weird bullet casting question.

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by JonM, Apr 14, 2013.

  1. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    ok i just finished installing my fume hood (homemade from plywood hvac duct work and sheetmetal) started casting some bullets using a lee 6 cavity .452 200grain mold. the bullets seem ok but weigh in at 210 grains...????

    is that right or am i doing something wrong the varience is +- .3 grains but they are all around 210 grains
     
  2. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    Different alloys will have different weights for the same bullets.
     

  3. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I have a bunch of those Lee molds. I like the 6 cavity the best by far. I also cast a 200 grain .452. Are you usining the round nose flat point? That is one of the ones my 1911 likes. I also use a 255 grain of that type. Great for IDPA.
     
  4. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Your alloy has a higher percentage of lead (It's heavier) than the alloy used to specify the bullet weight. ( usually Lyman #2)

    If cast in pure linotype, they would probably weigh in around 192-194.

    It shouldn't make any difference in low velocity rounds like .45 ACP. It's notrhing to worry about.:)
     
  5. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    What Loctus said. What alloy are you using? At 210 gr you may be using a too soft alloy. I prefer about 2-3% antimony and 1-2% Tin for my low velocity handgun bullets.

    You will also find that pure lead has more shrinkage. They may come out undersized if pure lead.
     
  6. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Ahh thanks that makes sense. Im casting pretty soft for shooting steel in cas. They are flat points to work well in my levergun and pistols. I thought the weight given was for 100% lead.

    Im just amazed at how fast i can crank out 500 bullets casting. Shoulda done this a looooong time ago. Still gota size and lube but casting is pretty easy
     
  7. Intheshop

    Intheshop New Member

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    Answer'd above....

    Reason for post is,keep track of "that" lot of bullets.Record their as cast weight and diameter.With an accurate enough firearm,you'll see *patterns develop.IOW's,a few grains and a few .0001's in diameter can make a difference.

    *No,not patterns like a shotgun....patterns in the data.

    PS,cool deal on taking the time to fabricate an exhaust hood.....way more professional.You can also add another fan......little farther away,litely blowing twds you.Ideally you want to be in a clean air "spot",inhaling clean air.
     
  8. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The "old" version of Lyman #2 was 90 percent lead, 5 percent antimony and 5 percent tin. (The hundred year old standby 90-5-5) IME, that's still a damn good alloy, and superior to the "new" Lyman #2.
     
  9. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Its got enough suction to pick up the smoke from the flux. No casting pot gets hot enough for lead fumes.

    Ill take pics of my setup its all diy cept for the ducting. Had a friend of mine install the ductwork as he does it for a living.

    After sizing they are all coming out exactly .451. Using alox for lube it seems less hassel than using parrafin or other lube methods.

    Used a little on top of em in a bucket, shook em up good poured em onto a sheet of wax paper and let em sit over nite just like the instructions said and they came out less messy than cast lubed 45-70 bullets i bought a few months back. Everything i read about alox was not my experience so far
     
  10. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Lyman #2 is good for loads in the 900-1200 fps range. It is excessively hard for low velocity applications like .38 Spl, .44-40 and .45 ACP plinking loads.
     
  11. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    True. but back "in the day" when the local newspaper sold off linotype for $20/hundredweight, I used it for making Lyman #2 for dang near everything from 38 full wadcutter to 210 grain loads for full power .30-40 Krag (with GC of course.)

    Sure wish I could still go to the paper and get another 1/2 ton whenever needed. :eek:

    When they switched over to offset, I bought 2 tons. Didn't last long though.:(
     
  12. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    That would be SWEEEEEET! I fell into some Lino a couple of years back. Traded some brass and bought some for $1.75/lb. I wish I could have bought a few hundred more pounds.

    I just picked up about 100# of wheel weights from a local tire shop for $40. I would like to have about 500 more pounds.
     
  13. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    be careful most of the weights nowadays are steel. the lead ones are often contaminated with gods know what from china as thats where wheel weight metal comes from in most cases. be careful smelting it down.
     
  14. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Many of the new wheel weights are a zinc alloy. I have come to recognize them by sight, but they are not a problem. I keep my pot turned down enough so the zinc weights will not melt. They simply float to the top and get skimmed off with the steel clips.

    I segregate the stick on weights (pure lead) from the clip on weights (Lead-Antimony alloy) so I get two different batches of ingots. Each are marked with a sharpie so I can blend them accordingly for casting.
     
  15. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    What temp do you use for this?
     
  16. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I do not use a thermometer, I judge by when the lead weights melt thoroughly. My thermostat is messed up on both my furnaces anyway.

    Virgin lead will melt at a slightly higher temp than Lead/Antimony or Lead/Antimony/Tin alloy.

    I was just sorting through the batch I got yesterday and noticed the "suspect" weights were mostly marked "fe". Of course I presumed this to mean they were "ferrous" or contained iron. Sure enough, they were attracted to a magnet. They got segregated right off. I will pay attention tomorrow when I melt/flux for other signs. I believe the zinc weights are marked "zn". I will confirm.
     
  17. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I cast many thousands of 240 grain .44s ands 168 gr .357 from straight lino for max loads in my magnums.:)

    Sure miss readily available linotype.

    F**K OFFSET LITHOGRAPHY!:p:p
     
  18. Ricochet

    Ricochet New Member

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    when i get 5 gallon buckets of ww from the locate tire stores, it will have a good bit of steel and zinc mixed in, but about 3/4 of the bucket will still be lead. the steel and zinc ones never make it into my smelting pot since i go thru them all. I'm planning to pick up some 50/50 (lead,tin) solder and make my own lyman #2
     
  19. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you're casting for pistol only, try straight WW. I love 50/50 but it's gotten so damn prohibitively expensive:mad::mad::mad:
     
  20. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    casting your own is always going to be cheaper than buying them pre-made since your not paying for the labour and markup on the raw materials.