Velocity spreads?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Coyotenator, Sep 29, 2012.

  1. Coyotenator

    Coyotenator New Member

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    I am doing load up for my REM 700VS in .243 Win. trying to wring the last bit of accuracy out of it.

    I have been able to get my velocity spreads inside of 1 percent(25 to 32 fps and an average of 3580 fps) and have a load that will pattern 5 shots at.429" at 100 yds., but I wonder if I can improve that if I can cut the spread?The pattern is mostly vertical.

    I was wondering what kind of velocity spreads you precision reloaders can hold a load to, what you do to get them that I might be missing, or if this is about as good as it gets or needs to be?

    Here are the steps I am taking.
    I am weighing and sorting cases fired in my rifle,neck sizing with a collet die,checking neck thickness and concentricity,uniforming primer pockets and flash holes,using match primers,weighing the charges to the best of my ability, and holding loaded length to the closest tolerances.This is a non-compressed load of 41.7 grns. of Varget with a 75 grn. Hornady V-MAX.and a COAL of 2.612".This is .005" off the rifling and seems to be where the sweet spot is.
     
  2. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    That is not a custom barreled target rifle. It looks like to me you are getting close to custom rifle results. I think you are doing damn good.:)
     

  3. stephencollins

    stephencollins New Member

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    I'm loading .222 with 21.5 RL-7 (a bit over max but no pressure signs), 50gr speer tnt, and doing all the stuff you are. I'm getting a spread of about 25 fps with an average of 3270 fps. Sounds like you're doing everything right. The only way to improve now is to try different charges or even powder to see if the rifle prefers it a bit faster/slower but I'm more than happy with what I've got and will stick with it.
     
  4. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    I used to be real anal about my reloading process too,but have found over the years,unless your shooting for competition none of all the weighing/sorting really matters that much shooting a bullet that's designed for hunting.
    Today,the only thing I sort is the headstamps on the brass.I trim all the brass to the same length,use standard primers-unless the load calls for Magnum primers.I clean the primer pockets,but don't waste time uniforming them.
    I use a RCBS Uniflow/Redding BR-3/Smart Reloader electric powder dispensers for all my powder charging,and most of my loads vary 50fps or less velocity speeds between rounds.
    Almost all of my rifles will shoot under .500" groups,with several shooting .250" and under when I'm on my game.

    You just have to find the right bullet/powder combination for each rifle,and fine tune the load.You really don't have to do all of the extra things the Benchrest guy's do.Those guy's can be a little "Nutty"!
     
  5. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Your gun is not shooting "spreads", it is shooting very respectable GROUPS. Sub half inch in the .243 is pretty damn good. Don't sweat it.
     
  6. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Robo, I say this very gently. His spread is in velocity, his is incorrect in stating he shoots patterns, those are the groups.

    OP Shotguns pattern, rifles shoot groups. Are you shooting 3 or 5 round strings? For the average shooter, you're not doing badly. Sometimes you find a powder that just works w/ a specific bullet because of the weight and design.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2012
  7. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    32 FPS velocity spread is outstanding. I would consider that load a "keeper."
     
  8. Coyotenator

    Coyotenator New Member

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    Thanks for all the feedback.

    This is the first time I have done load-up when I had a chrono of my own and I wasn't sure if 1 percent spread was good enough, or whether there was still something that I could do to tighten that up and shrink the group.I feel pretty good with what I have , but always want more if I can get it.

    If the bloody wind will ever give me a window of opportunity, I will see how it shoots at 250 yards as that is where I want it zeroed.
     
  9. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    Weigh each bullet (projectile) and load them in batches according to weight.

    I checked the last batch of 168gr SMKs, and found them to be +-1.5gr from 168.
     
  10. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That's less than one percent. I no longer bother weighing or sorting Sierra Match Kings. (I weighed several hundred of them over the years, and concluded that the quality was so high, I was wasting my time)
     
  11. Coyotenator

    Coyotenator New Member

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    I checked the first box (I bought 500 at the start of load-up, all the same lot#)of the 75 grn V-MAX bullets I am using and found them to be within 1/10 grn + or -, and I weighed a couple randomly out of the 2nd box with the same results.
     
  12. sniper762

    sniper762 New Member

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    i shoot a custom built .308 similar to my g.i. m24. i shoot g.i. lake city m852. ten of them chronoed with a max of 25fps spread. i cannot reload to match that.
     
  13. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    You asked how to squeeze a little more, and I told you.
     
  14. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There's one little caveat here that no one's mentioned.

    The loading with the lowest spread is usually the most accurate, but not always. Otherwise, it wouldn't be necessary to shoot groups, just chronograph them.


    After getting my first chronograh, an old Oehler model 10, back in the mid 70s, I chronographed my most accurate 6MM and .30-06 loads. Lo and behold, the .30-06 loads that grouped into 1/2 inch, had a spread of +or- 75 FPS. The 6MM load went less than 40 FPS.

    My old Lyman manual ponts out that their "accuracy" load was the one with the lowest spread, and would not necseeatily be the most accurate.
     
  15. Coyotenator

    Coyotenator New Member

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    Thats a very good point. I noticed myself that some of the loads having good spreads didn't shoot that well, and vice-versa.


    I think that if the wind will ever die down enough to test, that this load should shoot into less than 2" at 250 yds., and if it does I will probably call it good.
     
  16. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    How long are you waiting between shots? Is it long enough to let the barrel cool completely?
     
  17. Coyotenator

    Coyotenator New Member

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    Well for the first time in days it was dead calm this morning, so I went out to the range to test this load at 250 yds, and am really pleased with the results.

    I had hoped that it would shoot into 2", but it grouped 7 shots into 1.415" CTC instead!!!I think I'll call this load "better than" good and stop messing with it.

    Now I can concentrate on cutting down the yote population before it get's really cold, and they start getting hungry enough to cause me problems.






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  18. Coyotenator

    Coyotenator New Member

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    I fired a fouling shot and then spaced out the 7 "for record" shots so that the barrel never gets more than warm to the touch.This took about 30 min. this morning as it was only 48 degrees.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2012
  19. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you want to see some interesting results, try this:

    Fire one shot from a cold barrel. wait for a full five minutes.
    Then fire four more as fast as you can get a good sight picture and squeeze the trigger. Save that target.

    Now, from your fouled barrel, fire five shots from a cold barrel, allowing the full five minutes for cooling between every shot.

    Compare the targets.:eek::eek:

    Another interesting drill:

    Fire five three shot groups from a clean barrel. Average the group size..

    Clean the bore, and three ten shot groups. Average them and compare.

    In all likelihood, you'll find that three shots groups really don't tell you very much.

    Having said that, three shot groups are fine for hunting loads.