What do you do for defense training?

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by DarinCraft, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

    1,159
    0
    0
    There are a lot of us out here who have a wealth of training knowledge that can easily be passed on to the uneducated members here through this forum. So this is my question.

    What do you do to train yourself to ensure that you are:
    1) prepared for a threat if one comes up?
    2) prepared for the type of threat you might encounter?
    3) responsible and aware of your surroundings when dealing with that threat?

    I am sure those with less than city/county/state/federal training might be forced to go to the range and shoot at targets because they don't know what to do to sharpen their skills.

    Me,
    I practice failure drills from a holstered position out to 10 yards and double taps to 20.

    I load a mag interchanging between spent casings and live rounds and throw it in a box the night before. Then the next day when I have forgotten the order of dead rounds, I throw my other three mags loaded in the box and fish around for my mags. This way I have no idea when I will get a failure and will be forced to react and not predict.

    I practice moving from side to side while engaging the target. I also make a conscious effort to locate cover/concealment.

    Also practice a 5 point draw from the holster. You would not believe how much more accurate you are when you stop bowling.

    Mag changes and holster drawing with an unloaded FA is very important. Practice drawing with it concealed, like you would have to in reality. Leave your shirt over the top and practice using your thumb to move your shirt out of the way while you draw.

    Thanks guys
     
  2. jeepcreep927

    jeepcreep927 New Member

    1,105
    0
    0
    Run, jump, pull, push, swim, push ups, sit ups, anything that makes your pulse race your heart pound and your hands shake. Stress simulation will give you a good idea of how things will go down when things go south for real.

    Darin, I thought you were on the job, right? Do you do this kinda stuff for quals? I am the firearms instructor in my dept. and really trying to get a stress course as part of qualification but no luck so far. Not in the budget apparently. Best I can do so far is have a few guys over to my house, on our dime, about three times a month to work on real shooting versus putting holes in paper. If you have any documentation you could send me that stresses training in regard to liability (vicarious liability) that would be great. I don't think anything else motivates my admin aside from the word " liability" and "money". Thanks and stay safe.
     

  3. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

    1,159
    0
    0
    We had a high stress course of fire, but it was rare due to the time constraints on qual shooting. However on training rotation or active shooter/SWAT we did a specialized course of fire that involved shooting numbered targets, running, shooting around cover, crabcrawls and the like. Our department was very free with new things as long as there was time and our FA cadre pretty did whatever came to mind. I can try to locate any documentation they used.

    My point with this post was to open up our training to the people with out specialized training. Simple things that they can take to the range to hone their skills instead of standing in front of a piece of paper and shooting.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2011
  4. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

    8,411
    3
    0
    I shoot, as much as the weather and my wallet will allow. I practice close quarters draw and fire drills in the garage with an empty gun or snap caps. I am just starting to get into shape and my hands shake just thinking about exercise.

    My wife and I have gone through break in scenarios and I know that if it ever does happen, there will be problems.
     
  5. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

    1,159
    0
    0
    That is great advice!
     
  6. TheDaggle

    TheDaggle Member

    977
    0
    16
    My dad retired in sept. from what Jeepcreep is doing now, so I do whatever he throws at me when we're out :)

    Failure drills; he'll load my mags with his back turned and I don't know how many rounds I have, if there are any duds, or where the duds are.
    Sometimes he'll load my handgun and hand it to me, and I don't know if he put 1 round in or left it empty. This helped get rid of my flinch, and improved my DA pull.
    Moving drills; generally 10 rounds in 10 seconds or 5 rounds in 5 seconds while moving quickly laterally or backward. Sometimes he'll lay out obstructions on the ground and have me slalom while attempting to keep my shots in center mass, requiring 10rds before I reach the last obstacle. This forces you to be aware of your terrain and keep your mind flexible.
    Instinctive shooting; sometimes there isn't time for sights. I suspect that in most self-defense shootings outside the home, you're not going to know you need your gun until time has run out. I think it helps to be able to get your weapon out and get rounds into a target at close range without trying to acquire sight picture. Maybe you won't get 10 rounds dead center of the chest, but getting 7 rounds to your target's torso before you sustain an injury is a lot better than getting a knife in your gut while you search for your bead.
    I also like to practice standing with my back against a target, turning, creating distance, drawing, firing.

    There's 5 cents out of a penny :D
     
  7. pandamonium

    pandamonium New Member

    1,601
    0
    0
    Darrin, could you please explain 5 point draw as I am unfamiliar with the term. Thanks and please keep up these great posts, very informative!!
     
  8. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

    29,528
    521
    113
    Also, I don't know what 'double taps' means. Can someone explain?
     
  9. Jay

    Jay New Member

    736
    0
    0
    Winds of Change......Two closely-spaced, yet aimed shots, fired at the same target....

    This gent shoots three "double taps".... and I too, would like to know more about the 5 point draw.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nF3GyEipPaw]YouTube - 1911 double taps[/ame]
     
  10. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

    29,528
    521
    113
    Thank you.
     
  11. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

    12,369
    57
    48
    I count the steps I take in each room of the house (and sometimes close my eyes as I move about). Three steps forward, turn left, 2 steps, turn right, 5 steps (yep I missed that dern dog that sleeps all the time, or the coffee table).

    Know what is in the wall and what is on the other side. Wall board alone is a great conceal item, but a terrible barrier.
     
