Water proof matches?

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by bizy, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. bizy

    bizy New Member

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    Why would a person want 500 water proof matches? 1 bic lighter will give you 1,000s of lights and it is truley water proof..
     
  2. gregs887

    gregs887 New Member

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    Bic lighters are a ***** to light in the wind and rain. Waterproof matches will generally hold up to strong winds as well.
     

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I not only have lots of both, I also have flints and steels and different types of fire starters. Do I need all of them? To my way of thinking, I do. One is none, two is one, etc.

    If you depend on a Bic lighter and it somehow leaks out its gas, matches will come in handy. Now obviously, it's just prudent to have more than one lighter. I have bunches of them and I keep them scattered about. However, I prefer the belt and suspenders approach. If necessary, I can go without food for quite a while. Heat and water, not so much.

    Speaking of water, do you have good purification and storage setups?
     
  4. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Everytime i get a lighter wet i gotta let it dry... the waterproof matches i have burn for 12 seconds no mater what (even underwater!:eek:)
     
  5. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Right now, take your BIC lighter. Go to the kitchen, and run a few drops of water over the flint. Now light it. :eek: They are FAR from waterproof, not windproof, and in VERY long storage, not highly reliable.

    I have a small fishing boat- and keep an "Aw CRAP!" bag in the live well. It includes a magnesium fire starter, and a truly waterproof matchcase with waterproof, strike anywhere lifeboat matches. I also tuck a couple of pouches of the old ration heating tablets (Trioxane fuel) in there. I hope never to need them for anything beyond lighting a good cigar when fishing, and my lighter runs out.

    However, I have a limited vocabulary. If I ever find myself crouched on a sandbar at night, after some IDIOT with a ski boat sank my little Jon boat, and I am headed for hypothermia, I don't think I have a sufficent amount of profanity to deal with a wet lighter and damp driftwood.
     
  6. jungleman

    jungleman New Member

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    I won't say I carry more than half a dozen waterproof matches. As regards lighters, and able to get 500 lights out of one, it's when you have used it for 499 times, and you either run out of the gas, or your flint is worn out. Give me a knife with a fire steel built into the knife sheath. I have 2 knives, and both have the fire steel in the sheath. Fire steels, I have a couple of "C" shaped ones that produce a good reliable spark. I also have a plunger type firestarter that when depressed, concentrates a shower of sparks just where you want to. What happens to the guys who use a lighter, and the one that uses matches, when they both run out, I will still have my knives and fire steels and starter. I too am a firm believer of being a belt and braces man myself why?. it's called self preservation, How would you use 500 matches or a lighter to build a shelter cut wooden feathers for your fire etc.or skin any Game you may have caught.There is no MATCH ;) for the good old fashioned way of Bushcraft.Trioxane is the usual way I start my fires like c3shooter.
    Jungleman
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2011
  7. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    To barter with people who don't have a BIC lighter?
     
  8. Ploofy

    Ploofy New Member

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    Whenever I'm planning a long trek, I have 3 separate boxes of matches that contain a variety of waterproof matches and I generally have a box of ohio bluetips, too. Why? Because the first thing to get broken when you set your pack down, or fall into the water when you get a drink, will be your lighter. Once I even had the flint on a brand new lighter break off for it's first use. Though, a high quality Zippo one would be a decent investment. I also used to have a lighter that burned some high intensity gas, but I ran out of the refill, and forgot what the fuel was. Apart from that, the thing was indestructible and water tight.
     
  9. NitroxAZ

    NitroxAZ New Member

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    A cheaper alternative to buying them is to dip regular strike matches clear nail polish to make them "waterproof"
     
  10. Seven

    Seven New Member

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    Mini-Maglite, two staples, steel wool.

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  11. Seven

    Seven New Member

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    ...continued from previous post.

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    baam!

    [​IMG]
     
  12. oneshot

    oneshot New Member

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    Just a heads up and I know some of you guys can already do this but it does not matter how many lighters you have or how many waterproof matches youy have you still need the skills to light a fire in the wind and the rain and need to practice those skills regularly. We had a issuse this weekend on our campout about getting the fire going on Sat. evening in the pouring rain with 35 mph winds we got it but it took time. Luckely nobody was suffering from hypo. or we would have had to think of other ways to get it going ie coleman fuel

    My opion the wet fire tender and the strike force is one good combo. Of course you want several backup just in case.
     
  13. OzarkRecluse

    OzarkRecluse New Member

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    For absolute, life and death, hyperthermia type situations, I keep a couple of road flares in my jeep. They'll start a fire in pouring rain. There are some safety issues so they are not to be used lightly but if I'm stuck out somewhere and having a fire is going to keep me or my wife out of trouble then I know this is an option. I also carry a lighter, some Tinder-Quik, and a Spark-lite. Because we live in such an isolated area where cell phone service is not available a lot of the time we try to be prepared.
     
  14. RONSERESURPLUS

    RONSERESURPLUS New Member

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    It's called OPTIONS!

    Hello all, RON L here - SERE SURPLUS

    When it comes to Fire making I LIKE to call it OPTIONS!

    Magnify Glass
    Steel Wool and battery, Zippo Lighter
    Bic or other Disposable Lighter
    Swedish Firesteel
    Strike anywhere matches in a water Proof case

    C3 makes a valid Pointl any Item that used flint once wet won't spark till it's dry competly! Try it? I like the Swedish Firesteel as it will strike a 5000 deg Spark dripping water still? LOL I add a Small Container of magnesium chips and I can start a Fire darn near under water? LOL

    Try your Kit out, then the gaps in them will be obvious, thats why OPTIONS MATTER!

    RON
     
  15. jungleman

    jungleman New Member

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    Hi. Has anyone used "Fatwood" shavings, or better still fatwood dust?.to start a fire. keep some in your grab bag,
    This wood contains resin, which burns extremely well.

    Jungleman
     
  16. Seven

    Seven New Member

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    You can mix sawdust with paraffin wax and mold them into blocks using those tiny muffin paper cup thingies. Makes a helluva fire starter.

    But, it's cheaper just to buy a commercial firelog and use a hacksaw and your fingers to form pieces into little blocks that will fit into a 1" x 2" ziploc baggie. You can make 100 out of a single $3 fire log.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. fireguy

    fireguy New Member

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    In my bag I have a fire steel, regular stick matches, disposable lighter, 9v battery and fine steel wool.

    As tinder I have cotton balls that I have rubbed petroleum jelly into as well as some tissue. I did a test with the cotton balls and found that with the petroleum jelly added they burned for over 4 minutes, that should be plenty of time to get kindling started. I also have a few trioxane bars just in case.
     
  18. oneshot

    oneshot New Member

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    You can mix sawdust with paraffin wax and mold them into blocks using those tiny muffin paper cup thingies. Makes a helluva fire starter.

    I have hear you can find paraffin wax at Lowes or Home Depot but I have been unable to locate it. Do you know roughly were to look at?
     
  19. cuate

    cuate New Member

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    Roll your own

    As a Boy Scout in long ago days I made my own waterproof matches by dipping the match heads and a little farther down the matchstick in melted
    parrafin which any hardware store or grocery should have.

    They worked...One of the Scout requirements for the 2nd Class Badge as I recall was building a fire with two (2) matches. But I don't tell my age so it was a while back.
     
  20. jungleman

    jungleman New Member

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    Cotton wool balls soaked in petroleum jelly is one of the best I have used, Have you tried dried tree fungus?.

    Jungleman