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I have always wanted a SA since I was a kid watching John Wayne. Finally have the time money and place to be able to carry one around the ranch. Now hoping to get some opinions from people who have one or both. Thanks for your input.
 

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Have a Ruger 1873 SA chambered in 45 colt. I have been very impressed with the accuracy and love the ruggedness with which it was made. Put inexpensive Hogue ivory grips on it and it looks great. Very fun gun to own. Besides every time I pull it out to shoot it I can say "I'll make you famous!" Here is a pic.
 

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I've got a uberti cattleman hombre in 357. It was my first revolver and my favorite gun overall. I had to send it back to have the base pin deburred, but for the price I paid for I couldn't be happier. My only regret was not getting one in 45 LC when my shop had them on sale. Almost forgot I had to polish the cylinders since I could extract spent 357 shells, but 38s were no problem. It is remarkably accurate for me and shoots point of aim. I wouldn't hesitate to get another. But I wouldn't pass up a deal on a Ruger either.
 

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the ruger new vaquero fit and finish is better than the ubertis and they dont need any work right out of the box if you intend to do any cas. the new vaquero in 45colt with the 45acp cylinders is a no brainer. here are my pair in consecutive serials.

 

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If you want the real thing then buy the real thing. John Wayne always used Colts except in one movie The Shootist. They were a pair of engraved Great Western revolvers that were a gift to him many years prior.

Rugers are fine guns and their strength is always remarked about. I've never owned one, cause I frankly wasn't comfortable with their action and they never felt like a Colt when shooting them. I've never worried about a transfer bar for safety. Carrying 5 instead of 6 is my safety and I've been handling them for over 40 years. Where Colts are concerned if you don't know what your doing you can certainly bust a spring, or damage a hammer notch. Speaking of notches the Colt has 4 that spell out C-O-L-T. The Ruger feels different in the hand and unless modified hasn't those 4 clicks that the Colt is known for. Gary Reeder does great work on Rugers.

The USFA revolvers are excellent and they're less pricey than the Colts and are made in the old Colt factory to exact specifications. In my opinion they're superior to the Colts that have been manufactured in recent years. But they aren't stronger than Rugers if that's important to you.

If money is tight there are the Italian copies than can be considered. Those spaghetti westerns of the 60's started a new industry and a company like Uberti deserves all the credit in the world for giving us all those pistol and rifle reproductions. They did what should've been done here. Even the 2nd generation BP revolver parts for the '51 Navy that Colt turned out in the early 70's were actually made by Uberti in Italy and put together and finished by Colt here.

There's no such thing as a trouble free gun and Colts, Rugers, Ubertis and Cimarrons are no exception. Basically they're all good guns, but like I said before if you want a genuine western gun then get the original, or the closest thing to it, cause if you're a purist like I am then nothing else will ever really satisfy you.

The 2nd generation Colts were actually the best ever made, though the 1st generations are the most sought after. They can be quite expensive, but a bargain can be had if purchasing a 2nd generation Colt New Frontier. They just came out with a new version, but I won't recommend them. A 2nd generation New Frontier can be had for much cheaper than the SAA, due to the adjustable sights, which never bothered Elmer Keith and me as well. It's still a great SA to consider. By the way, Colt did manufacture 1st generations with adjustable sights like the Bisley Flat Top Target. I have a reproduction of that one made by Cimarron(which is actually Uberti) and it's a tack driver in 44-40.

As far as caliber is concerned I'm partial to 45LC and 44-40. I also have 32-20 and like the 38-40 a lot. If trying to save money then I guess .357 would allow you to shoot 38 spl. as well. The .357 was also a caliber offered in the later years of the 1st generation Colts prior to WWII.

I'm sorry for going on and on, but old west guns are my passion and I'm fairly familiar with them. I'm not putting down Ruger, but this isn't about hunting with these guns, or how strong they are. If taken care of properly these SA's will last more than a life time and as proof I shoot many that are well over 100 years old and they're in better condition than I am. Like anything else you have to get what you want that'll fit your needs and if it's something that's perhaps a little too expensive then have the patience to save your money in order to get what you really want. Having just one gun you really love is better than having a dozen guns that you consider just so so. I've already posted photos of some of my Colts, so I won't bore you again. Good luck with whatever you choose.
 

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Between Ruger and Uberti I would choose Ruger. Add Colt in the mix and it would be tough not to go with that.
 

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I would take the Uberti over the new Rugers.

The older, larger Ruger was a great gun, but I dislike the new smaller ones.

The fit and finish is better on the Uberti and most of the parts are interchangeable with the Colt.
 

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If you will hunt with the 45 then get ONLY the large frame ruger super black hawk frame as the other small frame ruger and colt and uberty can not handel the hotter loads .
 

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gunsmoke11 said:
If you want the real thing then buy the real thing. John Wayne always used Colts except in one movie The Shootist. They were a pair of engraved Great Western revolvers that were a gift to him many years prior.

Rugers are fine guns and their strength is always remarked about. I've never owned one, cause I frankly wasn't comfortable with their action and they never felt like a Colt when shooting them. I've never worried about a transfer bar for safety. Carrying 5 instead of 6 is my safety and I've been handling them for over 40 years. Where Colts are concerned if you don't know what your doing you can certainly bust a spring, or damage a hammer notch. Speaking of notches the Colt has 4 that spell out C-O-L-T. The Ruger feels different in the hand and unless modified hasn't those 4 clicks that the Colt is known for. Gary Reeder does great work on Rugers.

