What do Y'all think?

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by 1984cj, Sep 18, 2007.

  1. 1984cj

    1984cj New Member

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    A buddy of mine wants to go hog hunting. Unfortunately the hog season for the Wildlife management area is closed.
    However, You can hunt hog anytime you are hunting small game.
    BUT you can only carry the firearm that is appropriate for said small game.
    .22 rimfire.

    I have a couple of .22 repeaters that will handle .22LR and a Single Six that will handle .22 Mag.

    What would you do? Go look for hogs and squirrel with a .22 or wait until next season?
     
  2. BLS33

    BLS33 New Member Supporter

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    I'm not a hunter but would it be considered humane to kill a hog with a .22?
     

  3. Luvs2hunt

    Luvs2hunt New Member

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    There is no doubt that a .22 can kill just about anything if the bullet enters the brain. The tough part is getting through it to do it. Most everyone wants the hogs to be controlled or totally eliminated but in my opinion that will never happen. They breed so fast & and can have up to eight piglets in each litter. They have several litters each year so just do the math & you can see what a bad problem they can become in just a few years.
     
  4. Duck

    Duck New Member

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    It can be done, but you are putting yourself in a good position to have to track a wounded hog through the woods armed with a .22. When we kill hogs for slaughter (wild ones that have been fed out or tame ones) we do it with a .22, but it's in almost perfect conditions at about 10 feet. I've seen hogs act like they haven't even been hit when shot in the head with a .22. If you put it between their eyes, I'll almost guarantee you it will not kill them. They might fall over and squeal, but there is a pretty good chance they will get up. Draw an imaginary line from the pig's left ear to its right eye and from its right ear to its left eye, put the bullet where those lines cross and it will drop them dead as a doornail every time.

    You might want to make sure that you can't hunt hogs with a black powder rifle during small game season on public lands. I know you can in Georgia. As a matter of fact, I'm planning on doing some hog hunting this weekend on public land with my Knight rifle.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2007
  5. 1984cj

    1984cj New Member

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    Pigs, .22 to the brain pan and they drop. but you can get real close to a pig.
    My concern is, of course, hitting a moving feral hog in a vital place with a .22.
    I would prefer to use a 45-70, .44 Mag, .357 Mag or something more serious. The LAST thing I want to do is track a wounded, pissed off hog through a swamp with a .22! I am interested in others comments on this though.
     
  6. Duck

    Duck New Member

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    That's what I was getting at. I've seen 300+lb feral boars go down with a .22 shot to the dome, but it was in a pen and it was stationary. We catch them. If we need one for the freezer but catch a big one, we just feed it out for a little while to mellow out the taste. Personally, I wouldn't hunt hogs with a .22. Dogs and a knife are another story.
     
  7. MudHog

    MudHog New Member

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    I'm not saying I've done this a million times, but I can say I have done it once. I wouldn't trust doing it again though. I shot a pig with my .22LR semi-auto. on the run about 20-25 yards from me. The pig was about 125 lbs and it took me (3) shots. I caught it in the scope running (right to left across me) and made my shots, on the 3rd shot I kept following through and didn't see a pig in the crosshairs. About that same time I heard my buddies yelling "IT CUT A FRONT FLIP". According to them, on my 3rd shot the pig cut a complete front flip and fell to the ground. When we went to clean it, I found (2) bullets in the shoulder plate and (1) bullet in the shoulder plate, but inside the pig. Got to the heart and found a through and through hole in the heart. My 3rd bullet went right behind the near side shoulder plate and hit the heart and stuck in the far side shoulder plate. I would say that shot was a once in a lifetime shot.

    Now normal caliber for me to go hog hunting is my .308 7600. I got hunting once a year in Texas and this is what I bring every year.

    I guess that's a joy of LA, we can hunt pigs year round with whatever we want.

    To add to the close range head shots, I had a friend attempt to shoot a pig in a 2 horse trailer to kill and clean. He shot it dead in the head about 2-3' away with a .22LR pistol. He shot and the pig dropped. Handed the pistol to someone out the trailer to drag the hog out and this thing comes alive. Must of just stunned the pig because he surely wasn't dead. I've also seen a 200 yard shot on a pig with a .270 and the pig drop in his tracks. 5 minutes later while we talking to guys in the VHF saying pig down, the pig gets up and runs into the woods. Go check for blood and nothing found.

