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I know nothing absoulutely nothing about reloading except that I want to get into it. What is the equipment that I need to get? I purchased the Sierra manual today. I am looking for reliable equipment, and equipment that I wont need to replace in 6 months after I get going and get the hang of things. Money is an issue in the sense that I dont want to get something and then have to replace it because it is for "beginners".
 

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Any reloading kit from Lyman, RCBS or Lee will suffice for a lifetime of use. The only reason to "upgrade" is to go for higher volume. I used a friend's RCBS for several years through College. When I got out on my own, I bought a Dillon. That was a very good choice as I have been using it w/o problems for nearly 25 years.
It really depends on how much shooting you plan on doing. My rule of thumb is less than 200 rounds a month - single stage, 200-400 rounds a month turret press or progressive, over 400 rounds a month - definately progressive.

Dillon used to make the AT 500. It was basically the RL 550 w/o the powder measure and auto primer feature. You could upgrade with those parts later. I do not see it cataloged now, but you might find one on gun broker or similar sites.
 

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Before you go out and buy any equipment (RC10MM's suggestions are good), you should get a book on general loading and read it through. The ABCs Of Reloading is a good one. In my opinion the 5th Edition is the best, they're at the 7th or 8th now. The 5th might still be found in a library. If not, the newest is still a very good book. That will give you a pretty good idea of what's involved, help you make choices suited to your situation.

DC
 

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Super info on the download Tango

Here you go this is will get you going and you can add to your bench as you go on.
For me-I started with the RCBS RockChucker in early "70's", added on a Dillon RL550 in the "80's" and have been happy with both. To do it again (start out) I would buy all Dillon dies when I could. To me they just work better in most applications. I DO use the Lee Factory Crimp Die on my semi-auto pistol rounds, as a last step, and check with an overall case guage afterwards. No more failures on semi-auto loads after these 2 steps. Still use the RockChucker for most rifle loads, esp. for the most accuate varmit (22-250) loads.:)
 

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Good manual first.

;)As been mentioned before, the FIRST step on getting into handloading, is acesss to good books. Start out at your local library, for the most current load books that they have. I really like the Lyman Handbook. It gives all the old,and new info, and covers a large section on bullet casting, and loading of cast bullets. I do not load(at this time) any cast rifle loads, but I load several hard cast pistol loads-38/357-9mm-44spl/mag-45acp. After you decide that this is your "cup of tea" then buy the most current Lyman Handbook. This should work for you- it did for me!:D
 
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