Walnut stock? I don't know wood.

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by Commocarl, May 3, 2012.

  1. Commocarl

    Commocarl New Member

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    I have an all weather 10/22 with the synthetic stock. I really don't like the way it feels, so I was interested in getting a wood stock.

    I went to the local gunshop and bought an old beat up one for $35. The finish was peeling and it wasn't going to last that way. I started looking around on the internet about refinishing wood rifle stocks, there is a video on redoing a 10/22 stock. It looked easy enough so I figured what the heck, I have plenty of time on my hands.

    My intent was to stain it ebony, strip the paint off the barrel band and buttpiece(as they are aluminium), and polish them to match the barrel. I have finished my first layer of stripper and the color isn't coming off, it is a really nice dark brown. The whole receiver/barrel cavity is the same color as the rest of the stock. There is a hole bored into the butt and it is the same color all the way in.

    Did ruger build walnut 10/22 stocks?
     
  2. Bsciolino

    Bsciolino New Member

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    Yes they do have some 10/22s in a walnut stock. Walnut has always been the most common wood when working stocks because it's easy, beautiful, and it lasts. American walnut is becoming more rare but with the dozen or more types of walnut available I don't think its going to go away any time soon. More people are moving to laminate and synthetic but I think when it comes to working on a stock walnut is great. After you strip everything off it you should use a white wet rag and a iron and put the wet rag on the stock then use the steam option on the iron and steam the wood. This will pull up any minor dents and pull more color out of the stock. Don't let the rag dry out though. I bought a cheap stock and am going to dye it blue because I always wanted to learn how to dye a stock lol. Hope this helps.
     

  3. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Pics please guys. Look forward to seeing the progress.
     
  4. Commocarl

    Commocarl New Member

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    I have looked into it more, I have seen the deluxe model with a checkered wood stock and rubber butt plate. This one is not checkered and had the painted metal butt plate.

    I tried to get a picture of what I used as stripper, dang glare.

    Don't look at the shoes...... don't look at the shoes!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Commocarl

    Commocarl New Member

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    I kind of don't know where to go from here. I was really looking forward to the ebony stained stock.
    If this is walnut, I will not go there.

    I have not ironed her yet.....................yet. That is my next step.

    I will continue with this stock, no stain just 10 coats of birchwood casey Tru-oil.

    I still plan on stripping and polishing the barrel band and butt plate.

    there will be more pictures
     
  6. Bsciolino

    Bsciolino New Member

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    It looks like walnut to me but I am no expert. With steaming you can certainly get more color out of it. If you google search walnut blanks you can see pictures of ones unsealed and they can be very light in color so you can probably pull a lot more color out of it during the steaming process.
     
  7. Commocarl

    Commocarl New Member

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    more questions.....


    Is polyurithane good enough to cover the metal parts after polishing, or should I use something else?
     
  8. Bsciolino

    Bsciolino New Member

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    Got me there I just use a light coating of oil on all my metal parts. I have never tried to use polyurethane. I am curious what others will say to this.
     
  9. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    If you are stripping the metal parts and want a "bare/raw" look on them you will to use a clear coat on them.
    I wouldn't recommend poly.
     
  10. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    that sure looks like walnut to me too. very dark walnut. i would very lightly sand it with some 320 grit sandpaper after you get any of the dings and dents out and do the Tru-oil you were talking about. the more clear the oil will just bring out the grain pattern without darkening the wood further. the metal pieces, i would get a good grade of clear coat made for metal and put a few very light coats on it.
     
  11. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ruger used to use walnut for their 10-22 stocks. My daughter has one of my old 10-22's with a walnut stock. I would say you lucked out. I like Tung Oil for a finish.
     
  12. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    My 1989 Ruger has a walnut stock. Very nice. Congrats
     
  13. Commocarl

    Commocarl New Member

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    Thanks guys!

    The stock is tight pushing the front of the receiver in.

    Synthetic Stock drops right in.
    [​IMG]


    Wood stock, notice there is no gap at the front of the receiver.
    [​IMG]


    It is really close on the sides of the barrel.
    [​IMG]

    I almost think the tight fit will be good and stabilize the receiver. it is only tight there. I checked to make sure.

    I am a little concerned with the stock touching the sides of the barrel. Should I take some of that off?

    One last full shot of the rifle in the wood stock.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2012
  14. big shrek

    big shrek Well-Known Member

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    Shoot it first...see if it makes any real difference.
    Sometimes the tightness of a stock will hold it steady...ya never know...
     
  15. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    CommoCarl, looks real good so far. like Big Shrek suggested, try it ou and see. there are those who glass bed 10/22's just like people do with any other rifle.

    as a suggestion, i too like JTJ, like the Tung oil for a finish on wood. i used it years ago when refinishing furniture, and the end results on nice peice of wood are amazing. it's also very easy to use and get good results with. you can find it at any home improvement store or hardware store. the most common brand available is Formby's. also this line of products is excellent for stocks made of good wood.
     
  16. Commocarl

    Commocarl New Member

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    Isn't the Birchwood Casey Tru-oil pretty much the same thing?

    I was planning on the first coat tonight.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2012
  17. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    been a long time since i used either, but the Tru Oil is more of a sealer and has to dry. the tung oil is a hand rubbed oil finish that you can apply and rub into the wood with either a rag or very fine steel wool and can be applied at anytime.
     
  18. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    The tru-oil is a better finish. It seals and protects better.
     
  19. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    Tung oil is basicaly the same as BC. It too has to dry. You can start with BLO (boiled linseed oil) to bring the wood back to life then use Tung oil. I usuallu wind up with around 20 coats. Use 0000 steel wool about every second coat then finish the last coat with 600 wet sand. Then polish it with your bare hand and a lot of rubbing. Its a little time consuming but it's worth it. If you ever mar it you can spot finish and it won't show.

    If there is only 1 screw holding the action in, do not relieve the barrel and the stock mating surfaces. It will never group again.
     
  20. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Boiled linseed and tung do have a beautiful look to them when done correctly and they have history behind them. But if you are doing a gun that is going to see weather etc they aren't the most protective finish.
    And I would second his finishing statement. Unless you plan on creating a problem to fix.