What would be any tip of concern of firing a hundred year old pistel

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by MrDutton892, Apr 18, 2013.

  1. MrDutton892

    MrDutton892 New Member

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    I was wondering if there would be any concern fir shooting a hundred year old revolver
     
  2. rhyno13

    rhyno13 New Member

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    Yeah there can be some serious concerns. I would have it thoroughly checked out by a qualified gunsmith before I fired it.
     

  3. MrDutton892

    MrDutton892 New Member

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    Ok I know through inspection we noticed a couple parts worn down a bit
     
  4. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    It wud help to know--Maker- Style- Caliber?
     
  5. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Remember that .38 does not mean .38 special may be correct ammo.

    Get the correct ammo! (After having it checked out)
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    1. That you have the correct ammo, in the correct caliber. Would refrain from any +++PPP+++ fodder for that one.
    2. Timing is good, lockup of cylinder when in battery is good.
    3. Condition of forcing cone and bore.

    And FWIW, I have one .22 revolver that I shoot now and again that is older than the .22 LR cartridge. WELL over 100. It is in good shape, shoots fine. With Shorts.
     
  7. duddie10

    duddie10 New Member

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    You have a pic? I just love old guns. Every one here is right take a good amount of precausion when firi g old guns. Check what caliber it is the metal fatigue and any signs of aged stress. A good smith could tell you if shes good to go and most of them could recomend how to make or where to get ammo for the firearm.
     
  8. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    First and foremost, check the gun for functioning. Make sure the cylinder rotates and locks up tight. Make sure the hammer stays cocked and does not fall without pulling the trigger.

    Examine the bore and chambers carefully. Older revolvers were fired with mercuric primers, and the mercury causes the steel to deteriorate.

    If all seems well, fire the gun using blackpowder ammunition or smokeless ammunition that is the mildest available. Smokeless was in use a hundred years ago, but if you gun is much older, confine it to blackpowder ammunition.

    If you're in doubt about anything, have a gunsmith check it over, and heed his advice!

    Bob Wright
     
  9. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    I have shot way over a hundred guns that were made hundred years ago(or more). Your question can hardly be answered unless we know what gun it is. Is it a muff pistol? A dueler? A Colt Cloverleaf? A Colt Pocket? A Merwin and Hulbert? A Remington Smoot?
     
  10. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    That is what I was referring to -
    It's like asking if expired milk is ok to drink .
     
  11. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Concerns, nope. I wouldn't even consider it.