Visit from LEO

Discussion in 'North Carolina Gun Forum' started by levelcross, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    Working late last night at my shop to get a customers car fixed, I got a visit from the local LEO. He was just checking on my shop as he knew that the doors and lights are not usually open/on at this time of night. I offered him the .10 tour and a cup of coffee and thanked him several times for checking on my shop.

    It is nice to know that they are out there to look after us.
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Very nice. You didn't pee in the coffee ,did you?
     

  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    On of the old time basic tenets of community policing- know your community- know who is normally around, and what is normally around- and be aware when things are different.
     
  4. Bear304inc

    Bear304inc New Member

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    Good to hear the good for once, usually only hear about the bad encounters with leos. I've no doubt the good outweigh the bad just doesn't get posted nearly as much.
     
  5. PanBaccha

    PanBaccha New Member

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    It is anarchronistic almost to have a patrolman stop and check up on lights in shop unusually on at that time of night.
    Very surprise. Next time you see him sitting at a diner eating, quietly pay his bill, and exit. :)
     
  6. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    Yes it is rare to hear the good side of LEO, I think that is the main reason I posted this. I live in a small community so if I do see him out for dinner I will pick up his tab. I encourage them to stop by any time they are driving by.

    When I read about all of the armed robberies just a few miles away in another town, I feel it is just a matter of time until the scum finds its way to my area. Then I will be thankful for a good relationship with the LEO's.
     
  7. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    again we see the differences between the small towns and the big cities!

    NOT to say there arent bad apples in the small towns.

    Anywho, great to hear a positive tale!
     
  8. nukinfuts29

    nukinfuts29 New Member

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    Yep!! Don't see it much anymore. Well you do here, but our towns are so small the cops know people by smell.
     
  9. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    The cops in my home town often did door checks on the businesses to see if they were locked. Yes a couple times I got calls to come lock up:)
    But I just don't understand about excess gratitude for people that just do their jobs, whether it is a cop or waitress or store clerk or whatever? I say thanks but they are just doing the job they are paid for.
     
  10. nukinfuts29

    nukinfuts29 New Member

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    most people are not cops for the money. Besides they earn WAY more than their paychecks reflect and put up with a ton of crap. Expressing gratitude helps remind them why they do it. Everyone wants to feel appreciated sometimes, LE is no different.
     
  11. Bear304inc

    Bear304inc New Member

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    Maybe they shoulda just let you get taken for everything in the store, if it is your store you'd take a devastating loss, if not you may be out a job, lucky the le do check doors, which is not a requirement in most locals.
     
  12. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I used to live in a Northern California town that changed it's police dept. to "local policing.". Each neighborhood had a sub-station with the same officers and management. The first time I called to complain about a rental house that had an unusual amount of gang activity, the officer at the other end of the phone said, "You wouldn't want to leave your name or address or phone number, would you?" in a kind of sarcastic tone.

    "I'll leave my name, address, phone number and blood type if it'll get you to come out here!" I replied.

    His tone got extremely excited as he turned away from the receiver and said, "Lieutenant, we've got a live one!!!" Three seconds later, I was on the phone with the leader of the sub-station. He told me that they can't do much with anonymous tips because even if they arrest someone, the "tipster" never wants to be on the record because they are afraid of reprisals if their information is on court records. I sat there a little stunned and then said, "I'm not going to worry about people that wear pants ten sizes too big going to the courthouse and looking me up."

    Within a month, I had his direct line and cell phone. Together, within two years, we closed down the gang house, stopped a car theft ring and started the downfall of a local drug ring. I also stopped an officer and the city from a lawsuit by a gang member who claimed police brutality, all because I was willing to go on record and be involved.

    The point is that police officers are people, just like us, who are doing an impossible job. If we can help them, and our community, we can make things better and find some new friends, too!
     
  13. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    Hummm...when you go out to eat dinner do you tip the server according to the quality of service?? If you get your meal and a drink they have done the job they are paid for did they not? The cop was doing his job as well.

    I have a ton of money invested in my business. With that being said I would like to keep it and not give it away. If being overly thankful to the LEO for stopping by keeps him coming by to check on my place, well that is a win win for me. I might make a new friend and gain protection for my business at the same time.

    Now look at the wage that most LEO's make compared to yours, now look at the odds of you getting killed doing your job verses a LEO's odds. How does that look? I know that they chose LE as a profession, and hope that they understood the dangers involved, but the pay seems low to me just like the military pay verses the Congressional reward system.

    Sometimes a little gratitude goes a long way.
     
  14. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    "I say thanks"
    Yes I tip the server as that is part/most of their pay. In my post I said that I said thanks. Personally I had some friends who were cops and firemen. I just don't put them on a pedestal. If I have interaction with anyone who does more than their job I try to show my gratitude. But I stand by what I said above. If you are hired to do a job then do your job. I will thank you for doing your job (as even that is becoming rare) but but I am not going to gush over the fact that you are just doing what you are paid for.
     
  15. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Hiwall,

    This is not meant in any way to be derogatory towards you, just a comment on your post.

    While I agree that most jobs are thankless and people do not receive any recognition for doing their day-to-day jobs other than a paycheck, it is also true that most jobs do not require running into burning buildings, noxious gas clouds, drug dens and TOWARDS the sound of gunfire. Yes, they do know the risks and could choose not to, but because these foolish people choose to do it for us, we don't have to and are safer for it.

    The argument that tipping a waitress is a little apples/oranges: waitpeople have received tips for hundreds of years and are so part of our socioeconomic background that restaurant owners generally pay minimum wage to compensate for tips and therefore they are actually losing part of their expected income. The IRS even increases estimated income for waitpeople to tax them more for their unreported tips. This is one of the only systems in America where income is at least partially based on performance. Can you imagine if we did that with firefighters? "Oh, sorry, my house burned down because you were late, so you only get half your check this week.". Yeah, right! So the gratitude is for the fact that they are in deadly jobs so we are safer, and to me, there is nothing wrong with that. :)

    As an aside, my mother had a boss 50 years ago that never said one kind thing during the week, but when he handed out paychecks, he told each employee two words that reminded them of their place in the company, "We're Even." so given that or an occasional "Thank you," it benefits everyone more to be friendly.
     
  16. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I remember Dad getting that call once; glad i wasn't the last one out. :D
     
  17. Doc3402

    Doc3402 New Member

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    Kudos to the officer. He saw something, he knew that it didn't belong in the normal scheme of things, and he checked it out. Kudos to you for your hospitality and attitude. I would bet he appreciated it as much as you did.
     
  18. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    Doc, I think he did, he stopped by on his day off just to say Hi. We talked for a few and we walked out to the range behind my shop, he liked some of the more unusual targets I have, like the swinging 55gal. plastic drum and the car doors.
     
  19. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    I think it's important that we honor people for who they are and what they do, rather than just look at them as their paycheck is the thanks they are given. That just makes people numbers, and numbers are expendable. When society loses the ability to say thank you regardless of whether or not there is some other compensation involved, society breaks down.
     
  20. Bear304inc

    Bear304inc New Member

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    Very true,, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^