When the balloon goes up...WILL I FREEZE?

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by CHLChris, Jun 19, 2013.

  1. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    I have heard that there are a few different types of people in a critical situation--when the balloon goes up. There are those who will run away when something bad happens, those who will run toward the chaos to help, and those who freeze.

    I have really never been a part of anything traumatic so I guess I don't know which I'd be. My heart and brain desperately want to be the type who will run toward so I can help. But something happened that makes me wonder...

    I run sound at my church. This is actually a HUGE church and the sound system is so large, it takes two people. I am the #2. During a rehearsal I was messing with something on the board and I caused a feedback loop, which caused the entire building to start squealing louder than you could imagine. Of course, everything and everyone stopped and looked at me with surprised looks. I froze during my adrenaline dump. My brain knew five or six things to do to make it stop, but the immediate stress made me freeze and I was unable to process what to do to stop the squeals. The #1 sound tech had to run over and fix it for me. I was jittery for two more hours, much like after a car wreck. I FROZE.

    How do we know what sort of person we are until something actually happens? This wasn't life or death, but perhaps it opened a window into how I might actually behave in an active shooter or something more personal.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    sure it does

    It happens to even the most well trained. Been in a similar situation at least 3 times,..possibly 4. All you can do is move forward. Nice Piano BTW...But I keep my Guns & my Music Gear separated....More recently where I was living before we bought this house there was a series of Robberies and the complex manager didn't want to do anything About it(even though she lives there too!) so some of us had taken to be around in the evenings. Hope we scared a few robbers away!
     

  3. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Fact.
    And just because someone reacts one way once is no indication of how they will react the next time.
     
  4. johnr1943

    johnr1943 New Member

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    I can tell you from personal family experience ( I am not at liberty to be specific on that one ) that one trained and trained and trained to lead, when tested will lead and involve others to aid - it absolutely works and saves lives.

    In flying I was taught to "Plan flight, fly the plan".

    Example, if I'm driving and have a blowout, I already have a general plan what to do. Another, we trained all three children WHAT to do in case of a house fire and WHERE to meet after exiting. We drilled it.

    Another time, while driving home from school ( they were 15, 12, and 9) they were involved in a very serious car crash, the eldest took charge removed the shaken ones, called 911 and tended my wife (she ended up with 84 stitches, youngest with broken nose and finger) till help arrived.

    My $.02 worth anyhow. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2013
  5. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    I've often wondered the same thing. I don't think I'd freeze, but one never really knows.

    The last time I was in a physical confrontation was about six or seven years ago, when for some reason a stranger (who, though a lot bigger and younger than me, was drunk) started mouthing me in, of all things, an elevator. The final straw was when said something about "four eyes" (I wear glasses) and reached for my head. The next thing I know I have him pinned against the elevator wall by his throat, saying "I'd suggest you shut the f*** up". I never remember moving, or even deciding to move. Then the elevator door opened, with a crowd waiting to get on, and there I am . . . oppps. I let go of the guy, and I and my two now stunned friends sorta slip away . . . .
     
  6. 11B3OJ3

    11B3OJ3 New Member

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    There is a difference in the situations you're talking about. That being, in a nut shell, have you trained and trained and trained until it is muscle memory to fix the sound system feed back problem? My guess is probably not. Yes, some people are naturally more inclined to think quick on the fly and do great things. Is every leo or soldier one of these people? Absolutely not. That is where the repetitive training takes over and auto pilot kicks in. I am an infantryman. I have been on three combat deployments to iraq/afghanistan. I have seen people who I never in a million years thought would freeze do just that and I have seen the exact opposite. Even with the training. There is no real way to know until faced with a situation of that nature. There are ways to increase your chances of acting the way you would like to tho. For what its worth I see a life and death scenario and messing up the sound at a church rehearsal as apples and oranges. Just my 2 cents tho, hope it helps give you some insight.
     
  7. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    My best advice to you is to train for SD situations and have faith!

    You didn't know how to run the audio gear without training and practice & you didn't know how to lead others in prayer without training and practice!

    Get training, practice & have faith.
     
  8. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    You have embraced this and learned from it. Relax.

    As my liberal friend told you about his last I'll tell you about my first. I was leaving grammar school at lunch time and two older kids got in front of me and would not let me go. Dad had trained me at a very early age. I nailed one of the bigger kids in the solar plexus dropping him instantly into the street and the second kid got out of the way. And there in the street was my Mom in the car waiting to take me home for lunch who had seen it all. I think I was seven. She asked what happened and very calmly I explained. I thought nothing of it. She agreed it was right.

    I'd probably be more worried about law suits today.

