Weatherby, Browning, or Baretta?

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Tjurgensen, Jun 4, 2013.

  1. Tjurgensen

    Tjurgensen New Member

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    Im looking for a new rifle and have narrowed my caliber down to a 270 WSM. Now im debating on the gun. My decision is between a Weatherby Vanguard Series 2 sporter, a Browning X-Bolt Hunter, or a Tikka T3 Lite. The Weatherby and Browning have a wooden stock and the Tikka is synthetic. Both the Weatherby and Tikka have a 24" barrel but the Browning is 23". All three look to be quality rifles, unfortunately I have never owned a Browning, Barreta, or Weatherby rifle so I don't know which is better or the qualities each hold. Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks
    -TJ
     
  2. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    What are ya gonna use the gun for? Hunting, or target shooting, or both?
     

  3. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    The Tikka is a great rifle. I prefer the monte carlo stocks better and the Weatherby Vanguard series 2 is a very good rifle for the money (made by Howa). I just bought a synthetic one in 223 for back home and luv it. I have no experience with the Brownings.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Tjurgensen

    Tjurgensen New Member

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    I will mainly be using it for hunting.
     
  5. triggerjob

    triggerjob New Member

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    24" inch barrel seems kind of old school. I would think think 18" is about as long as you would want for an actual gun you planned on carrying.

    You're only going to lose 50 to 75 fps with the shorter barrel but you'll pick up accuracy, and manueverability.

    Is anybody else pujzzled by the barrel lengh?

    Also, all of your choices are great brands. I would lean toward the wood stock, as they look nicer. You can order a plastic stock online if the need arises and have a drop in fit. But its not likely you get as good a wood stock unless you innish it your self
     
  6. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    First time I ever heard a shorter barrel is more accurate than a longer barrel? Any links for me to read up on and learn about?
    I mean, I understand about the harmonics and wobble of short vs longs, etc, but for hunting, and not using a bench, a longer barrel is more stable to hold on target than a shorter lighter barrel.
    But if a shorter barrel is now more accurate, then why are all the varmint hunters using ar-15s going for longer mid to full length barrels, and not the shorter 18 in barrel?
    And if you are using iron sights, wouldn't the longer sight radius work better for accuracy, than a shorter sight radius? I'm confused.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2013
  7. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Light mountain rifles? That is a marketing ploy. Have you struggled to stalk a Bull elk above the timber line. When you finally get a shot across a snow field you are trying to hold a rifle steady.
    Your heart rate is at max speed, your lungs are sucking cold air, your eyes are filling with water. And that light short rifle has a muzzle roll that won't quit. That is when you realize that the longer barrel and higher comb was worth the extra effort.;)
     
  8. triggerjob

    triggerjob New Member

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  9. mdauben

    mdauben New Member

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    Really, they are all very good rifles and I don't think you could go far wrong with any of them. Do you have any preference between wood and synthetic? If it was me, I'd try handling and shouldering all three and see which one fits you better. I think in this case that would matter more than the minor differences between the three.

    I think it really comes down to the cartridge. I'm not sure if this applies as much to the new short magnums (don't know much about their ballistics), but for most magnums or other high pressure cartridges I would want that 24 inch barrel to wring the best performance out of the cartridge. Otherwise why bother? With such cartridges lopping 5-6 inches off the barrel is probably going to cost you 2-300fps.

    If I wanted a short barreled hunting rifle, I'd probably be looking at something in .308 or maybe 7mm-08.
     
  10. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Trigger Job, Honestly have you ever really hunted big game of any kind? Anyone who is never stressed by hunting at high elevations most likely died of a heart attack hours earlier.;)
     
  11. Tjurgensen

    Tjurgensen New Member

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    Thanks for all the suggestions!
     
  12. triggerjob

    triggerjob New Member

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    My further research has led to think 20" is the right place to be, with this calibur, so muzzle blast doesn't rip your face off. But what's 4 inches among friends
     
  13. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Triggerjob, what do you think for the slower burning powder calibers?
     
  14. triggerjob

    triggerjob New Member

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    That's why I changed my comment. The diff. Between 18 and 20 is a lot based on the other stuff I read about this particular catridge.

    In general though, its science not opinion, that shorter and consequently more rigid barrels are more accurate. The tactical guys have been moving this way for years.

    As for sight radious, I've never thought there to be a big diff in usability between an 18 or 26 inch gun which is the longest I've personally shot.

    But to each his own. Most of the talk I used to hear aroung the gunstore about needing longer barrels for hunting was largly fueled by BS and wives tales.

    So far the only thing I've read in the longer barreled debate that has validitity is the muzzle blast arguement.

    Velocity drops are minor around 1% an inch cut, unless you're shooting out passed 800 yards or so it ain't gonna matter.

    As for huffing and puffing needing a long barrel to steady your winded elk shot after climbing a mountain, a longer barrel doesn't solve this delima it actually accentuates it. You see as you huff and puff and try and steady yourself the end of a long barrel moves more in relation that a short one would. Its geometry a hard science. The only wiegh to damper huffing and puffing for your mountinous elk shot is to either not shoot winded, or use the marine corp sit position or other proper stance.

    I suppose a heavier rifle would dampen the hufing and puffing to.

    I'm not trying to piss in anybody's wheaties, hell 50 years ago people were trapsing around the woods with 28" rifles, civil war rifles were 5.5 feet long.

    Wher the poor deer gets blasted with a 15 TC pistol, or your 23" rifle he's jsut as dead.
     
  15. Salvo

    Salvo New Member

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    Shooting 270 WSM out of a short barrel is not particularly clever. - You get .270 Winchester velocity - and lots of extra muzzle-blast.

    If you are going to insist upon a short barrel, why not just shoot .270 Winchester for the same performance - minus the blast?

    The "M" in 270 WSM stands for "Magnum" which ought to be a pretty good clue that it's going to need at least 24" or so of barrel if you want the performance that the cartridge is capable of.

    Remember, it is the bullet and its velocity, not the muzzle-blast, that does the work on a hunting rifle.
     
  16. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    A shorter barrel may be more accurate than a longer barrel, maybe, but only used with a rest or bipod etc. A longer barrel (to a point) is still more stable and accurate shooting freehand. so choose accordingly. I myself shoot 'oldschool' cartridges where a longer barrel can burn off all the powder, and deliver a faster bullet downwind, minimizing bullet drop. So my 24 inch Weatherby, and 22 inch Sako rifles are more suited for my tastes.




    What I don't understand about this is then why do long range artillery guns have such long barrels. They are very accurate, no?
     
  17. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    People who learn hunting in a gun store and quote Field & Stream pretty well answers my question.:D
     
  18. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Long range artillery pieces have what may seem like long barrels, because they have heavy projectiles and lots of powder to accelerate them. If you look at the size if cartridge the barrel isn't that long relatively speaking.

    Accuracy doesn't come from barrel length. It comes from regularity if the bore and the metal. In a rifle the only real advantages you get are more potential velocity, and if using iron sights, a longer sight radius. But it is harder to make a long barrel with a perfect bite than a short one. Also harder to make a long barrel stress free, during the boring and rifling process. A shorter barrel if the same diameter is more rigid, and less likely to have uneven warping from stress points during temperature changes.
     
  19. triggerjob

    triggerjob New Member

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    No, they aren't danger close is 500 meters for artillery strikes.