US Springfield model 1903 30-06

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by Ridgerunnerras, Mar 9, 2009.

  1. Ridgerunnerras

    Ridgerunnerras New Member

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    This is not a modification project just to Show something neat I have. I may refinish or leave it alone as is. I got this from my Grandfather before he died. He bought it I think in the 30's new as surplus. Still shoots great.

    It has a Star gauge barrel and the bolt has the serial number engraved in it that match's the gun. He used to compete with it.

    Not that I would ever sell it but I have seen prices all over the range. Any body know about what it is worth?

    I will take some more pics but here is the one I have
    [​IMG]
     
  2. notdku

    notdku Administrator Staff Member

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    Classic. Still groups well after 70+ years?
     

  3. matt g

    matt g New Member Supporter

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    Nothing looks the quite same as the patina of an old, well loved rifle stock.

    I wouldn't even worry about the value of it. I would however do whatever was required to ensure that my grandchildren were proud to own a rifle that was first purchased by their grandfather's grandfather.
     
  4. Ridgerunnerras

    Ridgerunnerras New Member

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    yes it does :)
     
  5. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I know that a Star gauge barrel is a fine barrel. Other than that, the fact that it's been sporterized detracts greatly from its numerical value. I've seen prices average from $500. to around $700. for them in that condition.

    What you really have is a legacy from your Grandfather and a piece of family history. Value it and treat it well. In my humble opinion, don't refinish or alter it in any way. Clean it, lubricate it and by all means, shoot it.

    CA357
     
  6. Ridgerunnerras

    Ridgerunnerras New Member

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    Not that I know alot about this but what is done to it that make it sporterise? This has never been modified to my knowlage. and looks just like ever other one I have looked
     
  7. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Click on the thumbnail, this is an unmodified Springfield 1903:

    [​IMG]

    Here's a video as well:

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Y6nk9R1a3E[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2009
  8. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    You can find an authentic looking stock for it. That's the way it looks best.

    Northridge has some used surplus stocks.

    Sarco occasionally has some too.

    Many people would buy these surplus rifles and cut the stocks down to save weight. That's what "sporterizing" is. That's what was done to yours. Maybe it was like that when purchased. It lessens the value to us collectors who love original configurations, but it has no effect on sentimental value or use of the rifle.
     
  9. dandyduct

    dandyduct New Member

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    Nice Unit

    Ridgerunneras.

    It looks like you have an original 1903 sporter. Price range from 7000 to 1800 depending on condition. Wish I had your gun.

    dandyduct
     
  10. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Very nice indeed! Who manufactured the rifle? My dad bought one in Arsenal New condition which had never been fired. It was made by Smith Corona. He traded the military stock to his friend for a beautifully figured Monte Carlo Walnut sporter stock that was sold by JC Penny at the time. That destroyed any collectors value even for an unfired 1903. I may be wrong, but your pic looks like the barrel is shorter and tapered more than the original military config barrel - which means it probably won't fit well in a military stock.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2009
  11. Tuner

    Tuner New Member

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    This post is coming late but I hope that you have done nothing to modify / refinish your Springfield. Springfield manufactured a sporter version of the
    Springfield Rifle for a short time that looked like the rifle you have. They had I believe a Lyman Model 48 rear sight on the rear receiver bridge. Springfield was stopped from making these because the government was in competition with private industry, not an acceptable thing. Not many of these were produced but they did have star gauged barrels. In any condition these are highly desirable; but unmodified and in excellent condition they bringing prices from a collector that are out of sight. Someone in an earlier thread mentioned $7,000 and I would agree with that or more. UNMODIFIED MEANS ORIGINAL FINISH ON THE STOCK!!! Refinishing the stock could literally cost thousands in value. The only thing you should do this rifle is keep it clean, keep it oiled down and don't "ding" the stock or metal. The next thing is to go on line and Google Springfield Sporters and researcch them. You should be able find out all the information on your rifle to correctly identify it. Sonewhere there is probably a list of serial numbers that that Springfield Armory used in the production of the sporters.

    Another very collectable Springfield is the T model or Target. Very few people are aware that Springfield even produced such a model. Today the ongoing "craze" seems to center more on modern military weapons like M16's, M1's, ak's sks's, etc., and that is understandable. But campare the quality of manufacture of a "Springfield" Springfield Rifle, work the bolt, look at the quality machine parts and then compare them to the stampings and castings and cost saving measure used in modern military firearms you will get a real appreciation for the former. This in no way is intended to condem modern military firearms and there are a lot of coutom builders that are making them into super firearms with tack driving accuracy. This is like compaing classical to contemoprary, each has its proponents and some like them all.
     
  12. superc

    superc Member

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    That's a good looking rifle. In my opinion too much is being made of "in original military condition" in today's world. The only thing accomplished by storing a gun in a safe is to allow the metal to crystallize and bluing to oxidize in total darkness. Those people forget that the purpose of a gun is to be shot and to shoot well. Likewise way to much is being made of scopes and 400 yard accuracy. Most game in the Northeast US is sighted a lot closer than that where iron sights work both quicker and just as well. I suspect your grandfather knew that. If I could afford a Springfield rifle like that and stumbled upon it, I would probably buy it.

    Forty years ago I met a man, an old man, a World War I vet. I met him at a butcher near Tannersville, NY to which a friend and I had brought a deer we had killed. The old man was there for the same reason. His rifle was more or less just like yours. He told us that during WWI he had carried a Springfield, and sometime in the 20s he bought that one and had it sporterized with the peep sight and the shorter stock. He told us he never felt the need to replace it. I guess not.

    We had killed our deer with a shoulder to heart shot. His was hit hit in the back of the skull. We learned it was a running shot at about 100 yards and he had timed the shot to coincide with the jump. Its forty years and many rifles later and I still lack enough confidence to try a shot like that casually. Speaking to the butcher later we learned the old timer brought in two or three deer a year and had been doing that for decades since the butcher's father first began his business in the area. To the butcher's recollection almost all of the man's deer were head shots. Always with the same rifle.



    I learned something that day. Beware the man who has only one gun. He is probably pretty good with it.