VIDEO: Finest Bolt Action Battle Rifle in History?

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Amsdorf, Sep 12, 2012.

  1. Amsdorf

    Amsdorf New Member

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    The Lee-Enfield, a remarkable battle rifle with one of the longest service histories in the world, even today being used on active duty. The bolt operation is so fast that during World War I there were times when the Germans thought they were under attack by British machine guns, no bolt action rifle was able to be fired as quickly and with as much accuracy at high speed than the Lee-Enfield.

    Do you own one? Would love to hear from others about their Lee-Enfields. Here is mine with a bit of background on the rifle's history:


    LINK TO VIDEO HERE.
     
  2. marc29th

    marc29th New Member

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    I have 2, a 1912 No. 1 MK 3 made at Enfield Arsenal and a 1942 No. 4 MK 1* made at Long Branch Arsenal in Canada. Got to love the SMLE!
     

  3. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I have owned them in the past. Great rifles. Fast action, high capacity for a bolt action battle rifle, accurate, and powerful.

    I've heard it said, that "The Germans made a great hunting rifle that worked well in combat in the Mauser '98. The Americans stole the Mauser '98 and made it into a great target rifle in the 1903 Springfield. But the British made a great battle rifle in the SMLE."
     
  4. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The British Enfield. Hands down .
     
  5. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    The Remington 700 was an important sniper rifle because of it's fast action and accuracy. They were modified, however. Carlos Hathcock approved.
     
  6. ineverFTF

    ineverFTF New Member

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    I am going foriegn. Now i make no claims to it being the greatest.
    But the japenese arisaka has one of the strongest chambers ever.
    Even the crappy end of the war mash ups, were stronger than our enfields ever were.
    I wont say they are more accurate, or more reliable. But they are hands down stronger.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2012
  7. potentialglock

    potentialglock New Member

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    Part of the reason the enfields were so devastating were the hands they were placed in. British troops trained to do a mad minute and the average troop could put anywhere from 20-40 rounds downrange in a minute. Imagine sitting in a trench while 50 soldiers are doing a mad minute. Is think there was a machine gun too!
     
  8. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    The Remington 700 wasn't a "Battle rifle" in general issue, designed to deliver volley fire on area targets. The M40 and M24 were built on Remington 700 actions, but to military specifications for sniper use.

    I was also under the impression that Gunny used a modified Winchester model 70 for most of his exploits in Viet Nam before the Sniper units became more widespread and equipment got standardized. (I could be wrong though). The Winchesters were in early Marine inventory for match shooting and were presed into service in Viet Nam, chambered in .30-06. Nice thing about the Winchesters is that they used controled round feeding like the Mauser (basically a Mauser copy.)
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2012
  9. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Uh...Enfields are foreign. They are British.

    The Arisaka was basically another copy of the Mauser 98. except with a harder to use safety. Though some of the early ones have buttery smooth actions.
     
  10. ineverFTF

    ineverFTF New Member

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    My bad. I meant ours as in "allies" i knew it was british.
    How was the safety harder to use? Stiffer, or poor design?
     
  11. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    Ya got me!
    Hathcock generally used the standard sniper rifle: the Winchester Model 70 .30-06 caliber rifle with the standard 8-power Unertl scope. On some occasions, however, he used a different weapon: the M2 Browning machine gun, on which he mounted a 10X Unertl scope, using a bracket of his own design.[4] Hathcock made a number of kills with this weapon in excess of 1,000 yards, including his record for the longest confirmed kill at 2,500 yards.[4][25] Hathcock carried a Colt M1911A1 pistol as a sidearm.[9]
     
  12. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    Sounds like my two, except my No.1 is 1943 and my No.4 is 1944. They are great guns and still my go to deer rifle. :)
     
  13. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Why does everybody hate Arisaka safeties? Mines easier to use than on my Mosin and 1903, I think the Arisaka has one of the easiest safeties to operate... Just a twist with your palm or thumb... :confused:

    The Arisaka also cocks on closing...
     
  14. ChicagoJoe

    ChicagoJoe New Member

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    I have a 1943 No 4 that I have used for deer hunting with just the iron sights. It is accurate and the action is buttery smooth. I like to think that it was used to kill NAZIs in North Africa and deer in Pennsylvania. Pic is attached.
     

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  15. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Kind of hard to operate and verify visually the fact that it is engaged or off when compared to the flag type safety of the '98.

    Arisaka rifles are high quality guns, but iI would still look to the 98 Mauser as one fo the most influential bolt action rifles ever made. It was copied in many military and sporting bolt action guns in some way, shape or form more than any other. To include the Springfield 1903, the Arisaka, the Winchester model 70, the Remington 700 etc. Sual front locking lugs, a third safety lug, gas shield, gas venting (in the event of a pierced primer), controled round feeding, the stagered internal box magazine, etc.

    And I wasn't trying to be a jerk if my reply came off that way, it was just meant to be a clarification of facts.
     
  16. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. It's been a while since I had read up on him. I thought I might have been remembering wrong.

    Yes, the recounting of his shooting the gun laden bicycle with the Browning M2 was one of my favorites. It was the longest recorded shot up to that time. I think a Canadian now has the record.
     
  17. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Mostly correct. However the Pattern 14 (P14) Enfields were mostly manufactured for the British in the U.S.

    when we got into WW one, we converted these facilities to manufacture the Pattern 17 (P17) Enfields in .30-06.

    Most of our troops, including Sgt Alvin York, were armed with the P17 because we were already tooled up to mass produce the P14 and this was a minor changeover for the factories to produce the P17.

    Springfield Armory was the only manufacturer of the 1903 at the time, (IIRC) and they couldn't produce enough of them fast enough to arm the troops. By the time other facilities came on line to produce the 1903, the war was over.
     
  18. potentialglock

    potentialglock New Member

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    Yes a Canadian sniper using American ammunition holds the records for longest kill. During their mission the Canadians ran out of their own ammo and were able to acquire ammo from American allies.
     
  19. me762

    me762 New Member

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    This is my SMLE it has. Rebarreled for 243 win and I also milled the stripper Clio guide of and made a scope mount out of angle iron. Who say rear locking lugs are in accruate?

    Before all you history buffs get bent out of shape listen to this. The stock was smashed and barrel bent 90° (wasn't mine at the time so don't ask). This weapon is one of the most accurate I own and has a fast action and a 10rd mag. Talk about a varmint rig that can also take deer or the two legged varmints if need be

    ForumRunner_20120914_214252.jpg



    ForumRunner_20120914_214252.jpg
     

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  20. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    What about a K31?? The straight-bolt has to be quicker than a turn-bolt..