What does the grain of the bullet mean?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by molonlabexx, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    Hello, I have a noobish question that I know some haters will love to hag me on. But first, I know a lot about guns themselves, but I am teaching myself now about the ammo they take. I know the calibers but what is the grain? I know it is a measurement. Does the grain go for the whole round or just the bullet and not the powder/ case. So if I have a 40 grain .22 LR round, what does all that mean (obviously it' .22 long rifle but how much powder is charged in it and what is the weight of the bullet if measured in grains?) Is it also true that the more grains a bullet has, the less recoil? Thanks guys and I appreciate all the input on past posts!
     
  2. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

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    It is the weight of just the bullet. More grains=more recoil.
     

  3. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    Grain is simply a unit of weight. 7000 grains equal 1 pound.

    On ammo boxes it refers to the weight of the bullet only.

    I suppose that in the same gun, with the same powder at
    the same velocity the heavier bullet would recoil more---
    that's simple physics. But usually when ammo is loaded
    with heavier bullets, they are loaded to a lower velocity.

    So no---you can't make a blanket statement that "heavier
    bullets kick more".
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  4. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    Thanks for the replies folks! Wanted to make sure I knew info on the grain for my next ammo purchase.
     
  5. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Generally speaking, lighter bullets (lower grain weight) are loaded to higher velocity. Light, fast hollow points tend to expand more rapidly and penetrate less. A super light bullet at very high velocity may not penetrate deeply enough to damage vital organs. This can lead to wounded game (when hunting) and pissed off bad guys in a self defense situation.
     
  6. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    So a 40 grain .22LR may not be the best choice for home defense?
     
  7. Kraj

    Kraj New Member

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    At .22 isn't the best choice for any defence. But its better than no gun
     
  8. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    A 22lr isn't the best choice for home defense unless it is all you have available, a shotgun or pretty much any centerfire rifle or handgun would be better.
     
  9. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    Yeah. Trying to get those 25 round mags that way I have more shots. I have a 12 gauge in the closet as a backup but its a single shot. 10/22 is semi. I sometimes switch it up to where I only use my shotgun.
     
  10. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    If all you have for self defense is a .22 rifle, you would be better served with a high velocity hollow point IF it cycles in your rifle WITHOUT FAIL.
     
  11. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    it has been my experience that 25 and 30 rd mags are more trouble than theyre worth, I have yet to get one that works reliably in any of my .22s, I would be more comfortable with the 10 rd factory mag in my Ruger. I would use the single shot shotgun over the 22 as a primary home defense gun, if there's more than 1 bad guy, you shoot the first one and his buddies will probably be running out the door with a load of $hit in their pants.
     
  12. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    Apparently the CCI loads that aren't bulk have little to no misfires that are the direct result of CCI themselves. I think this is the case because they are not made in bulk so a bit more detail is put into them. I try to stay away from Remington and Winchester bulk packs because you will get a few undercharged rounds in the mix. Currently I am using Blazer (which is owned by CCI) 40 grain lead nose. Haven't had a chance to test them out but again, have heard they are the better of any bulk packs because they are owned by CCI.

    What about a CCI mini-mag copper HP? I think those are in the 30-40 grain class. Based on youtube videos, they seem to penetrate calibrated gel very deep and expand well.
     
  13. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    blue, have you tried the "Steel Lips" mag?? It's the only one that works very well in my 10-22.
     
  14. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    CCI Mini-mags= good.
     
  15. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    No I haven't used that one. I have read bad reviews on most every kind I found online even the one Ruger has their name on. Could be most are ok and a few aren't and those people post online, who knows
     
  16. tngunnut14

    tngunnut14 New Member

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    The Ruger BX25 mags are good. Never had any issues with the ones I have. And if you had to shoot a threat with a 22, it is going to take several rounds to reliably stop the threat, so the increased magazine capacity isn't much of an advantage.
     
  17. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    Yeah never use the hot lips in anything. They suck. Steel is the best to use. More durable. Also only use ruger mags. Hard to find a good off brand.
     
  18. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    Will be sure to check it out. Thank you.