What is the Course of Fire or Drill that you practice the most?

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by jetgirl, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. jetgirl

    jetgirl New Member

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    What is the Course of Fire or Drill that you practice most? And why?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 2, 2010
  2. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I vary my practice sessions. I have some old courses of fire we used when I was active in IPSC, and Bullseyes sessions. I keep track of my scores and times. IMO, when you practice the same thing, you become proficient in that practice. When you vary (and keep the results), you become more proficient overall.
    The problem that arises is that some will "cheat" and not record a bad session. I try to analyze what went wrong, and try to fix it for the next time (and make notes for future reference).
     

  3. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

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    Normally when I practice I always try to have fun, although, I'll be shooting a Bullseye league come September so I'm been practicing with the Mark II, strong hand, at 25 yards. This practice is very humbling and I'm not having much fun. I rather be shooting centers out of targets at 7 yards with the 45.
     
  4. jetgirl

    jetgirl New Member

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    I don't think I do enough one-handed and weak-hand shooting.
     
  5. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    If you have a firearm that can be "dry-fired", you may not need a range for one-handed or non-dominant hand practice.
    You can do that in an interior space. Triple check that the firearm is unloaded.
    Get in position and take aim at different things in the room. Practice the basics.

    Triple check that the firearm is unloaded, again.

    Watch your front sight and pull the trigger.
    As you practice, you will find that muscle memory will develop.
     
  6. jetgirl

    jetgirl New Member

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    You're right. I tend to forget about that.
     
  7. safedman

    safedman New Member

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    Snap Caps also make travel to the range un-neccessary.
    My practice consists of Body armor drills at 7 and 10 yards, and face to target push off, start walking backwards, draw & shoot as weapon is coming up to sight plane, raise to sight plane walking backward away from target amd empty mag, reload.
    Fun to do. :)

    OK you can laugh..

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZivF06bBRY[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2010
  8. gorknoids

    gorknoids New Member

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    It varies from trip to trip. Sometimes it's all dedicated to what's going on with my grip. Other times it's closing the right partition and working on weak-handed shots from cover (Don't belong to an outdoor range/club, so it's all I have available). 200 rounds in a Weaver stance at 12' just doesn't trip my trigger. One that I do when the range is fairly empty is to start out standing, shoot, crouch, shoot, kneel shoot, slide right, etc until I'm standing on the other side of my lane. Do it strong-handed, two-handed, and weak-handed.
     
  9. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    I mix it up each time but my go-to training is the Mozambique Drill.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    When I can get to a range that allows it, I practice draw-doubletap-two or three targets. I try to set it up that I will have a hot reload every two or three strings of fire. I get practice at several different parts of combat shooting in very little time.

    When I was teaching myself to master the DA/SA trigger transition on my 4506. This kind of drill once a week, 50 rounds/week and I was pretty darn good at it in a month. 4 boxes of ammo is all it took.
     
  11. sarge_257

    sarge_257 New Member

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    Practice sessions

    After shooting on the US Army Pistol Team for 18 yrs. I am a little tired of competition shooting. Now I just go to the range to have fun, to check my reloads for accuracy, to range check my customers guns I have repaired and to sight in my hunting guns. As far as competition goes the only one I compete against is my son. He and I always have friendly man on man matches. Dang he is getting good. He can outshoot me with a rifle but I got him on pistol and most of the time on shotgun.
    Sarge