Vietnam Statistics

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by MobileMarine, Sep 24, 2011.

  1. MobileMarine

    MobileMarine New Member

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    I GOT THIS IN A EMAIL AND FIGURED ID POST IT FOR YOU GUYS



    Interesting Veterans Statistics of the Vietnam Memorial Wall

    "Carved on these walls is the story of America, of a continuing quest to preserve both Democracy and decency, and to protect a national treasure that we call the American dream." ~ President George Bush

    SOMETHING to think about - Most of the surviving Parents are now Deceased.

    There are 58,267 names now listed on that polished black wall, including those added in 2010.

    The names are arranged in the order in which they were taken from us by date and within each date the names are alphabetized. It is hard to believe it is 36 years since the last casualties.

    Beginning at the apex on panel 1E and going out to the end of the East wall, appearing to recede into the earth (numbered 70E - May 25, 1968), then resuming at the end of the West wall, as the wall emerges from the earth (numbered 70W - continuing May 25, 1968) and ending with a date in 1975. Thus the war's beginning and end meet. The war is complete, coming full circle, yet broken by the earth that bounds the angle's open side and contained within the earth itself.

    The first known casualty was Richard B. Fitzgibbon, of North Weymouth , Mass. Listed by the U.S. Department of Defense as having been killed on June 8, 1956. His name is listed on the Wall with that of his son, Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Richard B. Fitzgibbon III, who was killed on Sept. 7, 1965.

    · There are three sets of fathers and sons on the Wall.
    · 39,996 on the Wall were just 22 or younger.
    · 8,283 were just 19 years old.
    The largest age group, 33,103 were 18 years old.
    · 12 soldiers on the Wall were 17 years old.
    · 5 soldiers on the Wall were 16 years old.
    · One soldier, PFC Dan Bullock was 15 years old.
    · 997 soldiers were killed on their first day in Vietnam .
    · 1,448 soldiers were killed on their last day in Vietnam .
    · 31 sets of brothers are on the Wall.
    · Thirty one sets of parents lost two of their sons.
    · 54 soldiers on attended Thomas Edison High School in Philadelphia . I wonder why so many from one school.
    · 8 Women are on the Wall. Nursing the wounded.
    · 244 soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor during the Vietnam War; 153 of them are on the Wall.
    · Beallsville, Ohio with a population of 475 lost 6 of her sons.
    · West Virginia had the highest casualty rate per capita in the nation. There are 711 West Virginians on the Wall.
    · The Marines of Morenci - They led some of the scrappiest high school football and basketball teams that the little Arizona copper town of Morenci (pop. 5,058) had ever known and cheered. They enjoyed roaring beer busts. In quieter moments, they rode horses along the Coronado Trail, stalked deer in the Apache National Forest . And in the patriotic camaraderie typical of Morenci's mining families, the nine graduates of Morenci High enlisted as a group in the Marine Corps. Their service began on Independence Day, 1966. Only 3 returned home.
    · The Buddies of Midvale - LeRoy Tafoya, Jimmy Martinez, Tom Gonzales were all boyhood friends and lived on three consecutive streets in Midvale, Utah on Fifth, Sixth and Seventh avenues. They lived only a few yards apart. They played ball at the adjacent sandlot ball field. And they all went to Vietnam . In a span of 16 dark days in late 1967, all three would be killed. LeRoy was killed on Wednesday, Nov. 22, the fourth anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Jimmy died less than 24 hours later on Thanksgiving Day. Tom was shot dead assaulting the enemy on Dec. 7, Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.
    · The most casualty deaths for a single day was on January 31, 1968 ~ 245 deaths.
    · The most casualty deaths for a single month was May 1968 - 2,415 casualties were incurred.

    For most Americans who read this they will only see the numbers that the Vietnam War created. To those of us who survived the war, and to the families of those who did not, we see the faces, we feel the pain that these numbers created. We are, until we too pass away, haunted with these numbers, because they were our friends, fathers, husbands, wives, sons and daughters. There are no noble wars, just noble warriors.




    When people fear their government, there is tyranny, when the government fears the people, there is Liberty.
    And, No free man shall ever be deprived the use of arms.
    ---Thomas Jefferson

    May God bless us all.
     
  2. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Amen. While I was reading that, the only thing I could think of was the men I know who's last trip home was made in a wooden box.
     

