/fix a gun.. or leave alone??

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Trez, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Ive heard cleaning a old can greatly reduce the value... So, how do you know when to clean or repair a old gun?

    I found today in my collection a Winchester model 1895. Its old and rusty, should i fix it or keep it a wall hanger? As well looking on ebay i noticed parts where going for anywhere from $50 to $100, So I was thinking perhaps i could make some $$$ parting it out? ill put a pic up when i find the rest of it. (I remember seeing the parts when i was little...)

    So what do you guys think??
     
  2. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Trez, put up some good quality pics if you're going to sell it for parts. Someone here may want to buy it for a project. Like me for example. ;)
     

  3. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Just my opinion but I would have the gun appraised before I did anything. The appraiser will help you decide whether restoring it, parting it out or just leaving it alone is the better course of action to preserve it's value.
     
  4. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    The folks here will give you the straight scoop on it. Post good detailed pictures and you'll get lots of information and good advice.
     
  5. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Pics of the 1895

    Heres some pics of the 1895... All the parts are there, just surface rust, some pitting where it says " Winchester Model 1895" but is still readable, theres nothing seized up. Barrel meaures 20.5". Doesnt look to have any major pitting. Marked .30 US :confused:. SN# 214xx, a quick search said it was made in 1899.... Looks like it belonged to a ranch as theres a brand on the buttstock ???...... I would like to know more... :confused:
    Sorry, none of the up close pics came out....
     

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  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    How do the barrel, crown and chamber look Trez?
     
  7. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Geez, clean that bad boy w/ some oil and a cotton clothe! Put it back together and squeeze a few rounds off. Run a brush through the bore w/ a little oil and see how it looks. Use a cotton patch also. That is a sweet find, rough, but if it is shootable it may be worth a few pennies. .30-40 would be my guess. That is sweetness under that rust! Don't use anything like steel wool on it.
     
  8. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    Definately nothing can be done to reduce the value of this old gun. It is in "relic" condition. The caliber 30 US is another name for the 30-40 Krag.
     
  9. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    .30 US is the designation for the 30-40 Krag.

    Cleaning and repairing an antique gun is a REALLY touchy subject. Under normal circumstances (unless you are dealing with extremely rare, one of a kind gun or documented historical significance), non functioning guns are Ok to be repaired as long as period correct factory parts (or even better the original parts) are used or fabricated if totaly unavailable, but in selling such a firearm the repairs should be disclosed to a potential buyer. You have to evaluate things one part at a time. For example, if your stock has a split in it but otherwise it's sound, it is better to repair the original stock than to replace it with another even if original. If half the stock is missing then another original stock is better.

    Cleaning of anything that will further degrade the firearm like rust is desirable because if not done it will continue eating away at the metal. In original condition a gun is always worth more IF it's in good shape or exhibits wear to go along with the age of the gun. If you are dealing with poorer examples which already have rust, extreme wear, missing or broken parts etc a good professional restoration job like the ones done by Doug Turnbull
    TurnbullMfg. Co. for firearm restoration of antique guns - antique revolvers, antique pistols - including Winchester rifles, Marlin rifles, Parker shotguns, Colt revolvers, and more
    will greatly enhace the value of a gun, again, unless it is a one of a kind or has historical significance (ex. you'd never restore the gun that killed President Lincoln no matter WHAT shape it's in).

    I'd clean the gun the way I normally would any other firearm that was exhibiting some rust (lightly with some 0000 steel wool soaked in oil) making sure that I removed nothing but the surface rust so there is no further damage, and then asses the gun from there.
     
  10. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Everything looks pretty good on this rifle, all the parts are there, none are broken... Looks like it has just been forgotten about and left without cleaning for years. I havent cleaned it yet, but the gun looks very bring back-able. The barrel seems to have good rifling, good chamber, and no nicks to the crown.

    So .30 US is .30-40 Krag?? Where would i get that? All the shops in town already think im crazy, as I was looking for some 7.7 Jap the last couple of days...:rolleyes:
     
  11. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    While not rare, 30-40 is a mostly seasonal run for Remington, Winchester and others. Right before hunting season it should be plentiful in all the usual online places. I buy it for my Krag and normally find it mid-year in the big, well stocked stores like Cabelas and Gander Mountain, usually left over from the previous hunting season.

    Hornady makes a good 7.7 Jap load that is usually fairly easy to find and not horribly expensive.
     
  12. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    Ps. Ranch brands are all registered. You can find out where it came from but it will take some doing to contact the proper entity in states like Texas, Arizona, Montana etc. Even states like New York register cattle brands. I know because I own the 24th brand registered in that state :D

    If you have ANY clue of potential provenance you can narrow down the search a lot.

    Here is a link on how to read a ranch brand:
    Livestock brands
    Your's looks like a C hanging P Bar to me.

    As an example, here's Nevada's brand catalog:
    http://agri.state.nv.us/Livestock/3rdSupplement08Book.pdf
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2011
  13. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info...
    Ive done a little searching but have come up with nothing... Lots of ranches use some type of CP brand....
     
  14. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Heres some more pics of the 1895... Found on the barrel " Nickel Steel Barrel / especially for smokeless powder"
     

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  15. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    more pictures...
     

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  16. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Even more...
     

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