What type of training can help you identify a real threat?

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by hq357, Jun 29, 2013.

  1. hq357

    hq357 New Member

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    Just now i thought sombody was trying to steal my motorcycle i live in a condo and i chain my motorcylce down in front of my house, i was watching tv and my mom bursts into my room and says son son! somebody is trying to steal your bike! someone is rattling the chains outside! Its 2:30 am and its not the first time someone has stolen something off my driveway so i grabbed my glock 19 ran outside and chambered a round. My gun was loaded and ready to go There was nobody out there and i went back inside i am really shooken up and it all happend so fast my adrenaline was pumping and i wasn't even thinking i don't ever want to shoot anybody unless they are a real threat and they are going to hurt me or my family. did i overreact by chambering a round? Or should i identify the threat and then chamber a round? Where can i go to get proper training? i don't think i would have shot even if there was somebody. but now im questioning myself because of how intense my adrenaline was pumping and how fast i responded i want to be assured i wouldn't shoot unless it was a real danger or threat what kind of drills should i do? Did i respond correctly? What would you have done?
     
  2. dcilten

    dcilten New Member

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    I would recommend a concealed carry class, even if you decide not to carry. Follow that up with a home defense class. Check out the NRA's refuse to be a victim program. They list NRA certified instructors in your area and the classes they offer. I keep my weapons locked and loaded at all times. Think about what could of happened if it was a ploy to get you outside by making noise, in the time it took you to rack your slide the bad guy could already of had the drop on you, and you wouldn't have been able to respond because you didn't have a round chambered. A gun is nothing but an overpriced paper weight or door stop if you don't have it loaded. That's what kills me about states that require your guns be stored unloaded with the ammo separated. What good is it going to do if you have to go through all kinds of steps to get your gun functional? I'm all for weapon safety and keeping guns out of reach of my kids, but that's why I keep them locked in a quick access safe during the day and in my nightstand at night. They also know never to touch a real gun if they see one.

    Anyway off topic a little bit, but yeah, check out the NRA programs to get some training that you feel would be beneficial for your situation.
     

  3. hq357

    hq357 New Member

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    I live in arizona and im 19 i i need to be 21 to to obtain a concealed carried license, my stedpdad works night shifts he is the one that has the concealed carry license but he works night shifts and its just me my mom the dogs and our glock during the night i chambered a round as soon as i grabbed it my mom got scared and yelled dont shoot It! i said ok i know what im doing and went outside to look around. the glock was loaded and i do feel confident controlling the gun even though there really isnt a safety except the trigger and i know what im doing with it. im just not confident and not sure how to react if there actually is a threat or somone there trying to steal my motorcycle i dont want to shoot and kill somone if they are just going to steal something. I only want to kill if my family me or my little dogs are going to be hurt. i think im going to buy my own 12 guage and load the first round with a bean bag and the rest with buckshot for home defense. Is this a good option?
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2013
  4. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You might begin by reading your state laws. And yes, you do need some training.

    Why didn't you just call the police? Were you willing to shoot a person over the theft of a motorcycle?

    Bean bags? Hell no that is not a good option. If you shoot a person with a bean bag from a shotgun, you have still have "shot" them. I don't think that the law differentiates over the projectile you use. If you shoot someone with a bean bag and they are armed, then you are probably going to die young. If you can't legally shoot them with 00B then you can't shoot them with bean bags.

    In most places you can only use a firearm if your or someone else's life is in immediate and deadly jeopardy. Stealing property does not meet that criteria.
     
  5. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are some things I guess you could point out to help with this but I teach, 'follow your instincts'. If it doesn't feel right it probably isn't!!!
    Either avoid it or be prepared to deal with it.:)
     
  6. arizona98tj

    arizona98tj New Member

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    Shooting someone for stealing a vehicle from your driveway when you are in the house is a great way to end up in a huge world of trouble.

    You do need training....you need to understand when you can and cannot use deadly force.
     
  7. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That is not the point here. EVERYONE who accepts the responsibility of being armed must know the 'law'. Identifying a 'threat' has nothing to do with the law, only your situational awareness.
     
  8. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think we have a 'double thread' here!!!:confused:
    Check the 'training' forum.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2013
  9. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    hq357

    Chain is right on the money with his advice! But there are some things that precede your action.
    1. Call the police since even though they were not there when you went out. You can bet they were probably still in the area seeing what they could steal.
    But to start, if the area of your bike is in view from a window or around a building it would be best to observe the area for a while first. This might keep you even armed, from walking into a bad situation or worse. They could be armed and ready or have a lookout or backup individual. An example from experience, a guy was having his car broken into in a apartment complex in the city. He went charging out of his apartment to the car and was shot and killed immediately right there on the sidewalk. Never had a chance to defend himself. So gets back to the point. if I were going to go out and approach anyone stealing my bike, you bet I would have one cambered and the gun out of the holster or wherever it is carried.
    As Chain stated in most states you can not use deadly force in theft cases unless you are threatened with serious bodily injury or death yourself. Obvioulsy if they pulled a weapon and aimed it at you or shot at you that would constitute the use of deadly force but only then.
    But I believe it is a great idea that anyone who carries or has a weapon for self defense should get some profesional training, know how to operate the weapon, become proficient and know the Law. The NRA has some good classes as do some shooting facilities. But get some references on outside trainers. There are a lot of so called instructors out there only sucking up bucks with little training experience. "Wanabees!
    Good luck and I am glad this particular incident came out in your favor!:)


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  10. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think we have beat this 'less lethal' thing to death. If you are not backed up by a person armed with lethal force, less lethal is NOT an option!!!;)
     
  11. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think a lot of its common sense most don't need training for that. For some no amount of training will help. I am not referring to you but someone leaving the house and exposing themselves to danger is not sensible.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2013