  3. MobileMarine

    MobileMarine New Member

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    Different war but great grandpa george and uncle curly were on the beach during d-day , curly was shot dead and g-dad was also shot but severly wounded . He was thrown in the pile with the dead but luckily he came to as someone was passing by . I have never seen arlington or any of it but the next trip up Its on the agenda . Im only 28 but I dont really understand what Nam was about ? It seems the nam vets dont get the respect as the ww2 guys do/did , what gives ?
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    If you make it to DC, Arlington is just across the river, and worth the visit. But also budget some time for the Vietnam, the Korean, and WW 2 memorials. They are all in walking distance of the Lincoln Memorial.

    Ref: Vets- we never lost a battle. We were whipped in the news media by liberals. We were whipped in the field by the orders from own own chain of command- including LBJ and McNamara. We were whipped by a public that was convinced that we were baby killing nun raping drug addicts. It still goes on.

    A few years back there was a "public figure" that was in front of a camera at every opportunity, telling about his hard times in Nam, and touting the unemployed homeless mentally deranged drug abusing Nam vet. It finally came out that the SOB had never been West of Oakland CA.

    Then we have a young John Kerry, spouting off to the media about the murder of civilians in Nam. Much of Kerry's speech before Congress painted his fellow GIs as so brutal that, today, they could easily be mistaken for Saddam Hussein's Fedayeen killers.

    kerry_sfr.jpg

    He told Congress that U.S. soldiers had "personally raped, cut off ears, cut off heads, taped wires from portable telephones to human genitals and turned up the power, cut off limbs, blown up bodies, randomly shot at civilians, razed villages, shot cattle and dogs for fun, poisoned food stocks, and generally ravaged the countryside of South Vietnam."

    Kerry was a supporter of the "People's Peace Treaty," a supposed "people's" declaration to end the war, reportedly drawn up in communist East Germany.
    It included nine points, all of which were taken from Viet Cong peace proposals at the Paris peace talks as conditions for ending the war. One of the provisions stated: "The Vietnamese pledge that as soon as the U.S. government publicly sets a date for total withdrawal [from Vietnam], they will enter discussion to secure the release of all American prisoners, including pilots captured while bombing North Vietnam."

    Several weeks later, Kerry was featured in a on CBS's "60 Minutes." Correspondent Morley Safer, in the segment portrayed Kerry as an eloquent man who had a "Kennedyesque" future. "Do you want to be president of the United States?" Safer asked Kerry.

    "No," Kerry replied. "That's such a crazy question when there are so many things to be done and I don't know whether I could do them."



    I stay in touch with my classmates from OCS. Most retired as LTC's, but a couple made General. They are now senior managers, professors, senior LEOs, etc.

    Here is one of my late classmates, who was one of 100 people ever inducted into the US Army Ranger Hall of Fame. Read it, and see what you think of him. US Mountain Ranger Association
     
  5. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    It's a lot different now. When I ended my career in 1970 as a C.U.N.T. (Civilian Under Naval Training) and while returning home in uniform, I got spit on!

    It was a welcome many of us old farts got back then!

    I don't hold a grudge but I still have a good memory!
     

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  6. MobileMarine

    MobileMarine New Member

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    So basically nothing has changed much ? Oh but nowthe troops can now proudly wave their rainbow flag with the american flag .
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I don't know about the other more recent vets but I was spit on and jumped by 3 guys who managed to pick me out by my haircut (not a hard thing to do). One said, "Hey cool hair cut, you a Marine?" of course I said yeah and it was on right away.
     
  8. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I believe that one of the greatest trageties in American history occured when Americans yelled, called baby killers, and disrespected true American heros coming home from a hell that cannot be imagined unless you were there. They fought and many of them died for their country and that is the welcome they get. Those protestors make me sick and do not deserve the freedom that these men fought to protect.
     
  9. Sniper75

    Sniper75 New Member

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    It was that generation that everything changed especially the public. Before vietnam Americans would never disrespect troops coming home from a war. Today people get court orders to protest their funerals. It's a disgrace. It's sickening. Someone dies and they want to say, "Good. I am glad they did" that's a horrible thought. And it's those people that are from that generation that have that way of thinking. And they are teaching it to the younger people of today. I am 20 years old. I am in the Marine Corps my father is a retired combat vet my uncle is currently still in as a MSgt and my other uncle served 6 during the Gulf. My grandfather is a vietnam vet. He was a Green Beret that served with the 5th. He has a purple heart, 2 silver stars and 1 bronze star. So this issue hits close to home for me.
     
  10. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    The Unforgiven......

