Used .22 and Side by Side Shotgun for my son...

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by TenSpeed, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. TenSpeed

    TenSpeed New Member

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    I've always supported the Second Amendment, I’ve just never had anyone to go to a range with to fire off rounds. I worked at a riffle range after high school and before I went into the military. My son is ten, and his mother and I are not together. I've never wanted to have the discussion with his mother about buying him his own .22 and the possible legal battle that may have ensued, I have joint custody. A couple of weeks ago, his mother gave me the green light to buy him a .22 riffle and a side by side shotgun. Her and her fiancee are buying themselves, his step sister, and him Genesis bows for Christmas this year and she's even discussed taking him hunting when he gets a little older. His birthday is in December.
    Earlier this year, I bought him a Crossman air soft riffle and hand gun combo package. Both guns are spring fired and shoot at 220 FPS. I talked to him about gun safety and how they could in theory severely injure or kill himself or someone else. I did in fact threaten to take them away and bust his rear end if he screwed up with the gun safety. He's really impressed me with the way he's handled them. At the time I purchased them for him, he had almost talked me into buying him a Daisy Powerline BB Gun. I told him then, if he proved to me he could handle the air soft guns responsibly I would buy the BB gun for him, later in the year. At this point, I see no reason to waste money on a BB gun for him.
    He knows he's getting a .22 and a double barrel shotgun for his birthday. We sat down and discussed it, he doesn't want a new .22 or a double barrel shotgun. We both feel they wouldn't have their own character or history if they were new.
    From researching .22 riffles for children, what I've decided is a .22 that is bolt action. I would like a bolt action .22 that accepts clips, but has the ability to be loaded without the clip, is capable of having the round removed without it needing to be fired. I want to start him off with iron sights, fiber optic, and then to a scope. In order for him to get one more round, he has to be able to consistently put the round(s) he has through the center of the target or the same hole on the target. Preferably the riffle should be between 50 to a hundred years old. My question is, what riffles are out there presently that are like this? Or better yet, how can I go about finding this information out myself?
    As far as the shotgun goes, what gauge should I look for for him? I would like a shotgun that would allow us to shoot at clay pigeons as well as be able to hunt duck, pheasant, quail, and turkey if we choose to later on. What models should I be looking at for both him and myself? We found a 20 gauge at Cabelas the other day for fifteen hundred, which was about 70 years old and I know he really liked it. I don't have a problem spending that type of money as long as I know it'll bring him years of enjoyment.
    I'm sure in another posting this has all been posted, I tried searching but I didn’t find much. Thank you for your help in advance.
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    I love that you are getting your child into the sport and supporting the second amendment. I applaud how you've handled things so far but IMHO you are asking too much of the child and the gun. I know guys that have been shooting for 20 years and can't put 2 rounds through the same hole at 50 yards. I would suggest you easy up on him a little. Focus on trigger control and safety and maintenance before you focus on a single ragged hole. Not that that isn't a great goal to have, its just a bit early to aim for.
    The likelihood of finding a 70+ year old .22 with fiber optic sights is a bit slim, so if your dead set on that expect to have to put extra money into it. The bolt action is a great idea and I'm sure one of the guys on here will know the perfect model.
    You might want to rethink the double barrel also. It might be a bit much for the youngster to start with and not the best option for an all around shotgun. The gauge I'll leave to your discretion. A single shot h&r or a pump action might be a better idea.
    Once you've narrowed down your options and you hit the range focus on the basics and make sure you have fun. Cherish the time with your kid and create good memories.
     

  3. ineverFTF

    ineverFTF New Member

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    I agree with mm13.
    It is wonderful that you are getting your son into shooting, but take it slow.
    A 22 bolt with a MAGAZINE is a great idea for a first gun. As mm13 said if you want an old one with good irons you will be putting some money into it.
    As to the double barrel gun, even if it's a 410 bore, the gun will be almost twice the weight as a standard 870 or mossy 500. My first shotgun was a little rosi single shot 20. The thing kicks like a mule, but it was the gun i got my first dove with. A double will be to heavy for the average kid to swing or even hold to shoot accurately. for a shotgun i always recommend the remington 870. It is inexpensive and quality. Buy a youth model in 20ga and he will use the gun for years.
    Whatever you decide, focus on safety, and enjoy time with your son.
     
  4. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    tenspeed How old is your son and how big.

