What are your dry fire routines

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Mick3411, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. Mick3411

    Mick3411 New Member

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    Interested in hearing your dry firing routines and drills. With ammo so high I want to keep skills up through dry fire.
     
  2. FrontierTCB

    FrontierTCB Active Member

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    After a triple check to make sure weapon is clear while watching t.v. I will sometimes practice mag changes, tactical reloads etc. while keeping focused on the t. v. (threat). Making the transitions by feel and trying to quickly get back on target.

    I do this while I am home alone not just for safety but also so the old lady doesn't have me committed to a mental institution.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2013

  3. BeyondTheBox

    BeyondTheBox New Member

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    I don't believe in or subscribe to this whole "skill" thing. I don't practice drawing and firing when I shoot and I don't dry fire; I don't aim at things loaded or un- at home and don't think I'm Rambo.

    The only skill there is is accuracy. The rest you can't practice unless you put yourself in high stress and dangerous situations daily. It is quite impossible to imitate red zone defense.

    I don't at all believe muscle memory can overcome fear or stress when it wasn't developed in it, and find this whole concept Laughable.
     
  4. WonderingMind

    WonderingMind New Member

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    Buy some snap caps if you're going to dry fire. I practice every day when I am home off the road (OTR Trucker).
     
  5. lbwar15

    lbwar15 New Member

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    I wish there was a way to reset the trigger without having to operate the slide or action.
     
  6. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    Boxers confirm it every day. What they do on the heavy bag is what they do in the ring.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKEYipyU21w"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKEYipyU21w[/ame]
    This video displays how you can ingrain habits that carry over into the fight... whereas bad habits will get you killed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  7. Intheshop

    Intheshop New Member

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    Just spitballin here....but


    You probably should qualify your criteria into disciplines.Are we talking

    Hunting?

    Target?

    Self defense?

    Could go on a loong discussion just based on what crossovers there are on each of the above.And then break down THAT discussion into physical(muscle memory),mental,practical.

    "How" you practice is vital.Whether it's tactical or target.....only thing is,they may have completely different regimens?

    How "much" you practice.Usually varies between not only disciplines....but individuals.Ex:I know there's a match/tourney coming up on "this" exact date.I'll shoot(ha) for that in practice.You can not say that from a SD aspect.

    Break it down more.....exactly what are you trying to accomplish with your,in this case,dry-fire practice?For me,it's trigger control with a Dbl action revolver.I spend as MUCH time slowly releasing trigger as I do pulling it.This is where I"M needing practice.....it's trigger finger muscle memory.
     
  8. Mick3411

    Mick3411 New Member

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    Great questions. I am looking for self defense applications. Trigger control and site picture are what I focus on now - and will want to continue. Malfunction and reloading drills as well.
     
  9. NC1760

    NC1760 New Member

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    Just my 2 cents here...

    Why dry fire when there's airsoft? Because of the great ammo shortage my son and I are shooting airsoft in the backyard and mixing in an exercise routine to get our heart rates up. It also simulates the physical aspects of an actual fire fight situation. Just make sure you wear eye protection. Those little buggers ricochet everywhere !!
     
  10. kirbinster

    kirbinster New Member

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    I work on trigger control and sight picture using a SIRT laser trainer. This allows me to see where the shot would hit, feedback that I don't get with dry firing. When I dry fire with my normal gun everything always seems perfect. I can put an empty .22 cal casing on the front sight and it never falls, but that does little to show me what I am doing wrong. The laser trainer puts the dot on the actual hit location when the trigger is pulled and you get to see if it is a small dot or a drag.
     
  11. 70cuda383

    70cuda383 New Member

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    Yes. I agree with this post.

    we should never practice anything, because practice will never be like the real thing.

    when you're in practice, you cannot simulate the emotions, stress, excitement and feel of playing in, and trying to win, the super bowl; therefore, NFL teams should just stop practicing.
     
  12. jgoertz

    jgoertz New Member

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    I don't want to seem dense, but you are being sarcastic, right.
     
  13. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Why????

    Snap caps won't hurt anything, of course, but they're certainly not necessary.
     
  14. FrontierTCB

    FrontierTCB Active Member

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    Exactly.

    I read a story about a LEO that was involved in a shooting in the '80s that required him to do a reload during the incident. When the detectives investigated they couldn't find the 6 empty casings from his revolver.
    They took him back to the scene and he showed them where they should be still nothing. He eventually found them IN HIS FRONT POCKET. He explained that is where he placed his ejected brass when he went to the range to keep from having to bend over and pick them up.

    I agree there is no real way to simulate a life or death situation. The physical motions you make in training will likely be duplicated in combat.
     
  15. 70cuda383

    70cuda383 New Member

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    yes:D
    6 7 8 9 10
     
  16. 70cuda383

    70cuda383 New Member

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    by the way...why a requirement of 10 characters in a post? why can't we answer "yes/no" questions with "Yes/no"?


    OOOH!!!! and now I have to wait 45 seconds in between posts! guess I'm typing too fast!!!
     
  17. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    What's laughable is this whole post. Muscle memory is a key component to shooting proficiency and does not matter IN THE LEAST how is was developed.

    By your logic, it's useless to practice playing a musical instrument unless you are on stage, in front of a crowd, nervous and jittery. What baloney...

    OP-Don't let this poster influence your thinking with his obvious lack of experience with firearms. Dry fire practice is CRUCIAL in developing and maintaining a good fundamental skill set. Competetive shooters dry fire tens of thousands of times to keep good form as shooting is a perishable skill.

    Practicing dry fire, drawing from retention, sight acquisition, trigger control and follow through routinely will help you hone your skills and keep you well rehearsed should the time come when you need your firearm, whether it be at the range, competition or (God forbid) a self defense situation.

    Example-Ever driven a manual transmission for a long period of time, then get behind the wheel of an automatic? Notice how your foot goes for the (non-existent) clutch without even thinking about it? That's muscle memory. If you could draw, obtain a sight picture and fire the same way your foot went for the clutch...without having to think about it...how invaluable would that skill be to you should the need ever arise?

    Lasers are great for that, you can actually SEE what you're doing wrong and can adjust accordingly.

    Snap caps are great, if your firearm needs them. There's not a lightswitch, doorknob, lamp or picture frame in my house that hasn't been dry fired on thousands of times.

    And of course...safety first!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  18. lbwar15

    lbwar15 New Member

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    I like paint ball myself.
     
  19. jgoertz

    jgoertz New Member

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    At the risk of getting a time out, I am calling this guy a jerk. This and a couple of other posts on the forum recently make me think he is a kid troll with little or no knowledge of firearms.
     
  20. FrontierTCB

    FrontierTCB Active Member

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    I sometimes think it is a reflection of society today. Young people watch "reality shows" that depict constant conflict and scripted arguments and think that is the way life is supposed to be. They don't have enough life experience to know the difference.

    As a result some people post opinions that are only designed to get conflicting opinions and controversy going. I'm not sure they actually believe the info, but are merely looking for attention, negative or otherwise.

    While I'm at most of today's 25 year olds are like the 14 year olds of my day. EXAMPLES : Live at home with parents, play video games 8 hrs a day, thinking about getting a part time job etc.

    Ok, sorry guys Rant Over.

    Oh by the way I'm only 38 but things sure have changed in the last 15 yrs!
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013