What 1911 parts should I have on-hand?

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by CHLChris, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    Hello!

    I'm putting together a repair kit (for a SHTF situation in which I couldn't just go down to the corner gun store) for my AR-15 and my 1911.

    The AR situation is EASY. There are lots of repair kits with springs, etc. I got that issue dealt with.

    1911? Not so easy. There are lots of parts, but I'd like to know which parts I should have on hand so I could easily repair things.

    I've got a Springer Loaded Gov't. I don't think it has anything proprietary that I'd have to go to SA to buy. So what kits are available or a list of parts.

    I bet this has been asked, sorry.
     
  2. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I would suggest a complete set of springs and a set of pins. A firing pin, ejector and extractor is probably a good idea too. Maybe a barrel bushing link as well.

    Others may have some better ideas, but that's what I'd stock. Right now, all I have is a set of springs. I also have a spare slide stop that was left over from the rebuild, but I don't think those particularly go bad or break.
     

  3. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Here's a question......how many magazines do you have?
     
  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    easier to just get a couple of em. more fun too.

    anyway: all springs (including sear leaf spring), ejector, extractor, barrel link, barrel, slide stop, firing pin retaining block, all pins, many extra mags. pretty much everything but the slide and frame.
     
  5. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    Well, I've got 4 now. But I have 2 more Wilson 47DE's on the way. It is kinda funny having hundreds of rounds, but only a few mags. If something really bad went down, you really only have the number of rounds you ALREADY have in magazines.

    Here's a little focus to the original question: Anybody know a 1911 spare parts kit that I can buy without having to find each spring and pin? I think DPMS makes a kit, but MidwayUSA doesn't carry it (though they have a bunch of cool AR-15 parts kits...).

    I know the answer is get one or more of EVERY little part. But I'd love to get a dufus kit that has everything already in it.
     
  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Check Wolff for the springs and Brownell's for all the other parts.

    If you buy a spare "drop in" barrel, remember that isn't always the case and it may need to be fitted. The same for many other "drop in" parts.

    Brownell's isn't cheap, but they have pretty much anything you may need.
     
  7. skimbell

    skimbell New Member

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    Man, just Google 1911 part kits or 1911 Spring kits. Midway, Wilson, Brownells-kits everywhere. I got 3,800,000 hits in less than a quarter second.
    Not really a problem finding kits.
     
  8. Gordo323

    Gordo323 New Member

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    Yes but how many of those 3,800,000 hits contain the wisdom and knowledge of the people on FTF and what you really need?
    I’m curious too, great question CHL
     
  9. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    Check to see if your SAI has a .38Super, or .45ACP Firing pin, then buy a spare. Brownells has the SAI firing pins.

    Get an Ed Brown extractor, sear, disconnector, pins, barrel link and pin, thumb safety, slide stop, hammer. All springs.

    Have a good 'smith braze on your plunger tube, as it is common that they come loose (Causing bad jou jou).

    Get everything possible manufactured by Ed Brown. EB parts are as good as you can get these days (new).
     
  10. Flint Rock

    Flint Rock New Member

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    I would get a spare gun:D, that way you have one of everything!
     
  11. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    Considering I don't know what brazing is, what a plunger tube is, nor why it would cause only bad jou jou and not just a failure...I should probably learn a little more about my 1911.

    Hey guys, y'all should start suggesting people build their own 1911 from parts. I know exactly how my AR works cuz I built it. But my 1911 is still a mystery. Well, it's not rocket science, but I can't take it apart yet except for cleaning.
     
  12. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    The one thing I always make sure I have on hand are recoil springs. I have plenty of parts to rebuild now but ine one part that really need be paid attention to is that recoil spring. Using a new spring you can check the size of the one in your weapon. When it gets to 2-3 coils short then change it.

    It's good to have as many extra parts around as you can. I pick things up as I see them and the price is right. But truth be told I usually don't have to change anything but that recoil spring with any regularity. And that's only after a few thousand rounds.
     
  13. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    My range/competition kit includes:
    Recoil, sear, and firing pin spring
    A second firing pin, fitted extractor
    A fitted mag release (complete)
    A little bottle of oil.

    At home, I have enough Ed Brown / Wilson parts to rebuild almost any 1911 from the bare frame and slide.
     
  14. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    Sorry about that. The plunger tube in the little tube located above the left side stock/grip. It houses the plungers that keep the slide stop in place and allow the thumb safety to click up and down. The tubes frequently come loose and cause no end of trouble. I've done the "self repair" method at the range, using red loctite, but any decent gunsmith can silver solder/braze the tube in place. That is a permanent fix, and one that I recommend. The plunger tube assembly is is only staked in place from the factory.

    Bad Jou Jou is how I define a failure at an in-opportune moment, not just on the range.
     
  15. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Sometimes one can get by with a restake, but IMO it is best to get a new one. I "divot" the the inside of the frame where the tube legs go through, a touch of loc-tite, and stake the new tube.
     
  16. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    That's basically how I fixed mine at the range. Works just fine.

    But I can have one silver soldered on for about $10.
     
  17. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    These are all exactly why I think it is important for me (and every new 1911 owner) to completely take apart my 1911 so I can learn each part and be able to put it all back together.

    Right now I'm doing some searches for parts on Midway and there are a bunch of different springs to worry about. BTW, should I have on hand one of those (insert correct title here of that 3-prong fork-looking spring thing just behind the grip safety)? It is not usually in the spring sets.
     
  18. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    That "three fingered spring" is sear spring. It also serves to work the disconnector and grip safety. The only part on that spring to wear is the the center finger (the one for the disconnector), but it is still an important spring to replace on a regular basis.
     
  19. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    Alright, sear spring is on the list as a repair item, as are pins and springs. The extractor, disconnector, thumb safety, slide stop, and hammer are all upgrades, right? They aren't items that would normally break, right? I'm only asking because I'm looking for parts to buy, then toss in the drawer.

    You are suggesting items that if I buy I should switch out NOW, and then put the current items in the drawer as back-ups, right? Not bad advice, Rock, I'm just making sure we're on the same page.
     
  20. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    Extractor, disconnector, thumb safety, link pin, and slide stop are all parts that I have broken. Hammers only tend to break if you ever dry fire the pistol with the slide removed. Not that uncommon.

    Not a bad idea to get the Ed Brown parts, fit them to your gun and keep your factory parts as spares.

    Extractors tend to break if you are practicing failure drills and slamming the slide closed on a round in the chamber (not fed from the mag).

    Sears tend to break if you slam the slide shut on an empty chamber.

    Thumb safeties wear out, and can shear off. If the holes in your frame are not perfectly straight, pins will break (including the thumb safety, and slide stop).

    Brownells has the Ed Brown stuff.