    If you want a 22 rifle that has history why not also buy the best-Anshultz- You can buy old or new but in a model that has the history behind it and be of the quality to last several generations.
    http://www.championshooters.com/Anschutz-sp.ht
    OR
    http://www.mtguns.com/

    I understand you wanting a old classic also for a shot gun but how a bout a adjustable stocked Benneli in a 28ga that should also do all thats needed right now and will make a very skilled shooter out of your son and light enought to handel easily. and enjoy for many years makes for a sgoos sporting clay fun. http://www.benelliusa.com/shotguns/benelli-ultra-light.php

    Or the montefeltro combo that offers both a standard stock and a short stock
    http://www.benelliusa.com/shotguns/benelli-montefeltro.php

    I realise these benelli's are not old classics but they do offer a true adjustable stock fit and possibly no hacking of a stock well be needed. No use buying a classic shot gun if it does not fit and that really is a most for skeet and trap.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2012
  5. Blueguns

    Blueguns New Member

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    Maybe an old winchester bolt?
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2012
  6. TenSpeed

    TenSpeed New Member

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    I didn't think it was too early of a goal for him to aim for. I just assumed that with good trigger control, safety, and maintenance, it would happen naturally over time with practice.

    Finacially, I'm not really concerned about what I'll spend. I didn't expect to come into this and only put down a few hundred dollars. I know what I can budget and plan for over a year or two period of time. To me I'm not investing in a riffle for my son. I'm making an investment in him and his future. As parents can we put a dollar amount on our children? It's a lot easier to do something right the first time than it is to have to go back and redo it 2 or 3 times.
     
  7. TenSpeed

    TenSpeed New Member

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    My son is about 5 foot and he weighs about 100 lbs. He does play football, baseball, and is involved in Scouts. When he shoots a bow with his mother, he uses either a 35lb recurve or a 30lb compound. He enjoys shooting the recurve more because it's more of a challenge for him. He's far more accurate with the compound though.

    These are things that I never thought or knew about. I will look at the riffles and shotguns at the links you posted. One thing I don't fully understand, is how do you know what gauge to buy for a child?
     
  8. TenSpeed

    TenSpeed New Member

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    I defiantly want to get us one of these. I saw an old pump action one at a store the other day. I think it would be awesome for popping rounds off at the old plinket pond. For a long, long time, I never understood why people owned a lot of riffles. While looking for this for him, I've figured it out. It may have no other use, than as a plinket riffle.
     
  9. TenSpeed

    TenSpeed New Member

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    Thank you all for sharing your knowledge with me on the things I need to know so my son and I an enjoyable time learning. As my mom use to say, “They're only little once, enjoy it while you can.”
     
  10. Blueguns

    Blueguns New Member

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    I have a model 61 from 1943 it's been in the family for a while. They're a little pricey, but if you can afford one they're definitely worth it.
     
  11. Blueguns

    Blueguns New Member

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    Maybe for the shotgun an old Ithaca o/u double barrel featherweight in 20 ga.

    EDIT: These may be hard to find, but one will pop up on gunbroker or gunsamerica from time to time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2012
  12. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    Most kids beat the crap out of a gun. I would look for durability. Anything modern is going to be fairly accurate. For a moment be honest with your self. If you are in an internet forum seeking advice do you think you have the knowledge required to buy a classic weapon? People who have been shooting all their lives, even gunsmiths occasionally buy a broken gun. They leave their bore light at home or overlook a tiny crack in the receiver. Virtually all used gun sales are final. It's not like buying a car, there are no lemon laws to protect you. It's buyer beware!
     
