What was the philosophy/rules about guns in your house, when you were growing up?

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Winchester94, Nov 20, 2013.

  1. Winchester94

    Winchester94 New Member

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    I was taught to shoot by my dad and grandpa and they taught me that different types of guns were for specific uses only. I don't necessarily agree with all of the points, but I'm curious how other were taught.
    The way I was taught is, as follows:
    1. Centerfire rifles are for hunting ONLY, never to shoot for fun or plink with.
    2. Centerfire pistols are for self defense only, except for very occasional target shooting.
    3. .22 rifles and pistols are for plinking or hunting small game.
    4. Shotguns are for hunting or shooting skeet.
     
  2. nchunt101

    nchunt101 New Member

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    1)Guns kill things so don't point them at anything that is not ment to be shot.
    2) dont spray and pray--even when dove hunting I was reminded each time I pulled the trigger it was a 17 cents (or whatever a shotgun shell cost)
    3)Guns are not toys
    4)Clean them as soon as you are done.
    5)Dont be stupid and pay attention to what you are doing
     

  3. Winchester94

    Winchester94 New Member

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    I had these same things taught too me. Especially 3,4, & 5.
     
  4. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Line that peg up with this notch, pull the trigger. Have fun. Don't shoot anyone.
     
  5. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Sounds like the MS abridged version I learned. Only addition was "don't get them out of dad's closet unless he says you can" and "don't leave live ammo in your pockets for your mother to launder" and later on "don't let the police see you shooting squirrels in the yard".
     
  6. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Yeah, those rules came along later. And remember, I was raised in Mississippi myself.
     
  7. fupuk

    fupuk New Member

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    Basically the same here, my dad had the firearms downstairs in a gun cabinet with all the ammo in the same cabinet.
     
  8. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Guns were never talked about in my house. I grew up in a suburb near a large city. My Dad had a pistol and a rifle but I didn't know he had them until I was a teen. It wasn't a part of our suburban life and the topic never really came up.
     
  9. Steel_Talon

    Steel_Talon New Member

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    When I grew up Guns were always exposed (displayed) in our house we had large glass and wood cabinets. They were honorable tools and heirlooms. We lived during a time when burglaries were not committed in our little communities.
     
  10. Winchester94

    Winchester94 New Member

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    That's how my family and I view them.
     
  11. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    We didn't have enough for that, just a few each for Dad and me-NONE for my sisters thankfully (I never would have made it out of grade school).


    After thinking about it, I think perhaps my dislike of snubby revolvers may be partially related to my father's opinion of them as mostly useless and regrettable when used (his brother in law was a cop for years). He didn't complain when his mother gave me her .38 snubby, but correctly viewed it as a crap gun (Titan brand) that would hurt my knuckles.
     
  12. bige91603

    bige91603 New Member

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    My parents really played Switzerland when it came to guns. They werent really interested in them but they weren't opposed to them. I didn't get into firearms until high school when a good friend and his father took me out shooting and hunting. It really took off from there for me along with the decision to get into law enforcement as a degree in college
     
  13. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    my brother and i were exposed to guns at an early age.

    we were taught to respect them and to treat them with respect and care. like anything we were taught that when you lose respect for something is when it can hurt you or others.

    we were taught to care for and maintain firearms. just like anything that costs you hard earned money should be cared for and not abused and it will serve you well for many years.

    my father was not a hunter, but had no problems with my brother and i going hunting. but he did have some strict guidelines he expected us to abide. that we would only hunt and kill what we planned on eating. killing for nothing more than just to kill was not permitted. we were expected to stay within our abilities and the abilities of the gun we used. that we respect the game and to kill quickly and as cleanly as possible so that there was no undue suffering of the animal. that we respect the animal we were hunting.

    my father even though he didn't hunt or care to do it personally, he did help us out with hunting. he would help us build deer stands, plant cover crops in the fall, help us field dress our game and many other things.

    i learned the love of guns from my father and expanded upon what i was brought up with. i would never be the gun enthuiast i am now without the guidance i recieved from my father.
     