  12. pandamonium

    pandamonium New Member

    1,601
    0
    0

    That works great until the wife re-arranges the furniture!!
     
  13. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

    1,159
    0
    0
    Another thing that people forget. You have a HUGE advantage over the bad guy. He is on your turf. Great reminder Dan thanks.
     
  14. Car54

    Car54 New Member

    2,103
    0
    0
    Another thing you can do that doesn't involve shooting is to constantly be aware of your surroundings and those who surround you. Watch people and their actions. The hands and eyes are the most important areas to watch. Most often furtive eye movement and hand gestures will coincide with each other just prior to or at the onset of any action.

    Be alert and look for areas of safety that offer cover or concealment for you and your family if an incident breaks out. Always think of getting to safety before engaging the threat unless your life depends on immediate action. It might be as simple as moving into a store from the court area in a mall. If possible continue to watch the incident as you move to safety while notifying the authorities, but don't jeopardize anyones safety in order to give a blow by blow account.

    Another thing, police departments have stressed a danger zone called the "reactionary gap". This is an area within 21 feet of you where a person can get to you within 1.5 seconds and do you harm. If trouble presents itself to you always make sure you try to keep at least that distance. A person armed with a knife who is not very proficient with it can still get to you and do you harm before you react if within the 21 foot gap.
     
  15. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

    7,143
    1
    0
    I've never had any formal training but I will add one factoid to this thread - know your gun and shoot it a lot. I've met bunches of folks that buy a gun & 1 box of ammo for protection - and put it in a dresser feeling very content. If you haven't fired at least 1000 rounds out of your defensive gun - you need to shoot it more...
     
  16. Shihan

    Shihan Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    8,590
    2
    38
    I like to practice my defensive bayonet fighting. I pay attention to parrying with the blade and blocking with the stock of the rifle. After the block I like to follow through with a slash.:D
     
  17. Jo da Plumbr

    Jo da Plumbr New Member

    4,492
    0
    0
    Due to the fact that I do not live in a free country my daily carry has to be a knife. And a folding knife at that. So I do a lot of practicing with pulling and deploying the blade in one motion. Then work on changing grips and stances.
    God I hope I never have to utilize any of that training.
     
  18. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

    1,159
    0
    0
    Great info Guys and Shihan...you still scare me:D

    NGIB, people always need to be reminded that the gun doesn't matter one bit if you can't hit anything with it or have no muscle memory. Great info thanks.

    Jo, never under estimate the power of a knife in the right hands. Your practice is invaluable. Great advice

    Car54 I am going to quote your reply and put it in my thread about things you might not consider thread. Good info for that thread.
    http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f55/some-things-you-might-not-have-thought-about-37910/
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2011
  19. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

    1,159
    0
    0
    I was asked to explain a couple of things in my OP.

    The failure drill is a term coined by LE that means you fired two shoots to center mass, however the threat failed to stop therefore you put one last round in the head (or the "A" box)

    Similarly, a double tap is anytime two rounds are fired in quick succession accurately. Usually they are at center mass, however sometimes can be in the "A" box. In my training scenarios the double tap is done at distances over 10 meters when a head shot is more difficult.

    Lastly, the five point draw. This is a method of drawing a firearm from the holster with a little extra movement as possible. Practicing this method will encourage muscle memory and the ability to fire much sooner than "bowling."

    1. Place your strong hand on your weapon ensuring a high purchase on the grip, while placing your weak hand against your belly just above your belt buckle.
    2. Clear all retentions and draw the weapon out of the holster straight up.
    3. Rotate the weapon 90* so that the muzzle is now facing the thread. The mag well on your weapon should be just above the opening of your holster.
    From this position you can now fire your weapon if need be.
    4. While bringing the weapon forward, bring your weak hand over and grasp the weapon.
    5. As soon as both hands are on the weapon DRIVE the weapon straight forward locking the elbow on your strong hand and keeping the elbow on your weak hand pointing down.

    This is a pretty good article with pics
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2011
  20. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

    1,159
    0
    0
    Proper grip and sight picture are what ensures accuracy and it allows you or the trainer to tell you what you are doing wrong based on where your round goes on the paper.

    First, the second knuckle on your fingers (the last knuckle a ring goes over when putting it on) should line up on top of each other and the thumb on your weak hand should follow in front of your strong hand thumb. Your trigger finger when on the trigger should have the last third of the tip of your finger on the trigger not the joint.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    When obtaining a sight picture focus on the target, then bring the gun into your line of vision. Obtain your sight picture (line up the sites), then focus on the front sight. The rear site should be hazzy, the target fuzzy and the front site clear as a bell. When ready to fire, squeeze (some say press) the trigger until the weapon fires. It should surprise you. This is why you always hear "Front site, press."
    [​IMG]
    Some other tips I've learned are to tighten the muscles in your back to pull your shoulders together. This and pushing your strong hand forward while pulling back on your weak hand will stabilize your weapon.

    Some things that might be happening if you are RIGHT HANDED.

    If you are missing to the left, you might be pulling too hard on your left hand. Lighten the pressure and make sure your left elbow is pointing down and not out.

    A miss to the right can mean you are not squeezing the trigger or you knuckle joint in what is pulling the trigger. Rearrange so the last third of the tip of your finger is what is on the trigger and squeeze, don't jerk it.

    A miss high could be a loose grip with your right hand.

    A miss low is almost always anticipation. Do the mag trick I talked about in the OP.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2011