  13. TenSpeed

    TenSpeed New Member

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    We've had this discussion. I'm buying him the .22 for his birthday and he has to buy the shotgun himself and I'll match him, with him paying me back over time. I allow him to tell me no when I ask him or tell him to do something. Ninety percent of the time, he does it, five percent of the time, he has a reason for why he tells me no and it's legitimate. The other five percent of the time, he's just being lazy. There are consequences for all of our choices and he knows this. Don't want to pick up your room or do your choirs? That's fine, no TV, no video games, no toys. As with all of his things, I buy quality, because I want them to last. I would be upset with him if he didn't get a few dings and dents on his shotgun. It's made to bring you enjoyment, and as such it's going to get wear and tear. I can accept that, abuse on the other hand is unacceptable, even adults drop them from time to time. It's also one more thing for him to learn responsibility and consequences with. Didn't clean it? Fine you don't get to use it and we aren't going shooting today. Pointed it in the wrong direction? Now you've lost it and will not get it back until you re-earn my trust with it.
    As far as purchasing one, as with anything else, do not purchase it from someone you feel is shady. I would imagine, even a private seller, would be willing to let the riffle or shotgun go to an agreed upon credible gun smith to be inspected before the sale, at my cost. If you aren't willing to do so, chances are I'm not willing to do business with you. I do realize this is not always feasible and as you said I may end up purchasing a broken gun. At the very least, I would hope that a reputable gun dealer would be blunt and honest up front, I/we haven't had a chance to inspect this, there may be damage to it or I/we have tested and to the best of our knowledge there is nothing wrong with it/ We've inspected and tested it and these are the things we've found that need work on this. This is life, nothing is promised or guaranteed.

    Old_Crow, I do appreciate your advice and concern. I know I do not have the ability to do what you said. It'll take years for me to learn. It's our right to own and bear arms, as guaranteed by the Second Amendment. It's the responsibility of each generation to pass down the knowledge to those who come after us, so that they have the knowledge and can enjoy it. If we know of shady dealers, I do believe we have a responsibility to warn others about them.
     
  14. TenSpeed

    TenSpeed New Member

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    We saw one of these the other day, while we were looking at .22s. I wish I had, had my FOID card and some money to put down on it. Out of all of the guns they had in the display cases, he gravitated towards that one, like a moth to a light. If I could have, I would have bought it right there and then.
     
  15. Blueguns

    Blueguns New Member

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    If you have the chance to get it, it's a pretty awesome gun. I would highly recommend it. Mine has not had a problem ever, and it's about 40 years old.
     
  16. Buckeyeborn

    Buckeyeborn New Member

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    I love these not bolt or clip feed but love them I do
    3732 Winchester Model 62 A 22 cal s l lr 1940 Special order? GI#: 100270530
    3732 Wichester Model 62 A 22 cal s l lr mfg 12/28/1940, "W" on bottom of receiver by s/n 11502x,"to test quality of bluing or special rifle"page 153 of Schwing book.97 % condition, ...Click for more info
    Seller: dawsonsdoubles Area Code: 210 $1,295.00
     
  17. stoppingpower

    stoppingpower New Member

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    Magazine not clip bro
     
  18. USEBOTHHANDS

    USEBOTHHANDS New Member

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    how about buying him a new bolt-action .22 rifle? it might not have the "pre-" history, but it's the history that the two of you create (around it) that will be remembered most. trust me.........i have a .22 magnum Marlin Model 25 MN that my dad gave to me. cheap lil rifle, but i cherish it because he bought it for me. i shot the hell outta that thing when i first got it, over 20 years ago. now, i shoot it from time to time, and boy does it remind me of when he and i used to hunt.

    as for the shotty, a 20 gauge crack-barrel (single-shot) would be perfect for him @ this stage. when he gets a lil bit older, say 15 or 16, then you can buy him a 20 or 12 gauge semi-auto, or pump (typically a 5 round, tubular magazine, with removable plug to hold a legal 3 rounds). the reason i suggest a single shot, shotgun is because of the weight. givin a child a firearm that is too heavy, and/or too long can cause fatigue quite quickly........leadin to burnout.......leadin to misses......ultimately leadin to a shaky confidence level........then, maybe, leadin to a youngster that doesn't want to shoot anymore because he/she can't hit anything.

    whatever you buy, keep it light, manageable, and as closely "fitted" to your son's length of pull as possible.

    you two create tons of memories, and happy huntin. :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2012
  19. moron88

    moron88 New Member

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    for what gauge, i started with 20 gauge at 17 (found the gun in the closet). realistically, all the gauges are similar. you can buy really light loads that barely have any recoil and then you could get triple ought buck. 12 gauge has more variety of factory loads, but 20 requires more skill to hit what you're aiming at. some skeet/trap shooters switch from 12 to 20, then to .410 just for the added challenge.

    for a .22, the marlin 39 is thought by some to be the most accurate .22 ever produced. it's a lever action and tube fed, but it'll hold 19 round of .22lr and can also cycle shorts and longs. not having a detachable mag has the advantage of not being able to lose it. and lever actions are just so fun to shoot:D