  14. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    What was the philosophy/rules about guns in your house, when you were growing up?

    The 243 is behind the door, don't miss that coyote.
     
  15. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    My step-father was an idiot. He took me out shooting once. He had a Llama 380 that looked just like a mini 1911. It was nickel plated with pearl grips. Beautiful little gun. He took me out to shoot it. He brought 1 mag of ammo. He put a pop can on top of a log. He fired all but the last shot. He never hit the can. He offered it to me. I fired the last shot. Can went flying. We got in the car and left. He never let me shoot again. He never taught me about safety. We did not wear hearing protection. He thought it was funny that our ears were ringing all day. I was probably 8 years old.

    When I was 16 my friends all got 22 rifles. I bought one from of them. It was a Marlin model 60. We all had bb rifles too. I taught myself to shoot. When I was 17 the army taught me better.

    I have not made the same mistakes with my son that my idiot step-father made with me. My son is a great shot. And he is one of the safest shooters I know. He is 15 and I am not afraid to turn my back on him at the range. It is sad that he will not be able to experience the freedoms I had as a 16 year old. He has a 1962 Jeep that we have been building. It is my avatar. But I am not going to let him take his friends out shooting without me.

    My step-father owned a night club in Delaware. He always laughed about the people he scared with his gun. He would wave it around in the bar. He had a bunch of friends that were cops. That is probably the only reason he never got arrested.
     
  16. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    This reminds me of an incident that happened at the bar. Ralph (step-dad) had just had new gravel put down in the parking lot at the bar. A guy was spinning his tires out in the new gravel. Ralph got all pissed off and shot all 4 tires out on the guys car. A police officer came by the house later. We lived in a home that was built above the bar. Instead of warning Ralph or arresting him for reckless endangerment, the officer was laughing about how they caught the "vandal" down at the gas station trying to air up his tires. This was in Dover Delaware. The chief of police was probably named "Bubba".
     
  17. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    No guns in the house and I didn't know anyone who had one. I learned how to shoot a rifle in ROTC in the 10th grade. Got the bug and I've never lost it. That was 51 years ago.
     
  18. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    I grew up in the country. Red dirt road country. Volunteer fire department and party line telephone country.

    I was given a .410 the day I was born (literally). Dad's 30-30 Marlin was on a deer foot rack on the wall of my room. His Fox 12 g and his Marlin 39A were next to the dresser in his room.

    We did not depend on game to eat- but a lot of our diet involved .22 rimfire. Mom and my sisters were competent with a rifle or pistol. By age 6 I was hunting, usually with one of my teenaged uncles. By age 11 I could take a rifle or my new pump shotgun and hunt on my own, on our own property. At that age I could buy ammo at the local country store. The storekeeper went to church with us, knew my folks, and was friends with all 4 grandparents.

    EVERYONE had a single shot shotgun or a rifle behind the door. Crime? Nope. Lock your doors? Nope. Know anyone in prison? Nope. Know anyone that has been shot? Yeah, Uncle Charlie. German sniper wounded him in Normandy. He got the sniper.

    Guns were a normal part of everyday life.
     
  19. t_humm

    t_humm New Member

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    1 Guns are meant to make things go away, don't point it at anything you aren't willing to lose (feet, people, ect)
    2 don't take it unless dad said you can

    Other than that not much was ever said, except it was the rule that my mom didn't want any "new" guns showing up.
    I nullified that when I turned 18 and my dad took the opera unity to expand his collection too haha
     
  20. Rocky7

    Rocky7 New Member

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    I got my first firearm at around 9 yrs. old. A .22 single shot. At that time, the rules were:

    Don't touch a gun in the house.
    Never point a gun at anything you do not want to kill.
    Use the safety but don't trust it.
    Shoot partridge in the head, it won't ruin any meat.

    His .270, shotgun and my .22 were in a corner in their bedroom. I knew where they were. I also knew better than to touch any of them without permission - ever.