    Surest way to know they dead (some may not think the safest) is to hunt them with dogs and a knife.
     
  8. 300wsman

    300wsman New Member

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    use a shotgun, carry some slugs.
     
  9. 300wsman

    300wsman New Member

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    use a shotgun, carry some slugs.
     
  10. keitho

    keitho New Member

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    Post a reply

    I am not an expert but a couple of years ago I decided to get a wild hog with a 17 cal.Mission accomplished --got him about 30 feet shot him 3 times in the head --side shot--then he had enuff and charged me --ran past me and took a nose dive off a cliff.When he ran past me he was about 4 feet from me and I gave him another taste of 17 in the side.We were using dogs After this I decided that shooting hogs was not exciting enuff so we went to stabbing with the good ole K-bar.Now that is the way to go hog hunting (gathering)--That year we got about 30 hogs and ate some and gave most to the land owner.I really like wild hog meat.In the Ozarks they eat mostly wild nuts and such.No wild taste.At the time my wife and I operated a B & B and served "wild hog sausage"--The guest thot it was excellent.By the way I am 70 + years and have got to old to chase dogs I don't know somehow the Ozarks mtns seem to have gotten steeper:D
    Tame hogs can and usually do have a litter every 90 days (8-10/brood)--wild hogs don't quite do that good --but here is a math problem for you --suppose you had 5 sows in the wild and each have and raise 5 of her brood and half of her her brood was female and could breed when they were 6 months old How many wild hogs would you have at the end of the year?wild hogs usually have about three broods /year
    You can see why they are destroy so much
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2010
  11. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    This may sound stupid. But, I havent hunted since I was a kid. And then it was only rabbits. My question is, "Aren't hogs dangerous?" I have a friend that hog hunts with a 45-70. The way he talks, I thought they could mess you up pretty bad. If so, why would you want to use a .22?
     
  12. keitho

    keitho New Member

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    hunting hogs

    I once had a hog hit me from the side so hard it knocked me out of my boots but then my pard and I caught him live --the hog did not cut me --just knocked me straight up in the air and ran down the hill--I guess he thot that was fun and came back for more but this time I was ready and cornered him and caught him :D--Hog hunting is great ;)
     
  13. atm7819

    atm7819 New Member

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    I have seen plenty of hogs killed with a .22 while caught in a trap. On the other hand, I have seen hogs charge after being shot multiple times with a high powered rifle. Personally, I would not want to be in the woods with an angry hog and only a .22 for protection. But then again, I would not want to go after one with a knife either. :D
     
  14. keitho

    keitho New Member

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    what do y'all think

    One year my pard and I killed 30 wild hogs ---we ate them and always gave the farmer (Land owner) a choice of us having the hogs or him/her.After all they raised the hogs -so to speak-most often the land owner wanted at least one of the hogs caught on their place.Wild hog meat is GOOD.We started off shooting the hogs but that did not last long ---we decided for the sport of it we would stab the hogs with a k-bar--now that is up close and personal :D I am not a young man (tomorrow I will be 73) but did not want to be an arm chair hog hunter. We did not trap hogs,,we hunted hogs with dogs in the Ozarks.Please do not misunderstand me we always carry a side arm --sometimes as small as a .17 and sometimes as large as a 30/30 thompson center most often we carried a 9mm or a 357
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2010
  15. yazul42

    yazul42 Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I agree with 300,, if a shotgun is legal, carry some slugs or 00 buckshot, if that is legal in your area. If you bowhunt, take that. I broken many a cedar arrow loosing them at tree-rats with my longbow. Kill several a year that way,, just try and wait until they are on the ground,, dirt is not as hard on arrows as hickory trees. A quatering away shot, low in the heart area with a sharp broadhead, takes hogs down after a short run many times. Hogs are very good quarry for stalking, just watch the wind.

    Jeff
     
  16. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    A .22 mag in that revolver is almost identical to a .22LR out of a rifle as far as velocity and killing power.You said .22 rimfires are what's legal,so I would go all out and carry a .22 mag rifle for hogs,since a .22 mag out of a rifle is twice the power of a .22 mag out of that handgun.I would use the single six with .22lr or .22 short for small game and keep the .22 mag with you for hogs,if it's a rimfire they certainly can't say you weren't using that mag rimfire for small game.