weighing surplus?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by unclebear, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. unclebear

    unclebear New Member

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    I've started weighing my surplus ammo to get a better idea of how different the weights are, because I weigh the entire bullet together I don't know what single thing makes one bullet heavier then the others. But it does allow me to group them with each other for a hope of better accuracy. I went out and shot a 3" group at 30 yards with some 253 Ove Gr bullets. Which I'm not going to lie that's the best group I've shot with the cheap surplus ammo.

    Considering I'm usually to broke to buy the good ammo (when you can find it) I'm hoping I have something here.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    The case weight is going to have the greatest varience.

    Weighing the whole cartridge is pointless unless your trying to find one without a powder charge.
     

  3. unclebear

    unclebear New Member

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    I've never had that happen? Is that type of thing common?
     
  4. Kraj

    Kraj New Member

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    He's saying that weighing the whole thing isn't going to offer any information. The cases weight is a little different, the bullet weight is slightly different, the powder charge is going to vary a little. By the time it's all together the total weight isn't very useful information as far as accuracy is concerned.
     
  5. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Uncle,
    No it is very rare that a round gets out that has zero powder in it however it can happen. But as the guys said doing this with the round completely assembled will not give you any valuable information. For example when I was doing bench rest shooting several years ago. I used one manufacturers cases and kept the ones that weighed the same together in groups of five when loaded or empty. Used the same type of powder once I found the one that worked the best and the exact grain of powder, cases and bullets that gave me the tightest group at 100 yards. As they stated there is no way of telling once the round is assembled. Reloading is the only way to do what you are attempting since a few tenths of a grain of powder can make the difference. And when you get it right the shot group will close together like they are being pulled together tight in a noose!

    03
     
  6. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    You mean you are weighing the entire cartridge.
    The bullet is just the projectile.

    Do not waste your time. It will not provide any
    statistically relevant information to you.
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    when your handloading its late at nite and you cant remember if you charged that one case or not before putting the bullet on. its a handy way to find the odd one out.
     
  8. unclebear

    unclebear New Member

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    Thanks for the info guys really appreciate it, I need to do more research into reloading. I appreciate it.