The USFA revolvers are excellent and they're less pricey than the Colts and are made in the old Colt factory to exact specifications. In my opinion they're superior to the Colts that have been manufactured in recent years. But they aren't stronger than Rugers if that's important to you.

If money is tight there are the Italian copies than can be considered. Those spaghetti westerns of the 60's started a new industry and a company like Uberti deserves all the credit in the world for giving us all those pistol and rifle reproductions. They did what should've been done here. Even the 2nd generation BP revolver parts for the '51 Navy that Colt turned out in the early 70's were actually made by Uberti in Italy and put together and finished by Colt here.

There's no such thing as a trouble free gun and Colts, Rugers, Ubertis and Cimarrons are no exception. Basically they're all good guns, but like I said before if you want a genuine western gun then get the original, or the closest thing to it, cause if you're a purist like I am then nothing else will ever really satisfy you.

The 2nd generation Colts were actually the best ever made, though the 1st generations are the most sought after. They can be quite expensive, but a bargain can be had if purchasing a 2nd generation Colt New Frontier. They just came out with a new version, but I won't recommend them. A 2nd generation New Frontier can be had for much cheaper than the SAA, due to the adjustable sights, which never bothered Elmer Keith and me as well. It's still a great SA to consider. By the way, Colt did manufacture 1st generations with adjustable sights like the Bisley Flat Top Target. I have a reproduction of that one made by Cimarron(which is actually Uberti) and it's a tack driver in 44-40.

As far as caliber is concerned I'm partial to 45LC and 44-40. I also have 32-20 and like the 38-40 a lot. If trying to save money then I guess .357 would allow you to shoot 38 spl. as well. The .357 was also a caliber offered in the later years of the 1st generation Colts prior to WWII.

I'm sorry for going on and on, but old west guns are my passion and I'm fairly familiar with them. I'm not putting down Ruger, but this isn't about hunting with these guns, or how strong they are. If taken care of properly these SA's will last more than a life time and as proof I shoot many that are well over 100 years old and they're in better condition than I am. Like anything else you have to get what you want that'll fit your needs and if it's something that's perhaps a little too expensive then have the patience to save your money in order to get what you really want. Having just one gun you really love is better than having a dozen guns that you consider just so so. I've already posted photos of some of my Colts, so I won't bore you again. Good luck with whatever you choose.
Thank you for the insight. My LGS did not have colt so I have not had a chance to handle one.
 

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Thank you for the insight. My LGS did not have colt so I have not had a chance to handle one.
It's important not to rush into anything. Sooner or later you'll find a Colt to handle and it's important to check out everything that's out there. What might be perfect for me may not satisfy your needs. You might even be a Ruger person, who knows? Anyway, I wish you lots of luck and I'm sure eventually you'll find something to your liking.;)
 

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Thank you for the insight. My LGS did not have colt so I have not had a chance to handle one.
It's important not to rush into anything. Sooner or later you'll find a Colt to handle and it's important to check out everything that's out there. What might be perfect for me may not satisfy your needs. You might even be a Ruger person, who knows? Anyway, I wish you lots of luck and I'm sure eventually you'll find something to your liking.;)
That settles it! Get one of each and decide which one you like the best. The others can move to the back of the safe. ;)
 

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Colts made Post 2nd Generation SAA are in no way the quality of the early models. The Colt Cowboy Model is a not a quality handgun. It is too bad the Colt SAA is a very over priced handgun. I have owned Colts for more than 50 years. :(
 

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Colts made Post 2nd Generation SAA are in no way the quality of the early models. The Colt Cowboy Model is a not a quality handgun. It is too bad the Colt SAA is a very over priced handgun. I have owned Colts for more than 50 years. :(

The Cowboy was a piece of garbage made in Europe and parts weren't compatible with any other Colts previously made including 3rds. It wasn't even a real Colt in my opinion and they should've been ashamed of themselves for selling them. Any Italian repro put those guns to shame.

The 2nd generation Colts were the most refined ever made. Their steel and finish were more durable than anything they had before. That gun was perfected and then they blew it, probably to make more profits. Their floating firing pin was superior to the early 1st generation fixed pins, which broke way more often. The parts of the 2nd generation were compatible with the first. The 3rd generations changed the barrel thread and ever since weren't able to use the barrels of the earlier models unless they wanted it to be permanent after crossing the threads. The base pin screw on the BP 1st generations was an inferior design to the newer spring type. Many of those screws got stripped and I know, because I've replaced more than a couple of base pin screws with the over sized ones. In addition they made taking the gun apart for cleaning more difficult. The early 1st had cast iron frames as opposed to steel in the later ones. Shoot a BP Colt with cowboy ammo and you're taking a chance on cracking the frame. My friend has a nice crack in the frame of his ca. 1876 SA, because he used loaded down ammo as opposed to BP. The early BP Colt's bores had inferior rifling, because their lands were narrow and the grooves were wide. Later models are opposite and that gives the rifling a longer life. The 3rds eliminated the the base pin bushing to save on manufacturing costs.

Anyone who knows the Colt SAA well won't argue that the 2nd generation was the cream of the crop. They were the result of over 70 years of trial and error. I own 1st's and 2nd's and never owned a 3rd, though I have some friends that have some early beauties. I admit my first love is for the 1st generation. After 45 years of owning and shooting Colts when I pick one up I get excited just like the first time I did. Those guns are our history.
 
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