What parts are critical to accuracy?

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by TheDaggle, Jun 14, 2010.

  1. TheDaggle

    TheDaggle Member

    977
    0
    16
    So I'm finally selling a bunch of high end stereo equipment that I'm never going to use, and I'm going to put the money towards an AR build. I'm finding great deals everywhere, but I'm wondering what parts I need to splurge on to get max accuracy.
    Del-ton has some awesome deals. I'm looking at a 20" kit with chrome lined barrel, RRA 2 stage trigger LPK, m4 feed ramps, and pretty much everything else bargain parts.
    Is there anything here I'm spending extra on that I don't need to? Anything I'm not spending extra on that I should?

    Del-ton 20" rifle kit
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2010
  2. bkt

    bkt New Member

    6,964
    0
    0
    Probably optics. Most garden-variety AR's with a 14" chrome-lined barrel is very accurate out of the box out to a couple hundred yards.

    A 20" or longer chrome-moly match barrel will get you higher accuracy at longer ranges, which I assume is what you're after. The nicer trigger will only help. Not sure the feed ramps make much of a difference, honestly.

    Match grade ammo will help. On that note, your barrel is 1:9 which might not be best for heavier match-grade rounds. 1:9 is good for 55gr (give or take). 1:12 is generally regarded better for heavier rounds.

    Most rifles are capable of shooting better than the guy holding it, so expect to spend a lot of time at the range improving your shot.
     

  3. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

    3,659
    0
    0
    Sorry bkt, but you've got it backwards.
    The 1:12 twist is slower and better suited for light 40gr up to 55gr bullets.
    Alot of commercial varmint rifles carry this twist.
    1:9 works great for 55gr and is typically thought to easily stabilize bullets up to 69gr. Some 9 twist rifles will work with up to 75grains, but don't count on it, you'd need to try for yourself as barrels are different and your conditions will be different.
    If you want to shoot the long, heavy 69-80gr match bullets you would be better off looking for a faster 1-7 twist. This twist is what the military currently uses and will work well for 55gr bullets as well. It may be too fast for light 40gr
     
  4. bkt

    bkt New Member

    6,964
    0
    0
    Brain fart. Sorry. You're right. Heavier loads can handle the faster spin. Lighter loads require less spin. Duh.
     
  5. moshpit

    moshpit New Member

    165
    0
    0
    75gr is okay on most 1/9's out to about 200-300 yards. It's really out past that where you start needing to be sure and test. Anything below 300 yards isn't a good test of how well 75gr runs in your particular 1/9 barreled setup. I can't find a 75 grain round that acts any different then a 65-70 below that distance. Out past 300, I can see Hornady TAP loses some stability while the Hornady non-TAP 75's seems to stay pretty dead on. Sorry for the less the pro assessment, but that's just my limited experience with 1/9 and 75gr ammo. Need to test some more brands and flavors for a more thorough test.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2010
  6. TheDaggle

    TheDaggle Member

    977
    0
    16
    So chrome-moly barrels are more accurate, but chrome lined are more durable? Are m4 feed ramps a reliability plus?

    Most importantly, del-ton is very affordable, but how is their quality? A complete kit minus stripped lower for under $600 is very attractive, but what am I sacrificing for that kind of a deal?
     
  7. TheDaggle

    TheDaggle Member

    977
    0
    16
    Duly noted. I was thinking I would get acquainted with the gun on irons, as I intend to put some significant money into a good scope, and that may have to wait until tax return season.

    Say it ain't so. :cool:
     
  8. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

    7,551
    1
    0
    Yes to both parts of your first question...

    The second, M4 feed ramps are more reliable in M4/M4A1 carbines, especially in burst or auto mode with longer/heavier ammo, but not needed in the M16/20" rifles. M4 feed ramps probably don't make much difference in semiauto carbines or rifles but most of us want them anyway.

    Del-Ton makes decent kits but I'd rather pick and choose components myself that are tougher. For about $750 or a little more you can do better if you research components and build your own.
     
  9. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

    2,523
    0
    0
    An extra question about those price-attractive Del-Ton kits is this:

    I don't plan on buying optics any time soon, so should I just go ahead and get an upper with integral iron sights (the handle and the front riser)? OR should I get a flat-top upper and get MBUS back-up sights?

    This thread is about best accuracy for cheapest cost, so I'm just looking from that perspective.
     
  10. Shihan

    Shihan Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    8,590
    2
    38
    I have a Del-Ton AR and the quality is very good. I paid $699 for the complete Rifle.
    I have not had a problem with it at all. A big plus for me is that they are only 42 miles down the road from me.

    I think you would be happy with the Del-Ton.
     
  11. TheDaggle

    TheDaggle Member

    977
    0
    16
    Right on. I bought my stripped lower this afternoon, and I've pretty much decided to go ahead with the del-ton for several reasons.
    1. Price.
    2. Price.
    3. Mix and match components from same company means the parts I want, in one package, with one shipping fee.
    4. I've heard almost entirely positive things about del-ton from several forums (though obviously this one is the best...;)).
    5. The extra money can go to the ammo I'll need to burn getting to know my rifle.
    6. Did I mention the price?

    Thanks, gentlemen.
     
  12. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

    23,972
    1
    0
    Daggle - You should be fine.

    Look, I have said this a hundred times, the lower is probably one of the least important parts of an accurate/functional AR. The Upper is right there close on that list too. :rolleyes:

    As long as you buy one from a reputable maker ( and Del Ton has been good to a lot of folks we know through the shop ) you will be fine.

    Just don't go buying a pot metal one out of China or some place like Uncle Fred's Tire Shop and AR-One-Stop-Buying-Center, you will be fine. :cool:

    JD