What to check when purchasing a used semi-automatic

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by SGT-MILLER, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. SGT-MILLER

    SGT-MILLER New Member

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    Ok. We've all been there. You look into a display window and see a nice semi auto that you really like. You notice that it's used. You would purchase thise weapon because of the cheap cost, but you aren't sure if it's a "lemon" or a good running gun.

    Here's some quick tips to help you out. The weapon used in these pics is my personal Smith and Wesson SW40VE Sigma. This pistol is used, and has tons of medium to high power .40 rounds through it so far.

    1. Check the area where the exposed portion of the barrel meets the slide. If it's used, you should see some wear, but there shouldn't be excessive pitting, cracks, or gouges.
    [​IMG]

    2. Check your sights. If the sights are broken in any way, then it would be wise to put the pistol down and look for something else. The sights should be clean, tight, and should align easily when obtaining a correct sight picture.
    [​IMG]

    3. Check the condition of the feed ramp. There should be no cracks, pitted areas, or missing sections.
    [​IMG]

    4. Check the breech face of the weapon. There should be no cracks or pitted areas. The extractor/ejector should not have cracks, and should function correctly. The firing pin hole shouldn't look like it's overly large.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. SGT-MILLER

    SGT-MILLER New Member

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    5. Check the slide assembly (i.e. upper receiver). Some wear of the parts is ok, but there shouldn't see any obvious signs of abuse (i.e. cracking, missing parts, pitting, tool marks, etc....)
    [​IMG]

    6. Check the frame assembly (i.e. lower receiver) for any signs of abuse / misuse. Look to see if all springs are where they should be, and look to see if there are any signs of alterations (i.e. tool marks)
    [​IMG]

    ABOVE ALL!!! You should always keep a cautious eye open on any pistol that is extremely dirty. A dirty gun will cover up damage such as cracks and whatnot, plus a dirty gun is a sign that the previous owner did not care for it much.
     

  3. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Good post there sarge.

    A tip on photographs. If you camera has a MACRO setting try using it for the close up shots and the will not be blury. Most of the time MACRO mode is represented by a flower on your mode dial.

    Like this.

    Regular:

    Aprox 9 to 10" from item.

    IMG_0362.JPG



    This is a Macro shot that is aprox 2" from item. Notice that the picture is clear and has lots of details.

    IMG_0368.jpg