water well question

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by hdwrench, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. hdwrench

    hdwrench New Member

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    ok so i am fairly new at the water well scene . i bought a cabin 3 years ago and dont know much about this well (or wells period ). i took the well cap off recently and noticed some junk stuck in near the top of my well . just some sticks and some rust scaleing (good sized hunks )near the top . it got me to thinking do wells ever have to be cleaned out ? i vaguely remember reading something about this on the net ? info greatly needed ......

    by the way , i believe it is a deep well, with a steel caseing and an electric pump which is piped into the cabin . mainly used for washing now do to an iron (i think,due to brown staining in sinks) content .we haul water from home to drink (mostly coffee and for the dog ).someday we will move to this location so i am considering a filter system (whole house ).....
     
  2. Shihan

    Shihan Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I do not have any idea. But the Guys over here PlumbingForum may be able to help.
     

  3. Jo da Plumbr

    Jo da Plumbr New Member

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    Dont know wells, but rusty water can come from old galvanized pipes.

    Have to change the pipes to copper to fix that.
     
  4. suprdave

    suprdave New Member

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    You can have a well guy look at it, but it doesn't sound like it needs cleaning. You can have a filtration and chlorination system added for a fairly reasonable price. No filtration sounds like it's the iron (red-water) problem. FYI, Iron won't hurt you at all...just looks nasty!
     
  5. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Well Water

    As Per your request, Just search Well Water on the net and you will find all the answers to your questions. Don't use this water for anything untill you have it tested. Wills in Da Swamp in La. One Shot One Kill......
     
  6. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    For the most part wells don't need anything done to them. My mom has a 125' well my dad has a 230' well. My moms we had to lower at one point because the water table dropped to apoint where the pump was not in any water. Later on we had to replace the pump. Our pump was on 2" PVC and after 15 years of work it broke off. The pump was attached to the well top by a rope.

    Well pumps have a lot of torque because they are pumping water 100+' up and out with a good amount of pressure. I would get a water test kit from Home Depot or Lowes and test the water.

    Wells are a don't fix it till it breaks kind of deal.
     
  7. suprdave

    suprdave New Member

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    For once, there is a question in my area of expertise! If you set up a filtration system, it will take care of the iron. If you set up a disinfection (chlorine) system it will take care of the water-born pathogens (giardia, crypto-sporidium). It won't be as expensive as you think.
     
  8. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    +1 I've lived on well water for most of my life and never had one cleaned. Had pumps, pressure switches and leader pipe replaced but never had one cleaned.
     
  9. gorknoids

    gorknoids New Member

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    We had sulphur water on the farm, and Dad set up a settling/aeration tank to settle out the solids and oxygenate the water some. It consisted of a big tank with a hole on the top. No filter, no nothin'. From there, it was pumped into the stone cistern under the house, and we didn't drink it.
     
  10. hdwrench

    hdwrench New Member

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    sounds good and thanks . i will have a test done to the water . no galv. pipes in the system that i know of .the pipe going in is plastic , and inside is a ll copper . the rust in inside the well caaseing and possibly in the water itself .
     
  11. gorknoids

    gorknoids New Member

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    If the iron in the water lasts for more than 10 seconds, it's not the piping.