    It was a war that the Aussie's, the French and the the Americans all got there *** kicked because Some arse holes were worried about collateral damage..... We had the Basterds by the gonads but some Idiot in the peace talks gave them the war...... Guess who......:mad:
     
  11. PanBaccha

    PanBaccha New Member

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    Thank you MobileMarine for your posting.
    Really appreciate it. Most of us do not like
    talking about, much less remembering, the
    Vietnam War. Your posting brought me back.
    Lost alot of friends there. I am 64 yrs old and thankful ...
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2011
  12. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    It had nothing to due w/ one person. It was a proxy war. Just like Korea. The big boys needed a place to prove a point. This time politics won over the worth of our boys. Funny, The Vietnamese still love the U.S. and have a free enterprise system. In the 1950's Ho Chi Mihn asked the U.S. for help in getting rid of the French, we declined. The Soviets and Chinese did not. So Why were we there???
     
  13. MobileMarine

    MobileMarine New Member

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    Not tooting my own horn but I had a old fat man call me to pick up his pontoon for service and repair . I repaired his boat and brought it back , put it back in the water ect ect . I think the bill was around 300.00 but when we went inside for him to stroke a check I got to looking at this display case , low and behold i see this medal with purple ribbon . I stood back and asked him if that was what I thought it was and he proceeded to tell me how he got it . I gave him a thank you and hand shake and secretly left his check there . He later called me to tell me I had left the check and thats when I told him his money was no good to me , and refused to give him a mailing address . Alot of folks dont expect free work but I have done it many times for people who... say , The husband is overseas and the wife has to get the boat winterized , I give them a quote and when Im done and they go get the check I just leave before they can get back outside . My way of saying thank you . I cant imagine how hard it is for families to be split up while serving .
     
  14. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

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    So many good friends lost in that damn war. It took a long time for me to find the strength to go and visit them at the Wall. I'm glad I did now. Having been there late in the war during '72 and '73, they're all just above eye level to the left of the apex. I go and visit them as often as I can now.
     
  15. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Wow, that is really nice. I'm sure they really appreciate your thank you.
     
  16. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    What they did to our troops was horrible. I'm glad that my Grandpa didn't have to deal with that when he came home from Korea. Back then, people loved the country.
     
  17. Marlinman

    Marlinman New Member

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    Having been jumped at the air port in kc mo I understand the feeling. All bc I just came back from iraq and was in my dress blues and dang proud to be one of the few and proud. I seen several friends pay for the whole "they are just hungry, innocent civilian children" BULL#@+%
     
  18. ruggerio

    ruggerio New Member

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    im in philly and have been my entire life more or less. that is an interesting number for edison high school. my take on it is that it was, as it is now in a very depressed part of the city and although it was primarily black and hispanic i know of many white students who attended edison .

    i believe most of the students at edison were sent to the school for disciplinary issues and it could lead one to conclude that those same individuals who had a problem obeying the rules in school had the same problem with the law outside of school.

    we all have heard the stories of options during war time for offenders, jail or combat.

    many of the guys( older then me but close enough that i knew many of them ) from my small part of the city who attended edison served in viet-nam i personally know of a group of good friends who all went together who also attended edison together, some of whom returned highly decorated.

    rip and god bless them all. im 45 and have never experienced a more moving memorial in my life.
     
  19. steve666

    steve666 New Member

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    I want to say thank you for the original post, and the many supporting posts. It brought tears to my eyes to remember the friends and comrades whose names appear on that wall. I am thankful to have made it home, and have gotten past the "welcome" that we received. I am saddened to say that so many in our society only remember those who have sacrificed, especially those who made the ultimate sacrifice, when reminded.
     
  20. MobileMarine

    MobileMarine New Member

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    A previous reply stirred my emotions on the funeral protest . The good Lord says not to hate and it is very hard not to do with those people . I just think what if someone had protested at my mothers funeral ? I would prob be in jail right now , hell I like to think if I saw them doing that that my truck would loose control and run them over . I put them in the same catagorey as the child rapist , muggers , lawyers , used car salesmen ect , just the scum of the earth . I hope they are protested when they die . What makes even worse is they are claiming Gods works ! All I can say is that they will be judged for their actions as will the rest of us . Words can not describe how I feel about those people .
    We own a tire and towing company and are close friends to many high up political folks and many many in law enforcement , all which showed up at my mothers funeral . Well some little punk kept riding his atv by the front of the church during the ceremony ,this naturally upset the leo's that were there . They later caught him and '' luck '' had US impound it . Needless to say he got it back but it will NEVER EVER run again . He buzzed the wrong people