    By the way, this older kid COMPLAINED that I beat him up and I was questioned when I went back to school after lunch...
     
  9. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    I have always had a strong feeling that those who ask this question (even in they're head) WILL :(
    I also often ask myself when anything like this it asked I ask how the fuk do we know :confused:
     
  10. SSGSF

    SSGSF New Member

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    It is hard to say what one would in a stressful situation. Unless you know how to stay calm in stressful situation.
     
  11. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    All you can do is train and hope your brain falls back on that training.
    ..Doubt yourself now when time moves in...well...Real time and that will be magnified when time starts go move really fast. It's best to get ideas if locking up out of your head.
     
  12. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Bingo...

    The best advice I could give anyone regarding personal defense is to get training in "Personel Defense."

    We all enjoy punching tight shot groups with our favorite toys but there is miles of difference between "shooting" a gun and "fighting" with a gun.

    Those of us who served had the benifit of force on force training, stress training, and one on one engagement training.

    There is a reason Vets carry ourselves a bit different than Civilians, there is a reason that 22 year old Vets enter the workforce and quickly surpass no only their peers but many of their elders. Confidence born of training and the knowledge that if tested, they will react to a problem or a threat is the difference.

    Does not mean you need to run down and enlist or apply for a Commision... I does mean that everyone benefits from training, particularly "controlled aggression" style training.

    I know a lot of people who are very good with their .380 pocket gun... and if charged by a screaming lunatic most of them would shat their britches, catch a beating, and "hopefully" survive and maintain control o their gun.

    Case in point... George Zimmerman

    Tack
     
  13. BeyondTheBox

    BeyondTheBox New Member

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    I've never wondered this myself. Not because I'm sure which category I fall under, but because I just don't care.

    I'm either dead or alive, no matter the case, so the specifics aren't of any consequence.

    I say don't worry, just go with your gut in every situation and be honest with yourself about it. There's no shame in any reaction!
     
  14. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    The reason I think about it is because my heart very much wants to be the type that immediately goes to the aid of my fellow man. I already do when I have my full faculties. I guess I am mostly thinking of what I might do when the adrenaline gets dumped into the veins.

    There are many of you here that are very encouraging!

    Something I REALLY want to get into more is competition. At least that is getting experience in decision-making and (sort of) threat assessment while being stressed at some level.
     
  15. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    Just read an article on this in WESTERN Shooting Journal. How & why one man used Competition(pistol) as training....
     
  16. PappaJim

    PappaJim New Member

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    The best advice I can give you about finding out if you will stay calm in an emergency situation, is to talk to your local fire and sheriffs departments. Most towns now days have some sort of volunteer medical/rescue response team. Your local fire department or law enforcement should know if there is one near you. I don't know what the requirements to join are in each state but in Minnesota it is usually a 110 hours of class room learning and then passing a state given written and skills demonstration test. I retired from ours after 15 years. I saw many new people who thought they knew
    how they would react to an emergency situation learn new things about themselves. Some were right and handled it well, and the confidence they recieved from it extended into other parts of their lives. But some others did not handle the stress well and they left the group after a short time. I understand that how one reacts to the stress of an emergency situation does not translate exactly to how they will react to the stress of a self defense shooting, but it might give you some level of insight into how you would handle it.
     
  17. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Chris,

    Check out Douglas Ridge Gun Club in Estacada. Before moving across the creek, I used to shoot NRA action pistol competitions up there. Have not been in many years but it's a great competition for "from the holster" training, employs tactical reloads, and really pushes your skill in speed and acuracy "while under stress".

    If I remember correctly, you need about 150 rounds. A "major caliber" gun, 9 mm or bigger with minimum 6 round mag capacity, at least 2 back up mags, and a holster suitable for CCW. No red dot's, race guns, or quick competition holsters.

    It's geared for helping CCW citizens improve there skills.

    Used be held on the third Thursday of every month at 6:30 pm

    Give em a call... and let me know... I may just find time to join you. ;)

    ....also, when I was going, membership was not required and I believe it was 5 or 10 dollars to compete.

    Tack
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2013
  18. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I made promises to myself to protect what is mine and my family's.

    I have been to training. I have been exposed to some situations where training took over. And afterwards, I have also felt some regret for things I should have done that my training did not provide for.

    Mindset, training, focus, and self-preservation are strong things.
     
  19. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    Tack,

    Sadly just USPSA events on Saturdays. I think I may need to get involved, though. I think just jumping in with my Glock 23 with factory sights and a simple Blackhawk paddle holster is about the best I could do.
     
  20. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    Train, practice, have faith..........you'll be just fine!