US Model of 1917, Eddystone; Bore Condition

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by The_Kid, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

    564
    0
    0
    I wanted to post on the bore of my 95 year old Eddystone US Model of 1917 which is quite rough, but not as rough as it used to be.

    I got this rifle from my dad 30 years ago and didn't think the barrel was quite as bad as it was. I used to check the bore by removing the bolt then looking through the chamber pointed at a light source or bright item such as a white piece of paper. Using that method I thought the bore was pretty good, it looked like a mirror.

    It wasn't until a vigorous cleaning and a few pics with a digital camera that I was made aware of the true condition of my bore... Observe;

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    That was 1.5 years ago, after a 3 day cleaning marathon.
    Either someone had thought they were getting the rifle clean, or just didn't care to. I am sure it had been shot using old corrosive ammo.

    I didn't want to get too involved with expensive methods of trying to get the bore back into shape, I didn't actually have much faith in improving it to tell you the truth. So I decided to keep it clean and shoot it as I normally would.

    Since I usually take one shot a day, (with whatever rifle I feel like shooting that day,) and would clean it after each use, the process was much like a barrel break-in procedure. Here is what it looks like today.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    That is a lot better than it had been. It used to be so bad that none of my cleaning brushes would follow the rifling as I swabbed the bore; now they do.

    It still copper fouls worse than any rifle I've ever seen but it shoots well.
    [​IMG]
    The square outline was where a white piece of cardboard was that I used as an aiming point.

    I'll continue with the cleaning process as I have been, hopefully it will be even smoother in another year or so. I probably should measure some of the fired bullets, (or slug the barrel,) to see what the dimensions are.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2011
  2. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

    1,014
    0
    0
    Nice report... Nice grouping coming from open sites at 200 yrds with a very old rifle. Bore is looking very clean as well..
     

  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

    12,369
    57
    48
    How does it do when the load is not "Kinda hot"?

    Pushing a bullet to the extreme (or upper limits) sometimes is not the best formula for accuracy.
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,444
    552
    113
    Considering that all US military 30-06 was corrosive up to about 1952, it is almost certain that your rifle ran a lot of corrosive ammo.

    Bore looks a LOT better (nice photography, BTW). You might consider trying some JB's Bore shine- very mild abrasive used on a patch- to help smooth out some of the rough spots- but that is still very decent accuracy.
     
  5. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

    4,481
    112
    63
    My Arisaka was/is the same way.. I think I was the first to clean or shoot it from when it was taken in WWII.
    You should get a actual bore light, it lets you see down the entire length of the bore, into chambers, a nice thing to have..

    Im gonna try your cleaning method though.... The last couple of times I took the Arisaka out I learned it has a super tight bore and it fouled real bad with copper...
    I was loading .310 bullets pulled from Mosin ammo that shot great with no problems. I bought some .311 bullets because .310 isnt easy to find locally and everywhere you read says the Arisaka takes .311-.312. But no matter how low I loaded it I would get pressure signs on my brass (sticky brass, flat primers), and it copper fouled bad - The copper almost fills the rifling, Im having a hell of a time getting it out.... :(
     
  6. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

    564
    0
    0
    I have no problems whatsoever accuracy wise when load developing for this rifle... or any of my rifles for that matter. The reason it is kinda hot is; this is how hot the load must be to jibe with the predetermined sight graduations.

    I was tired of chasing POIs with temperature sensitive powders so I changed powder from IMR 4064, (which worked fine in the summer months,) to a supposedly temperature insensitive powder. I tried Varget first, but couldn't get the desired POI height, then settled on H4895.

    ...
    Of course today was the first time I shot it at 38ºF, (42ºF colder than load development,) whereas the POI was 10" lower at 400 yards.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rLzXRFpHTg"]H4895 is Temperature Sensitive[/ame]

    So I might as well use the mild load with IMR4064, because I'm going to have to carry a cartridge in my pocket, (keeping it warm,) when shooting during winter anyway.
     
  7. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

    564
    0
    0
    I have a bore light. A bore scope is what would probably do better than the camera I use now. But I can see the entire length with magnified images now, I just need to focus on the area I wish to capture.

    I would try slugging the barrel to see what the actual dimensions are. It could possibly use a 308 diameter bullet with no issues. I would run that plan by an expert before I tried it.
     
  8. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

    564
    0
    0
    BTW: Thanks for the compliments! :)
     
  9. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

    564
    0
    0
    I tried the Eddystone again at 400 yards today, but this time I warmed the cartridge before I shot it.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFQWV93XpAY"]Eddystone, US Model of 1917[/ame]

    It shot right where it should have.

    It looks like there really isn't a temperature insensitive powder... at least temperature insensitive enough to make the summer/winter difference.