What do you do with your single stage presses, post upgrade?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Shopfox, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I missed this thread the first go round! My thoughts? For the price of the press, you made out like a bandit, and it's worth what you paid, even if used occasionally. That is at least a $150 press brand new, just by itself.

    At some point in the near future, I will be adding a turret type press to my reloading bench, mainly for larger volumes of pistol cartridges, and 223 fro the AR's. But the other three single-stage presses will still be utilized for other loads and for other purposes. One of my smaller "C" presses, I plan making it for simply priming operations.
     
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  2. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    I've thought about getting a turret press. But I believe I can get a very good quality single stage press for the price of a mediocre turret press. With the quick change die bushings (such as Hornady Lock N' Load) changing from one die to another isn't that big of a deal.
    I think I would rather have a good quality single stage press even if there was a bit more work or steps to use it. Besides, my reloading will be for my own fun and hobby for my leisure. If production was the goal I would get a progressive press. I still have my old Lee press for de-capping. Still not sure if, when and what I will get should I decide to take the plunge.
     

  3. Shopfox

    Shopfox Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I honestly don't think the press choice is going to effect your end accuracy. For myself, I'm never going to wear out my Lee Turret. I just don't do that kind of volume shooting either.

    Where the Turret really makes sense for me is "one-piece flow". There's an expression, "nothing good happens to inventory." After priming, I produce one complete round at a time. Weigh powder, pour it, place bullet, seat it, crimp it, and repeat.

    Practically speaking, I rotate my die holder back and forth betweeen the seating die and crimping die for rifle cartridges.

    The advantage here is you don't have an inventory of 50-100 brass filled with powder waiting for bullets (or waiting to be knocked over/spilled), or an inventory of seated bullets waiting for crimping.

    It makes it easier to walk away - just finish the 1 round you're working on, and shut her down for the night.
     
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  4. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I currently use a Redding BOSS single stage press, along with Redding dies, because I like the way those dies are made. I don't load a lot of rifle rounds to warrant a progressive press that costs a ton of money, but I can see, and understand, where those who shoot a lot of handgun rounds, as in speed steel events, feel they like to load a bunch of rounds at one sitting would prefer something like a Dillon system to get it done within short order.
     
  5. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As far as an electronic scale, I use the version from Hornady. It serves me well enough.
     
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  6. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    If my progressive is already set up for the caliber I want to work with it is fine. But if I need to load something different I do not change it for less than 200 rounds. If I want to load 100 rounds of 44 mag I use the Rock Chucker, or maybe even the Lee Hand Press. That is fun to sit in front of the tv and process brass with the hand press.
     
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  7. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, that makes a hell of a lot of sense. There are many of the calibers that I shoot that don't need to be "groupies" that print within 2-inches at 50 feet. If those rounds print within 2 X 2 center of mass, at 50 feet, during a scaryass encounter, I will be able to get back home to lunch for tomato soup and a grilled cheese sandwhich, and that will make my day!
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019
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  8. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    I honestly didn't look at it that way and it makes perfect sense. Good point.
     
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  9. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Except for re-sizing magnum cases using a Rockchucker press, my reloading is accomplished using RCBS Jr. presses.
     
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