Webley Mk VI - .455 Webley or .45 ACP?

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by JoeB1987, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. JoeB1987

    JoeB1987 New Member

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    Recently, my grandfather passed away. As unfortunate as this was, I came in to possession of this 1915 Webley Mark VI.

    I've yet to do anything other than a quick once over of the basic functions of the gun. Everything seems to function as it should; the trigger, hammer, and the break-action. It definitely needs a good cleaning though.

    I did a little research and found after the first world war, many of these original Mk. IV models (which were chambered in .455 Webley) were machined to fit .45 ACP. I'm hoping this is not the case with this piece, but I was unable to find any clarification on identifying this online. I was hoping one of you would be able to help me.

    I also had one other question. With this being my first antique firearm, I am unsure how to go about cleaning it, are there certain cleaning solutions that are considered too strong or abrasive to use on this old steel / finish?

    Any input is greatly appreciated, thanks in advance!

    - Joe
     

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  2. Belltactical

    Belltactical New Member

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    If it was re-chambered for the acp you will need moon clips if you were to try and shoot it but I would definitely have a smith look it over to make sure it's safe and timed right. It's certainly in the collectible category so you my not want to shoot it. Best bet might be to find a shop with an ultrasonic cleaner and use nylon brushes and clp but if it's really bunked up, some #9 shouldn't hurt anything. If its not too bad, hit it with gun scrubber or brake cleaner.
     

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Found one of those in Iraq. If I could go back in time, I'd still be walking funny from smuggling that thing home....

    I'd clean it just like any other gun. If your unsure of the chambering, you can take it to a qualified smith and they should be able to tell you what's up, unless someone comes along with a method for finding out. If ask else fails, pm c3shooter, he'll probably know something.
     
  4. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Molding the bore is the surest way like Trip said -
    Dam sure be worth it-
    My smith charges about $30 last i had such done
     
  5. Belltactical

    Belltactical New Member

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    Just talked to the crusty old guy down the road who has a collection that fills up an entire room and then some. He said that most, but not necessarily all of them that were re-chambered had a proof mark denoting .45ACP just in front of the cylinder. He generally knows his stuff when it comes to antiques and collectibles.
    Hope that helps.
     
  6. JoeB1987

    JoeB1987 New Member

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    I'll take it down to the local gunsmith soon and see. I'm not seeing a .45 ACP mark in front of the cylinder, so I'm hoping this is a good sign.

    Thanks for the info, much appreciated guys.
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Heck it might would work out better for you if it were .45 ACP, the .455 Webley isn't stocked at Wally Whirl any more!
     
  8. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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  9. natman

    natman Member

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    Judging by the huge gap between the rear of the cylinder and the shiny rear face of the cylinder, it appears to have been cut for 45 ACP / Autorim.

    I would only shoot lead bullets with very mild loads in it. 45 ACP is loaded to higher pressures than 455 Webley.

    http://britishmilitariaforums.yuku....-REVOLVERS-ALTERED--SHOOT-45-ACP--45-Auto-Rim

    Most of the conversions were done in machine shops in the US. It would be interesting to see a picture of a proof mark that denotes a 45 ACP conversion.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012
  10. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The .45 ACP uses slightly higher pressure than .455 was designed for.

    If it was mine, I'd stick to low velocity "target" type loads.

    Those are too nice as collectible old warhorses to take chances with.

    BTW, congratuations. That's one darn nice piece! :p
     
  11. natman

    natman Member

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    The 45 ACP uses almost half again as much pressure as the loads the 455 was designed for. I wouldn't call that "slightly higher". Plus the chambers and throat on the Webley weren't designed for jacketed bullets, which would raise the pressures still higher.

    Read the link.


     
  12. natman

    natman Member

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    The 45 ACP uses almost half again as much pressure as the loads the 455 was designed for. I wouldn't call that "slightly higher". Plus the chambers and throat on the Webley weren't designed for jacketed bullets, which would raise the pressures still higher.

    Read the link for more info.

    I agree that they are too nice to risk blowing up. If you have an original, uncut Webley, shoot it with Fiocchi factory ammo. If you have one that's been cut, shoot it with low pressure handloads with lead bullets.